Chinese honor the dead on Tomb-Sweeping Day

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Chinese honor the dead on Tomb-Sweeping Day
A woman prays in front of a grave during the 'Qingming' festival, or Tomb Sweeping Day, at a cemetary in Babaoshan in Beijing on April 4, 2016. During Qingming, Chinese traditionally tend the graves of their departed loved ones and often burn paper offerings to honour them and keep them comfortable in the afterlife. / AFP / FRED DUFOUR (Photo credit should read FRED DUFOUR/AFP/Getty Images)
A man repaints the letters on a grave during the 'Qingming' festival, or Tomb Sweeping Day, at a cemetary in Babaoshan in Beijing on April 4, 2016. During Qingming, Chinese traditionally tend the graves of their departed loved ones and often burn paper offerings to honour them and keep them comfortable in the afterlife. / AFP / FRED DUFOUR (Photo credit should read FRED DUFOUR/AFP/Getty Images)
Graves are seen during the 'Qingming' festival, or Tomb Sweeping Day, at a cemetary in Babaoshan in Beijing on April 4, 2016. During Qingming, Chinese traditionally tend the graves of their departed loved ones and often burn paper offerings to honour them and keep them comfortable in the afterlife. / AFP / FRED DUFOUR (Photo credit should read FRED DUFOUR/AFP/Getty Images)
A woman cleans a tombstone during the 'Qingming' festival, or Tomb Sweeping Day, at a cemetary in Babaoshan in Beijing on April 4, 2016. During Qingming, Chinese traditionally tend the graves of their departed loved ones and often burn paper offerings to honour them and keep them comfortable in the afterlife. / AFP / FRED DUFOUR (Photo credit should read FRED DUFOUR/AFP/Getty Images)
Women walk past graves adorned with offerings during the 'Qingming' festival, or Tomb Sweeping Day, at a cemetary in Babaoshan in Beijing on April 4, 2016. During Qingming, Chinese traditionally tend the graves of their departed loved ones and often burn paper offerings to honour them and keep them comfortable in the afterlife. / AFP / FRED DUFOUR (Photo credit should read FRED DUFOUR/AFP/Getty Images)
A woman cleans leaves an offering on a grave during the 'Qingming' festival, or Tomb Sweeping Day, at a cemetary in Babaoshan in Beijing on April 4, 2016. During Qingming, Chinese traditionally tend the graves of their departed loved ones and often burn paper offerings to honour them and keep them comfortable in the afterlife. / AFP / FRED DUFOUR (Photo credit should read FRED DUFOUR/AFP/Getty Images)
A man walks past tombstones during the 'Qingming' festival, or Tomb Sweeping Day, at a cemetary in Babaoshan in Beijing on April 4, 2016. During Qingming, Chinese traditionally tend the graves of their departed loved ones and often burn paper offerings to honour them and keep them comfortable in the afterlife. / AFP / FRED DUFOUR (Photo credit should read FRED DUFOUR/AFP/Getty Images)
A woman prays in front of a grave during the 'Qingming' festival, or Tomb Sweeping Day, at a cemetary in Babaoshan in Beijing on April 4, 2016. During Qingming, Chinese traditionally tend the graves of their departed loved ones and often burn paper offerings to honour them and keep them comfortable in the afterlife. / AFP / FRED DUFOUR (Photo credit should read FRED DUFOUR/AFP/Getty Images)
A man repaints the letters on a grave during the 'Qingming' festival, or Tomb Sweeping Day, at a cemetary in Babaoshan in Beijing on April 4, 2016. During Qingming, Chinese traditionally tend the graves of their departed loved ones and often burn paper offerings to honour them and keep them comfortable in the afterlife. / AFP / FRED DUFOUR (Photo credit should read FRED DUFOUR/AFP/Getty Images)
A woman prays in front of a grave during the 'Qingming' festival, or Tomb Sweeping Day, at a cemetary in Babaoshan in Beijing on April 4, 2016. During Qingming, Chinese traditionally tend the graves of their departed loved ones and often burn paper offerings to honour them and keep them comfortable in the afterlife. / AFP / FRED DUFOUR (Photo credit should read FRED DUFOUR/AFP/Getty Images)
TOPSHOT - A woman pours alcohol over a grave during the 'Qingming' festival, or Tomb Sweeping Day, at a cemetary in Babaoshan in Beijing on April 4, 2016. During Qingming, Chinese traditionally tend the graves of their departed loved ones and often burn paper offerings to honour them and keep them comfortable in the afterlife. / AFP / FRED DUFOUR (Photo credit should read FRED DUFOUR/AFP/Getty Images)
A woman prays at the grave of her parents during the annual 'Qingming' festival, or Tomb Sweeping Day, at a public cemetery in Shanghai on April 4, 2016. During Qingming, Chinese traditionally tend the graves of their departed loved ones and often burn paper offerings to honour them and keep them comfortable in the afterlife. / AFP / JOHANNES EISELE (Photo credit should read JOHANNES EISELE/AFP/Getty Images)
A woman prepares to burn incense at a grave during the annual 'Qingming' festival, or Tomb Sweeping Day, at a public cemetery in Shanghai on April 4, 2016. During Qingming, Chinese traditionally tend the graves of their departed loved ones and often burn paper offerings to honour them and keep them comfortable in the afterlife. / AFP / JOHANNES EISELE (Photo credit should read JOHANNES EISELE/AFP/Getty Images)
A woman looks at graves adorned with various offerings during the annual 'Qingming' festival, or Tomb Sweeping Day, at a public cemetery in Shanghai on April 4, 2016. During Qingming, Chinese traditionally tend the graves of their departed loved ones and often burn paper offerings to honour them and keep them comfortable in the afterlife. / AFP / JOHANNES EISELE (Photo credit should read JOHANNES EISELE/AFP/Getty Images)
A family burn incense at a grave during the annual 'Qingming' festival, or Tomb Sweeping Day, at a public cemetery in Shanghai on April 4, 2016. During Qingming, Chinese traditionally tend the graves of their departed loved ones and often burn paper offerings to honour them and keep them comfortable in the afterlife. / AFP / JOHANNES EISELE (Photo credit should read JOHANNES EISELE/AFP/Getty Images)
TOPSHOT - People visit and tend to graves during the annual 'Qingming' festival, or Tomb Sweeping Day, at a public cemetery in Shanghai on April 4, 2016. During Qingming, Chinese traditionally tend the graves of their departed loved ones and often burn paper offerings to honour them and keep them comfortable in the afterlife. / AFP / JOHANNES EISELE (Photo credit should read JOHANNES EISELE/AFP/Getty Images)
Food, incense and other offerings are pictured on a grave, left by loved ones for the departed, during the annual 'Qingming' festival, or Tomb Sweeping Day, at a public cemetery in Shanghai on April 4, 2016. During Qingming, Chinese traditionally tend the graves of their departed loved ones and often burn paper offerings to honour them and keep them comfortable in the afterlife. / AFP / JOHANNES EISELE (Photo credit should read JOHANNES EISELE/AFP/Getty Images)
A man (2nd R) prays and burns incense at the grave of his parents and sister during the annual 'Qingming' festival, or Tomb Sweeping Day, at a public cemetery in Shanghai on April 4, 2016. During Qingming, Chinese traditionally tend the graves of their departed loved ones and often burn paper offerings to honour them and keep them comfortable in the afterlife. / AFP / JOHANNES EISELE (Photo credit should read JOHANNES EISELE/AFP/Getty Images)
A woman stands between a row of graves during the annual 'Qingming' festival, or Tomb Sweeping Day, at a public cemetery in Shanghai on April 4, 2016. During Qingming, Chinese traditionally tend the graves of their departed loved ones and often burn paper offerings to honour them and keep them comfortable in the afterlife. / AFP / JOHANNES EISELE (Photo credit should read JOHANNES EISELE/AFP/Getty Images)
So called 'spirit money' burns next to a grave as an offering during the annual 'Qingming' festival, or Tomb Sweeping Day, at a public cemetery in Shanghai on April 4, 2016. During Qingming, Chinese traditionally tend the graves of their departed loved ones and often burn paper offerings to honour them and keep them comfortable in the afterlife. / AFP / JOHANNES EISELE (Photo credit should read JOHANNES EISELE/AFP/Getty Images)
A man burns offerings at a grave during the annual 'Qingming' festival, or Tomb Sweeping Day, at a public cemetery in Shanghai on April 4, 2016. During Qingming, Chinese traditionally tend the graves of their departed loved ones and often burn paper offerings to honour them and keep them comfortable in the afterlife. / AFP / JOHANNES EISELE (Photo credit should read JOHANNES EISELE/AFP/Getty Images)
A man (L) prays and burns incense at the grave of his parents and sister during the annual 'Qingming' festival, or Tomb Sweeping Day, at a public cemetery in Shanghai on April 4, 2016. During Qingming, Chinese traditionally tend the graves of their departed loved ones and often burn paper offerings to honour them and keep them comfortable in the afterlife. / AFP / JOHANNES EISELE (Photo credit should read JOHANNES EISELE/AFP/Getty Images)
A man (R) repaints the engravings on a gravestone during the annual 'Qingming' festival, or Tomb Sweeping Day, at a public cemetery in Shanghai on April 4, 2016. During Qingming, Chinese traditionally tend the graves of their departed loved ones and often burn paper offerings to honour them and keep them comfortable in the afterlife. / AFP / JOHANNES EISELE (Photo credit should read JOHANNES EISELE/AFP/Getty Images)
A woman burns incense at a grave during the annual 'Qingming' festival, or Tomb Sweeping Day, at a public cemetery in Shanghai on April 4, 2016. During Qingming, Chinese traditionally tend the graves of their departed loved ones and often burn paper offerings to honour them and keep them comfortable in the afterlife. / AFP / JOHANNES EISELE (Photo credit should read JOHANNES EISELE/AFP/Getty Images)
An aerial view shows that people burn joss paper money as they pray at a public cemetery during Qingming Festival, or Tomb Sweeping Festival, in Fuzhou, Jiangxi Province, China, April 4, 2016. REUTERS/Stringer ATTENTION EDITORS - THIS PICTURE WAS PROVIDED BY A THIRD PARTY. THIS PICTURE IS DISTRIBUTED EXACTLY AS RECEIVED BY REUTERS, AS A SERVICE TO CLIENTS. CHINA OUT. NO COMMERCIAL OR EDITORIAL SALES IN CHINA.
Participants wear traditional costumes at a celebration to worship Yellow Emperor Xuan Yuan, who is considered by many to be the ancestor of the Chinese, during Qingming Festival, also known as Tomb Sweeping Festival, in Hangling county, Shaanxi Province, China, April 4, 2016. REUTERS/China Daily ATTENTION EDITORS - THIS PICTURE WAS PROVIDED BY A THIRD PARTY. THIS PICTURE IS DISTRIBUTED EXACTLY AS RECEIVED BY REUTERS, AS A SERVICE TO CLIENTS. CHINA OUT. NO COMMERCIAL OR EDITORIAL SALES IN CHINA.
Participants hold bamboo sticks as they push to row boats during a traditional celebration for Qingming Festival, also known as Tomb Sweeping Festival, in Taizhou, Jiangsu Province, China, April 4, 2016. REUTERS/Stringer ATTENTION EDITORS - THIS PICTURE WAS PROVIDED BY A THIRD PARTY. THIS PICTURE IS DISTRIBUTED EXACTLY AS RECEIVED BY REUTERS, AS A SERVICE TO CLIENTS. CHINA OUT. NO COMMERCIAL OR EDITORIAL SALES IN CHINA. TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
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Millions of Chinese people took to cemeteries to honor their lost ancestors. The three-day holiday, also called Qingming, ended Monday and the amount of visitors rose by almost 4 percent from last year.

The tombs are swept and lost loved ones are given food, flowers and other offerings.

A more dangerous practice -- which Chinese authorities are trying to end, involves burning fake money and incense. Two forest rangers died in a large blaze initially started by these rituals.

Click through the gallery to see more.

Chinese sweep pets' tombs in Beijing

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