These states give the most money to the presidential race

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Money Continues to Pour in for Sanders Campaign

By Palmer Gibbs, Graphiq

Donors in California, Texas and New York have given the most money to 2016 presidential candidates, proving that although this year's election is unprecedented in many ways, these three states continue to dole out the most political dough.

An InsideGov analysis of the most recent data available from the Federal Election Commission found that, as of Feb. 29, fundraising from these three states accounted for $115,059,468. That's about 39 percent of the $295,561,165 raised so far for official campaign committees. Data reflects contributions from individuals of at least $200 each, according to FEC reporting rules.

California tops the list by far, with $49,322,773 pouring into political campaigns from the Golden State. The majority of that sum — $32,232,968 — went to Democratic candidates, not entirely surprising considering California's long-held blue state status.

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These states give the most money to the presidential race

Tim Kaine

The junior Democratic Senator from the swing state of Virginia could be a strategic selection for Hillary. Kaine also served as the governor of Virginia from 2006- 2010.

(Photo by Samuel Corum/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images)

Elizabeth Warren

The current U.S. Senator from Massachusetts is popular among progressive Democrats, and some even tried to draft her to run for president herself in 2016. 

(Photo by Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images)

Sherrod Brown

Insiders believe that the senior U.S. Senator from Ohio could help Clinton increase her popularity with working-class voters, a group she has yet to win in a big way so far in primary contests.  

(Photo By Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Cory Booker

The U.S. Senator from New Jersey is both youthful and charismatic and would add racial diversity to a Clinton ticket. 

(Photo by KK Ottesen for The Washington Post via Getty Images)

Tom Perez

The current U.S. Secretary of Labor is considered a sleeper pick by many Democrats because he is not well known outside of D.C., but some believe his strength and popularity among union workers and other progressive groups could be an asset to Clinton's ticket. 

(Photo By Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Julian Castro

The former mayor of San Antonio and current U.S. Secretary of Housing and Urban Development has been rumored as a possible running mate for Clinton for months, but in May he said in an interview that the Clinton campaign hasn't talked to him about the role.

(AP Photo/Eric Gay)

Amy Klobuchar

Insiders confirmed that Clinton is definitely considering a woman as her vice presidential pick, and as U.S. Senator from Minnesota, Klobuchar has a seat Democrats would likely maintain. She's also been described as "by far" the most popular politician in her state. 

 (AP Photo/Ann Heisenfelt)

Bernie Sanders

The Independent from Vermont has become Hillary Clinton's primary rival for the Democratic nomination, garnering a surprising amount of support. Bringing Sanders onto the ticket could help to unite both sets of supporters who have been split in Democratic primaries.

(Photo by Ralph Freso/Getty Images)

Martin O'Malley

A former 2016 rival of Hillary Clinton, and former Maryland governor, Martin O’Malley could help bring some executive experience, along with a slight youthful boost to the ticket.

(Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images)

Tom Vilsack

The Secretary of Agriculture since 2009, Tom Vilsack also served as the governor of Iowa from 1999 to 2007. Vilsack could bring some governing experience along with swing state influence.  

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Colorado Gov. John Hickenlooper delivers his annual State of the State address to lawmakers and guests, inside the state legislature, in Denver, Thursday, Jan. 14, 2016. Hickenlooper called upon Republicans and Democrats to return to an era of civility and compromise in his address to the Republican-controlled Senate and the Democrat-led House. (AP Photo/Brennan Linsley)

Evan Bayh 

Evan Bayh could bring a more right leaning brand of politics to the ticket. Bayh previously served as the junior U.S. Senator from Indiana from 1999 to 2011, and also as the 46th Governor of Indiana from 1989 to 1997.  

Joe Biden

While the likelihood of him agreeing to take on the veep job again might be low, Biden's popularity among Democrats would likely boost Clinton's chances. 

(Photo credit MANDEL NGAN/AFP/Getty Images)

Bill Clinton

Hillary's husband is technically allowed to serve in the job, and some legal experts even think he'd be able to take office if necessary. Unfortunately for the diehard Clinton supporters, a Clinton-Clinton ticket will probably be a dream that never comes true. 

(Photo By Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

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Donors in Texas gave the second-highest amount, at $34,261,498 total, with over three-quarters going to GOP candidates. Republican presidential hopefuls have raised more than $26.5 million from Texas so far this campaign, and more than half of that went to Houston native and Texas Sen. Ted Cruz.

Although New York comes in third overall — with $31,475,197 total coming from the state — it has been the second-most lucrative place for Democrats thus far. Donors in the Empire State have contributed $21,579,317 to Democratic candidates, with most of that going to former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton, who represented New York in the Senate from 2001 to 2009. Businessman Donald Trump, a New York native who has a residence in Manhattan, has raised $144,276 from donors in the state.

Clinton has raised the most money overall, with her official campaign committee bringing in almost $160 million. In addition to winning the money race in New York state, Clinton was also the top fundraiser in California, hauling in just shy of $24 million from that state.

While California, Texas and New York are among the most populous states in the country, thus impacting fundraising totals, political campaigns often benefit from deep-pocketed cities as the primary source of monetary support. Clinton, for example, has collected a ton of money throughout California, but a more in-depth look at her fundraising tallies shows she also received large sums from New York City and Washington, D.C., where she has deep professional and political ties.

Donors in the Big Apple have contributed almost $11 million to Clinton. Some notable names from Clinton's long list of New York-based donors? Clothing designer Alexander Wang and artist Jeff Koons gave $2,700 apiece, the maximum amount one individual can give per election. Longtime Clinton contact Tina Flournoy — who has worked in multiple Democratic campaigns, including former President Bill Clinton's and Hillary Clinton's 2008 bid, and is Bill Clinton's personal chief of staff — gave $2,700. Clinton also received $2,700 from Gretchen Rubin, a best-selling author who writes about happiness and human nature. Her father-in-law, Robert Rubin, was the Treasury secretary during former President Bill Clinton's second term.

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These states give the most money to the presidential race

Newt Gingrich

Former Speaker of the House Newt Gingrich could provide Trump with exactly what he is looking for in a running mate — an experienced lawmaker who pushed legislation through Congress for years.

Though he has been actively aboard the Kasich bandwagon in recent days, Gingrich has come to Trump's defense regarding both the establishment backlash to his candidacy and the controversy the frontrunner found himself in after initially failing in a CNN interview to disavow support from former Ku Klux Klan leader David Duke.

(Joe Burbank/Orlando Sentinel/TNS via Getty Images)

Indiana Gov. Mike Pence

Pence is rumored to be one of the final few people on Donald Trump's short list to be running mate. He appeared with him mere days before Trump was expected to announce his decision, and even met with Trump's family. 

Pence found himself in the spotlight in recent months after defending Indiana's religious liberty law that was criticized by many as being discriminatory against the LGBT community. 

(Photo by REUTERS/John Sommers II)

Ivanka Trump

A wildcard choice for sure, some began to wonder if Donald Trump might consider naming his daughter as his running mate after Sen. Bob Corker suggested the move shortly after taking himself out of the mix. 

Ivanka, who would turn 35 mere days before the election, has not addressed the rumors, but brother Eric backed her

(Photo by REUTERS/Carlo Allegri)

Michael Flynn

The 57-year-old retired lieutenant general has been advising the campaign on foreign affairs for months, but as Flynn's under-the-radar candidacy gained steam as Trump's decision drew near.

Conservative supporters have warned that Flynn isn't sufficiently tough on social issues.  

(Photo by REUTERS/Gary Cameron/File photo TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY)

Chris Christie

Gov. Chris Christie of New Jersey is the only 2016 GOP presidential candidate who has endorsed Trump since leaving the race.

Christie could help Trump with more moderate GOP voters, and he certainly has the bombastic personality that would serve as a useful surrogate for Trump, though the two also fiercely criticized each other when they were both candidates in the race.

Back in November, Trump said Christie could have a "place" on his ticket.

(Photo by John Moore/Getty Images)

Jeff Sessions

Sen. Jeff Sessions of Alabama is the only sitting senator to endorse Trump — and he has already been tapped to lead Trump's national-security advisory committee.

"A movement is afoot that must not fade away," Sessions said during the Alabama rally where he announced his support last month.

Sessions is one of the staunchest supporters of Trump's hard-line plan to crack down on illegal immigration. The senator could also give Trump credibility in the South.

(Photo By Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Scott Brown

Former Sen. Scott Brown of Massachusetts was the first current or former senator to endorse Trump. He was known in the Senate as a moderate, and he could help pick up votes with some in the less conservative wing of the Republican Party.

He has supported abortion rights and is in favor of banning assault weapons, but he carries a blue-collar, populist persona. Brown memorably drove a pickup truck to campaign events during his 2010 Senate run in Massachusetts, which was to fill a vacant seat.

Trump acknowledged that Brown may very well be his pick.

During a January event in New Hampshire, Trump said Brown was cut out of "central casting" and could be his vice president. Brown said at the time that Trump was "the next president of the United States."

(Photo by Keith Bedford/The Boston Globe via Getty Images)

Paul LePage

"I was Donald Trump before Donald Trump became popular," Gov. Paul LePage of Maine said while announcing his support for the GOP frontrunner last month on "The Howie Carr Show."

The governor is comparable to Trump when it comes to provocative remarks. In January, LePage found himself at the center of a national firestorm after he made some racially tinged comments about out-of-state drug dealers who come into Maine and "impregnate a young white girl" before leaving.

"Now I get to defend all the good stuff he says," LePage has said of Trump.

LePage also entered politics after a successful business career, but he was reportedly staunchly opposed to Trump's candidacy before suddenly coming on board.

(Photo by Shawn Patrick Ouellette/Portland Press Herald via Getty Images)

Mike Huckabee

Former Gov. Mike Huckabee of Arkansas, who was once in the 2016 GOP presidential race, has been defending Trump in recent weeks. Plus, his daughter is now working as a part of Trump's campaign.

Last week, BuzzFeed reported that advisers close to Huckabee thought the vice-president nod was in the cards for their guy.

Of all the former 2016 White House contenders, Huckabee may be closest to Trump ideologically. Huckabee struck a populist tone on cultural issues and, like Trump, vowed to protect Social Security and Medicare if elected.

(Photo by Christopher Furlong/Getty Images)

John Kasich

Aside from a few brushups in the fall, Gov. John Kasich of Ohio has barely touched Trump along the trail. The same can be said for Trump, whose most brutal attack against Kasich is that he "got lucky" because of the natural-gas reserves in his state.

It has been rumored that Trump would be interested in Kasich as his running mate, though Trump has also recently started criticizing Kasich on the campaign trail.

Kasich has the political experience that Trump says he's seeking. Kasich also hails from the Midwest, one of the most competitive regions in the past few presidential races.

(Photo by Scott Olson/Getty Images)

Rick Scott

It has been an ongoing rumor that Gov. Rick Scott of Florida will endorse Trump after Scott wrote a gushing op-ed article in USA Today in January.

Like Trump, Scott rose to power from the business world. But Scott also has clout in the largest general-election swing state. In addition, he has six years of government experience behind him after being elected to office in 2010.

Of note: The hospital company where Scott served as CEO had to pay a $1.7 billion Medicare fraud penalty in 2000.

(Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images)

Sarah Palin

We can dream, right?

John McCain's running mate in 2008, Sarah Palin was a big get for Trump when she endorsed the frontrunner over Ted Cruz, whom she had vigorously campaigned for during his Senate run in 2012.

If Trump is interested in a sharp break with the Republican establishment, picking Palin would certainly send that signal.

It's an open question, however, as to whether she boosted or hindered McCain's run during the 2008 race.

(Photo by Patrick T. Fallon/Bloomberg via Getty Images)

Oklahoma Republican Governor Mary Fallin makes remarks before the opening of the National Governors Association Winter Meeting in Washington, in this February 22, 2014 file photo. REUTERS/Mike Theiler/Files
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Clinton has also collected close to $4.6 million from D.C.-based donors, who range from lobbyists to lawyers to professors. She received $2,700 from Vic Fazio, a former congressman from California who is now a senior adviser at well-known law firm Akin Gump. Robert Stout, the vice president of regulatory affairs at oil and gas company BP America, gave Clinton $2,700. Clinton also got $2,700 apiece from Deputy Secretary of State Antony Blinken and from Christopher Dodd, the current chairman of the Motion Picture Association of America and a longtime Democratic politician from Connecticut who served with Clinton in the Senate.

Clinton has brought in almost $3.8 million from donors in Los Angeles. Although certainly a liberal pocket of the country, Clinton's ability to find widespread support there reflects a departure from the 2008 election, when Hollywood heavyweights were divided between her and then-Sen. Barack Obama during the contentious Democratic primary.

This year, Clinton has tapped both household names and entertainment executives for her campaign. She's hit the trail with pop star Katy Perry, who last September contributed $2,700. Amy Poehler, who portrayed Clinton on "Saturday Night Live," gave Clinton $2,700 last October (and secured a Clinton guest spot on Comedy Central's "Broad City," of which Poehler is an executive producer). Will Ferrell, who portrayed former President George W. Bush on "Saturday Night Live" during the early 2000s, also gave $2,700 in February 2016. And Clinton received $2,700 each from IMAX CEO Greg Foster, Live Nation higher-up David Zedeck, GoPro President Tony Bates and Michael Rubel, a managing partner at talent agency giant Creative Artists Agency. Mark Itkin, a Hollywood high-roller who played a significant role in popularizing reality television with series like "The Real World" and "Project Runway," gave Clinton $5,400 last spring — $2,700 for the primary election and $2,700 for the general election. The CEO of Live Nation, Michael Rapino, has also given Clinton a total of $5,400.

Those fundraising figures from Los Angeles may see a spike next month. George Clooney and his wife, Amal, are slated to host Clinton at their L.A. home on April 16 for a fundraiser for the Hillary Victory Fund, a joint fundraising committee for Clinton's campaign and the Democratic National Committee. Tickets to the event go for $33,400 per person.

Despite her fast and furious fundraising, Clinton still hasn't officially tied up the Democratic nomination. Although exceptions always exist, political wisdom commonly held that a campaign with deep pockets led to success — a well-padded bank account meant a candidate could buy ad time, purchase campaign materials like mailers and lawn signs and pay a large team to staff multiple offices and run a strong media operation.

But the exceptional nature of this year's race has complicated that equation. Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders continues to draw large crowds and rack up delegates during the Democratic primary.

On what CNN dubbed Western Tuesday last week, Sanders won the Idaho and Utah caucuses. And on Saturday, Sanders cleaned up, winning all three states caucusing — Hawaii, Washington and Alaska. The recent batch of wins puts Sanders at 1,004 total delegates of the 2,383 needed to secure the Democratic nomination. (Despite the latest results, Clinton still holds a substantial lead, with 1,712 total delegates.)

Sanders has brought in close to $140 million total, according to the latest reports from the FEC. When it comes to donations of $200 or more, donors in California and New York have been the most generous to Sanders, contributing a little over $8 million and $3.2 million, respectively. Overall, Sanders has received almost $45.5 million in contributions of $200 or more.

But, as Sanders often points out during his speeches and rallies, most contributions to his campaign are for less than $200 each. Data shows that about 66 percent — or $92,598,033 — of the contributions to the Sanders campaign so far are from small-dollar donations. The campaign is not required to report specifics of smaller contributions, meaning that granular-level data isn't available on many of Sanders' donors.

The power of the small donor plays out on the Republican side as well, where GOP frontrunner Trump has found much success. As the above visualization shows, Trump has raised 76 percent of his campaign cash via small-dollar donations — the highest percentage among the candidates still in the race. It's another data point showing an interesting connection between the Trump and Sanders populist-tinged campaigns. Although Trump and Sanders hail from different sides of the ideological spectrum, they have both successfully tapped into Americans' frustration with money in politics.

But unlike Sanders, Trump has loaned his campaign a large sum from his extensive personal fortune. Trump has given his presidential campaign a total of about $24.4 million, and $6,850,000 in February 2016 alone, according to FEC reports.

The next campaign finance reports, covering March figures, will be released on April 20. Before then, Wisconsin and New York will host their delegate-rich primaries, on April 5 and April 19, respectively.

More: Why Donald Trump Is Sticking Around

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