Hansel and Gretel pack heat in the NRA's reimagined fairy tales

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Hansel and Gretel Pack Heat in the NRA's Reimagined Fairy Tales

Remember when your mom used to read you the classic about the wolf and the shotgun-toting grandma? No? Well, the National Rifle Association teamed up with a conservative author to make that fairy tale happen.

New gun-friendly twists on old favorites are published on the NRA's family-oriented sister site NRA Family. The group said the new stories are part of an attempt to make sure children learn how to use firearms responsibly.

An editor's note on the site adds, "Have you ever wondered what those same fairy tales might sound like if the hapless Red Riding Hoods, Hansels and Gretels had been taught about gun safety and how to use firearms?"

Click through images from the 2015 NRA convention:

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Hansel and Gretel pack heat in the NRA's reimagined fairy tales
A convention goers aims a Tavor SAR IDF model semi-automatic weapon at the 2015 NRA Annual Convention in Nashville, Tennessee on April 11, 2015. This is the civilian version of the Tavor Tar-21, issued to Israeli Defense Forces. AFP PHOTO / KAREN BLEIER (Photo credit should read KAREN BLEIER/AFP/Getty Images)
An exhibitor holds up a Bond Arms Ranger II derringer at the 2015 NRA Annual Convention in Nashville, Tennessee on April 11, 2015. AFP PHOTO / KAREN BLEIER (Photo credit should read KAREN BLEIER/AFP/Getty Images)
Wayne LaPierre, left, executive vice president of the National Rifle Association, speaks during the annual meeting of members at the NRA convention Saturday, April 11, 2015, in Nashville, Tenn. At right is Jim Porter, NRA president. (AP Photo/Mark Humphrey)
Pat Kirchner, of Kankakee, Ill., looks through a pair of binoculars at the National Rifle Association's annual convention in Friday, April 25, 2014 in Indianapolis. (AP Photo/AJ Mast)
Jerry Miller, of Georgetown, Texas, looks over a rifle at the National Rifle Association's annual convention in Friday, April 25, 2014 in Indianapolis. Several potential Republican contenders for president will court gun-rights supporters at the NRA's annual convention Friday. (AP Photo/AJ Mast)
Attendees look over a pistol display at the National Rifle Association's annual convention in Friday, April 25, 2014 in Indianapolis. (AP Photo/AJ Mast)
A convention goer looks at rifle scopes at the 2015 NRA Annual Convention in Nashville, Tennessee on April 11, 2015. This is the civilian version of the Tavor Tar-21, issued to Israeli Defense Forces. AFP PHOTO / KAREN BLEIER (Photo credit should read KAREN BLEIER/AFP/Getty Images)
An exhibitor holds up an Armscor/Rock Island Armory titanium 1911 series prototype handgun at the 2015 NRA Annual Convention in Nashville, Tennessee on April 11, 2015. AFP PHOTO / KAREN BLEIER (Photo credit should read KAREN BLEIER/AFP/Getty Images)
An exhibitor holds up a Bond Arms Ranger II derringer at the 2015 NRA Annual Convention in Nashville, Tennessee on April 11, 2015. AFP PHOTO / KAREN BLEIER (Photo credit should read KAREN BLEIER/AFP/Getty Images)
A convention goer checks out a rifle scope April 11, 2015 at the 2015 NRA Annual Convention in Nashville, Tennessee. AFP PHOTO / KAREN BLEIER (Photo credit should read KAREN BLEIER/AFP/Getty Images)
A girl looks at Sig Sauer P320 handguns April 11, 2015 at the 2015 NRA Annual Convention in Nashville, Tennessee. AFP PHOTO / KAREN BLEIER (Photo credit should read KAREN BLEIER/AFP/Getty Images)
Convention goers look at old west handguns at the A. Uberti booth April 11, 2015 at the 2015 NRA Annual Convention in Nashville, Tennessee. Uberti firearms are exacting replicas, down to the finest detail. Many are improvements over the originals, with the advancement of materials and the use of modern machinery. Today, A. Uberti produces black powder revolvers, cartridge revolvers and cartridge rifles. The firearms set the standard by which Cowboy Action Shooting competitors and big game hunters judge other vintage firearms. AFP PHOTO / KAREN BLEIER (Photo credit should read KAREN BLEIER/AFP/Getty Images)
A woman aims a shotgun April 11, 2015 at the 2015 NRA Annual Convention in Nashville, Tennessee. AFP PHOTO / KAREN BLEIER (Photo credit should read KAREN BLEIER/AFP/Getty Images)
A boy under his parents' supervision, aims a shotgun April 11, 2015 at the 2015 NRA Annual Convention in Nashville, Tennessee. AFP PHOTO / KAREN BLEIER (Photo credit should read KAREN BLEIER/AFP/Getty Images)
Convention goers on the floor April 11, 2015 at the 2015 NRA Annual Convention in Nashville, Tennessee.AFP PHOTO / KAREN BLEIER (Photo credit should read KAREN BLEIER/AFP/Getty Images)
Convention goers look at weapons April 11, 2015 at the 2015 NRA Annual Convention in Nashville, Tennessee. AFP PHOTO / KAREN BLEIER (Photo credit should read KAREN BLEIER/AFP/Getty Images)
An exhibitor holds up a Bond Arms Ranger II derringer at the 2015 NRA Annual Convention in Nashville, Tennessee on April 11, 2015. AFP PHOTO / KAREN BLEIER (Photo credit should read KAREN BLEIER/AFP/Getty Images)
Convention goers look at old west handguns at the A. Uberti booth April 11, 2015 at the 2015 NRA Annual Convention in Nashville, Tennessee. Uberti firearms are exacting replicas, down to the finest detail. Many are improvements over the originals, with the advancement of materials and the use of modern machinery. Today, A. Uberti produces black powder revolvers, cartridge revolvers and cartridge rifles. The firearms set the standard by which Cowboy Action Shooting competitors and big game hunters judge other vintage firearms. AFP PHOTO / KAREN BLEIER (Photo credit should read KAREN BLEIER/AFP/Getty Images)
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"The stories are also for adults, and it's all about safety, and it's for parents to start those conversations," author Amelia Hamilton told CBS.

The first of the series, "Little Red Riding Hood (Has a Gun)," was published in January. The big twist is that just as the wolf is about to make Grandmother his snack, she points her shotgun at him. (He came across Red Riding Hood earlier, who also had a gun.)

"Hansel and Gretel (Have Guns)" puts the famed twosome out hunting when they find the old witch's house. Instead of becoming victims, the siblings free trapped children while training their guns on the witch.

No one gets shot in either of the stories — they are for kids, after all. But the retellings are definitely firing up gun control advocates.

The president of the Brady Campaign to Prevent Gun Violence told the press: "The NRA continues to stoop to new lows in the hopes of shoving guns into America's youngest hands. It must now advertise deadly weapons to kids by perverting childhood classics with no regard whatsoever for the real life carnage happening every day. To be frank, it's pathetic."

According to the The Washington Post, a "Three Little Pigs" rewrite is on its way. One thing's for sure: That wolf will need more than just some hot breath if he's facing three armed little piggies.

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