Kansas college students will be able to bring guns into classrooms

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KS Students to Be Surveyed About Guns on Campus

College campuses in Kansas are preparing for guns in the classrooms. In a little over a year students will be allowed to carry concealed weapons on campus at all six state universities and multiple community colleges and technical schools.

The move has received wide support in the Kansas Legislature which hopes to make schools safer, but college administrators don't agree.

"When a gun is in a school and harm is meant, there is only one thing that is going to stop that, and that is another gun," state Sen. Forrest Knox said during the proposal for the law.

Mike Williams, president of the University of Kansas Faculty Senate, told NPR that administrators and professors are more concerned about violence escalating between students than an active shooter. He also said the law could cause students to fear speaking their minds "because of their worry that someone might react with armed violence instead of thoughtful debate."

Williams isn't the only one to disagree with the law. A survey of more than 20,000 Kansas Board of Regents employees found that 82 percent said would feel less safe if students were allowed to carry guns on campus.

The survey also found these key results:

  • Nearly half of respondents believe that the law would increase campus crime levels
  • 44 percent of respondents are concerned that they will need to change how they conduct their research if guns are allowed on campus
  • More than half of respondents believe that allowing guns on campus would negatively impact the service and outreach work they conduct
  • Two-thirds of respondents said that allowing guns in the classroom limits their academic freedom
  • Three-fifths of respondents are concerned that they will need to change how they teach their course

The schools do have an expensive alternative. To keep guns out of buildings, every door must have both metal detectors and security guards. According to NPR, one small community college estimated the cost for security for that school alone would be about $20 million.

RELATED: Gun rights activists protest across the U.S.

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Gun rights activists across the U.S.
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Kansas college students will be able to bring guns into classrooms
FILE - In this Jan. 26, 2015 file photo, a demonstrator helps hold a large "Come and Take It" banner at a rally in support of open carry gun laws at the Capitol, in Austin, Texas. Texas, the second-most populous state, is joining 44 other states in allowing at least some firearm owners to carry handguns openly in public places. Under the Texas law, guns can be carried by those with licenses and only in holsters. (AP Photo/Eric Gay, File)
FILE - In this Jan. 26, 2015 file photo, Scott Smith, a supporter of open carry gun laws, wears a pistol as he prepares for a rally in support of open carry gun laws at the Capitol, in Austin, Texas. Texas the second-most populous state, is joining 44 other states in allowing at least some firearm owners to carry handguns openly in public places. Under the Texas law, guns can be carried by those with licenses and only in holsters. (AP Photo/Eric Gay, File)
DES MOINES, IA - JUNE 14: Gun rights advocates demonstrate outside the Elwell Family food Center at the Iowa State Fairgrounds where former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton was expected for a campaign event on June 14, 2015 in Des Moines, Iowa. (Photo by Scott Olson/Getty Images)
Trystan Olson, 4, of Spokane, Wash., holds a toy gun as he leans into the barrel of the rifle of his father, Erik Olson, during a rally by gun-rights advocates at the state capitol Saturday, Feb. 7, 2015, in Olympia, Wash. Approximately 50 demonstrators, including a half-dozen small children, protested rules that prohibit openly carrying guns into the House and Senate viewing galleries. (AP Photo/Elaine Thompson)
Protesters pledge allegiance during a rally by gun-rights advocates to protest a new expanded gun background check law in Washington state Saturday, Dec. 13, 2014, in Olympia, Wash. Saturday's protest was called the "I Will Not Comply" rally, and those attending said they will openly exchange firearms in opposition to the state's new voter-approved universal background check law, Initiative 594. The law, which took effect on Dec. 4, requires background checks on all sales and transfers, including private transactions and many loans and gifts. (AP Photo/Elaine Thompson)
Demonstrators with rifles slung across their backs attend a rally by gun-rights advocates to protest a new expanded gun background check law in Washington state Saturday, Dec. 13, 2014, in Olympia, Wash. Saturday's protest was called the "I Will Not Comply" rally, and those attending said they will openly exchange firearms in opposition to the state's new voter-approved universal background check law, Initiative 594. The law, which took effect on Dec. 4, requires background checks on all sales and transfers, including private transactions and many loans and gifts. (AP Photo/Rachel La Corte)
Rob Petersen, of Federal Way, Wash., holds a sign during a rally by gun-rights advocates to protest a new expanded gun background check law in Washington state Saturday, Dec. 13, 2014, in Olympia, Wash. Saturday's protest was called the "I Will Not Comply" rally, and those attending said they will openly exchange firearms in opposition to the state's new voter-approved universal background check law, Initiative 594. The law, which took effect on Dec. 4, requires background checks on all sales and transfers, including private transactions and many loans and gifts. (AP Photo/Elaine Thompson)
OLYMPIA, WASHINGTON - DECEMBER 13: Gun rights activist Mike Vanderboegh speaks during an 'I Will Not Comply' rally at the State Capitol on December 13, 2014 in Olympia, Washington. Gun rights activists protested Washington State's voter-passed initiative that requires background checks for all guns sales and exchanges. (Photo by Stephen Brashear/Getty Images)
MYRTLE BEACH, SC - JANUARY 18: A gun rights advocate shows off a civil war rifle during a break at the South Carolina Tea Party Coalition convention on January 18, 2015 in Myrtle Beach, South Carolina. A variety of conservative presidential hopefuls spoke at the gathering on the second day of a three day event. (Photo by Richard Ellis/Getty Images)
Marie McFadden holds her daughter, Faith, 6, as she prays with armed demonstrators as the group concludes a gun-rights rally at the state capitol Saturday, Feb. 7, 2015, in Olympia, Wash. Approximately 50 demonstrators, including a half-dozen small children, protested rules that prohibit openly carrying guns into the House and Senate viewing galleries. (AP Photo/Elaine Thompson)
OLYMPIA, WASHINGTON - DECEMBER 13: A pair of gun rights activists listen to a speaker during an 'I Will Not Comply' rally at the State Capitol on December 13, 2014 in Olympia, Washington. Gun rights activists protested Washington State's voter-passed initiative that requires background checks for all guns sales and exchanges. (Photo by Stephen Brashear/Getty Images)
OLYMPIA, WASHINGTON - DECEMBER 13: Mike Ladines of Covington, Washington holds a sign while listening to a speaker during an 'I Will Not Comply' rally at the State Capitol on December 13, 2014 in Olympia, Washington. Gun rights activists protested Washington State's voter-passed initiative that requires background checks for all guns sales and exchanges. (Photo by Stephen Brashear/Getty Images)
FILE - In this Jan. 13, 2015 file photo, gun rights advocates carry rifles while protesting outside the Texas Capitol in Austin, Texas. Although Texas has more than 800,000 concealed handgun license holders, it is one of only six states that don’t allow open carry, a ban that dates almost to the Civil War. But open carry looked primed to pass this year with strong support from Gov. Greg Abbott and other top Republicans who have dominated state politics for two decades. (AP Photo/Eric Gay, File)
Demonstrators look on during a rally by gun-rights advocates at the state capitol Saturday, Feb. 7, 2015, in Olympia, Wash. Approximately 50 demonstrators, including a half-dozen small children, protested rules that prohibit openly carrying guns into the House and Senate viewing galleries. (AP Photo/Elaine Thompson)
A Colt M4 gun and a button that reads "I Vote - Proud Washington Gun Owner," are displayed by Mark Ramirez, of Bainbridge Island, Wash., as he takes part in a gun-rights rally, Thursday, Jan. 15, 2015, at the Capitol in Olympia, Wash., in opposition to the state's Initiative 594, which requires - with only a few exceptions - background checks on all gun sales and transfers. (AP Photo/Ted S. Warren)
Gun owners display their weapons on the steps of the Legislative Building during a gun-rights rally, Thursday, Jan. 15, 2015, at the Capitol in Olympia, Wash. The protestors were demonstrating against the state's Initiative 594, which requires - with only a few exceptions - background checks on all gun sales and transfers. (AP Photo/Ted S. Warren)
Protestors, including Mark Ramirez, center, of Bainbridge Island, Wash., wearing his Colt M4 gun, take part in a gun-rights rally, Thursday, Jan. 15, 2015, at the Capitol in Olympia, Wash, in opposition to the state's Initiative 594, which requires - with only a few exceptions - background checks on all gun sales and transfers. (AP Photo/Ted S. Warren)
Matt Mulder, left, holds an AR-15 rifle as he has his photo taken while Mary Hath Spokane, center, gives info to Steel Brooks after having her picture taken during a rally by gun-rights advocates to protest a new expanded gun background check law in Washington state Saturday, Dec. 13, 2014, in Olympia, Wash. Saturday's protest was called the "I Will Not Comply" rally, and those attending said they will openly exchange firearms in opposition to the state's new voter-approved universal background check law, Initiative 594. The law, which took effect on Dec. 4, requires background checks on all sales and transfers, including private transactions and many loans and gifts. (AP Photo/Elaine Thompson)
Members of Texas law enforcement wait for a news conference to begin Wednesday, May 27, 2015, in Austin, Texas. Law enforcement groups from across Texas are demanding Gov. Greg Abbott veto a handgun open carry bill if they can't strip out a restriction on police powers to question people carrying weapons.(AP Photo/Eric Gay)
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