Kesha says she was offered her 'freedom' if she retracts her sexual abuse allegations

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Kesha Says She Was Offered 'Freedom' If She Took Back Her Rape Claim


It's been nearly two months since Kesha was denied her injunction request to work outside of her contract, but she's not giving up the fight.

In an Instagram post, the singer revealed that she was allegedly offered her "freedom" if she were to publicly recant her sexual assault allegations against producer Dr. Luke (real name Lukasz Gottwald).

"I got offered my freedom if I were to lie," she wrote in the photo caption on Sunday. "I would have to apologize publicly and say that I never got raped. This is what happens behind closed doors. I will not take back the truth. I would rather let the truth ruin my career than lie for a monster ever again."

Kesha and Dr. Luke have been locked in a legal battle since 2014 after she accused him of sexual assault. Dr. Luke filed a countersuit for defamation and claimed the singer was trying to get out of her contract, which requires her to release six albums under Kemosabe Records, Dr. Luke's label owned by Sony.

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Court rules Kesha must continue working with alleged rapist Dr. Luke
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Kesha says she was offered her 'freedom' if she retracts her sexual abuse allegations
Pop star Kesha leaves Supreme court in New York, Friday, Feb. 19, 2016. Kesha is fighting to wrest her career away from a hitmaker she says drugged, sexually abused and psychologically tormented her _ and still has exclusive rights to make records with her. Producer Dr. Luke says the singer is slinging falsehoods and ruining his reputation to try to weasel out of her recording contract and strike a new deal. (AP Photo/Mary Altaffer)
NEW YORK, NY - FEBRUARY 19: Kesha makes a court appearance as fans protest Sony Music Entertainment outside New York State Supreme Court on February 19, 2016 in New York City. Sony has refused to voluntarily release the pop star from her contract which requires her to make eight more albums with producer Dr. Luke, a man she claims sexually assaulted her. (Photo by Roy Rochlin/Getty Images)
Kesha arrives for an appearance in her case against Sony Music Entertainment at New York State Supreme Court on February 19, 2016 in New York City. Sony has refused to voluntarily release the pop star from her contract which requires her to make three more albums with producer Dr. Luke, a man she claims sexually assaulted her. (Photo by James Devaney/GC Images)
NEW YORK, NY - FEBRUARY 19: Michael Eisley who runs the Kesha Today Twitter account organized Kesha fans to protest Sony Music Entertainment outside New York State Supreme Court on February 19, 2016 in New York City. Sony has refused to voluntarily release the pop star from her contract which requires her to make eight more albums with producer Dr. Luke, a man she claims sexually assaulted her. (Photo by Roy Rochlin/Getty Images)
NEW YORK, NY - FEBRUARY 19: People cheer as singer Kesha is seen arriving at New York State Supreme Court at on February 19, 2016 in New York City. Sony has refused to voluntarily release the pop star from her contract which requires her to make three more albums with producer Dr. Luke, a man she claims sexually assaulted her. (Photo by Raymond Hall/GC Images)
NEW YORK, NY - FEBRUARY 19: Kesha fans protest Sony Music Entertainment outside New York State Supreme Court on February 19, 2016 in New York City. Sony has refused to voluntarily release the pop star from her contract which requires her to make eight more albums with producer Dr. Luke, a man she claims sexually assaulted her. (Photo by Roy Rochlin/Getty Images)
NEW YORK, NY - FEBRUARY 19: Kesha fans protest Sony Music Entertainment outside New York State Supreme Court on February 19, 2016 in New York City. Sony has refused to voluntarily release the pop star from her contract which requires her to make eight more albums with producer Dr. Luke, a man she claims sexually assaulted her. (Photo by Roy Rochlin/Getty Images)
(Pool photo by Jefferson Siegel) - Kesha (center in white) cries as she learns she will not be released from her record label contract in Manhattan Supreme Court on Friday, February 19, 2016. A judge said she would not allow Kesha to leave her record label. (Pool Photo by Jefferson Siegel/NY Daily News via Getty Images)
(Pool photo by Jefferson Siegel) - Kesha (center in white) cries as she learns she will not be released from her record label contract in Manhattan Supreme Court on Friday, February 19, 2016. A judge said she would not allow Kesha to leave her record label. (Pool Photo by Jefferson Siegel/NY Daily News via Getty Images)
A fan, right, screams her support at pop star Kesha as she leaves Supreme court in New York, Friday, Feb. 19, 2016. Kesha is fighting to wrest her career away from a hitmaker she says drugged, sexually abused and psychologically tormented her _ and still has exclusive rights to make records with her. Producer Dr. Luke says the singer is slinging falsehoods and ruining his reputation to try to weasel out of her recording contract and strike a new deal. (AP Photo/Mary Altaffer)
Pop star Kesha, center, leaves Supreme court in New York, Friday, Feb. 19, 2016. Kesha is fighting to wrest her career away from a hitmaker she says drugged, sexually abused and psychologically tormented her _ and still has exclusive rights to make records with her. Producer Dr. Luke says the singer is slinging falsehoods and ruining his reputation to try to weasel out of her recording contract and strike a new deal. (AP Photo/Mary Altaffer)
NEW YORK, NY - FEBRUARY 19: Kesha fans protest Sony Music Entertainment outside New York State Supreme Court on February 19, 2016 in New York City. Sony has refused to voluntarily release the pop star from her contract which requires her to make eight more albums with producer Dr. Luke, a man she claims sexually assaulted her. (Photo by Roy Rochlin/Getty Images)
NEW YORK, NY - FEBRUARY 19: Kesha fans protest Sony Music Entertainment outside New York State Supreme Court on February 19, 2016 in New York City. Sony has refused to voluntarily release the pop star from her contract which requires her to make eight more albums with producer Dr. Luke, a man she claims sexually assaulted her. (Photo by Roy Rochlin/Getty Images)
NEW YORK, NY - FEBRUARY 19: Kesha fans protest Sony Music Entertainment outside New York State Supreme Court on February 19, 2016 in New York City. Sony has refused to voluntarily release the pop star from her contract which requires her to make eight more albums with producer Dr. Luke, a man she claims sexually assaulted her. (Photo by Roy Rochlin/Getty Images)
Pop star Kesha, center, leaves Supreme court in New York, Friday, Feb. 19, 2016. Kesha is fighting to wrest her career away from a hitmaker she says drugged, sexually abused and psychologically tormented her _ and still has exclusive rights to make records with her. Producer Dr. Luke says the singer is slinging falsehoods and ruining his reputation to try to weasel out of her recording contract and strike a new deal. (AP Photo/Mary Altaffer)
NEW YORK, NY - FEBRUARY 19: Kesha leaves the New York State Supreme Court on February 19, 2016 in New York City. Sony has refused to voluntarily release the pop star from her contract which requires her to make three more albums with producer Dr. Luke, a man she claims sexually assaulted her. (Photo by Raymond Hall/GC Images)
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Kesha's injunction request, which was denied in February, would have allowed her to work outside of her contract while the case is ongoing. The singer hasn't released music since 2013.

Fans and celebrities, including Lady Gaga, Adele, Lena Dunham, Taylor Swift, and Demi Lovato, have lent their support to the artist during her legal battle.

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