Cuddly panda cubs pummel camera in adorable video

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Giant Panda Cub Loves the Camera

A couple of panda cubs were playing in the grass when they were caught on camera committing an act of too much cuteness.

The Chengdu Research Base of Giant Panda Breeding in China's Sichuan province features a live stream, which captured the adorable moment that was shared on Facebook by one of China's largest newspapers, People's Daily.

In the video, the cuddly little cubs come trotting down a grassy slope.

And then in perfectly endearing unison, tumble to the ground.

One of the cubs sniffs and discovers what may be a play toy, and gives it a swat and sends the camera for a spin.

The bear tosses the camera around as it investigates the unusual object -- and then gives it a bite to see how it tastes.

Watch the delightful little cubs in action:

See images of baby pandas that were born at the Smithsonian's National Zoolast year:

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Baby Pandas born at Smithsonian
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Cuddly panda cubs pummel camera in adorable video

Mei Xiang in her den with her cub on Sept. 21, 2015. (Photo via Smithsonian's National Zoo)

In this photo provided by the Smithsonian's National Zoo, one of the giant panda cubs is examined by veterinarians after being born at Smithsonian's National Zoo on Saturday, Aug. 22, 2015, in Washington. The National Zoo in Washington says its adult female panda has had twins. (Becky Malinsky/Smithsonian's National Zoo via AP) 
WASHINGTON, DC - AUGUST 23: In this handout provided by the Smithsonian's National Zoo, the second of two newborn Giant Pandas born August 22 is cared for by members of the panda team at the Smithsonian's National Zoo and Conservation Biology Institute August 23, 2015 in Washington, DC. The team is swapping each cub with the mother Mei Xiang, allowing each to nurse, while the other is bottle-fed and kept warm in an incubator. (Photo by Smithsonian's National Zoo via Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC - AUGUST 23: In this handout provided by the Smithsonian's National Zoo, the second of two newborn Giant Pandas born August 22 is cared for by members of the panda team at the Smithsonian's National Zoo and Conservation Biology Institute August 23, 2015 in Washington, DC. The team is swapping each cub with the mother Mei Xiang, allowing each to nurse, while the other is bottle-fed and kept warm in an incubator. (Photo by Smithsonian's National Zoo via Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC - AUGUST 23: In this handout provided by the Smithsonian's National Zoo, the second of two newborn Giant Pandas born August 22 is cared for by members of the panda team at the Smithsonian's National Zoo and Conservation Biology Institute August 23, 2015 in Washington, DC. The team is swapping each cub with the mother Mei Xiang, allowing each to nurse, while the other is bottle-fed and kept warm in an incubator. (Photo by Smithsonian's National Zoo via Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC - AUGUST 24: In this handout provided by the Smithsonian's National Zoo, one of two newborn Giant Pandas born August 22 is cared for by a member of the panda team at the Smithsonian's National Zoo and Conservation Biology Institute August 24, 2015 in Washington, DC. The team is swapping each cub with the mother Mei Xiang, allowing each to nurse, while the other is bottle-fed and kept warm in an incubator. (Photo by Smithsonian's National Zoo via Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC - AUGUST 23: In this handout provided by the Smithsonian's National Zoo, the second of two newborn Giant Pandas born August 22 is cared for by members of the panda team at the Smithsonian's National Zoo and Conservation Biology Institute August 23, 2015 in Washington, DC. The team is swapping each cub with the mother Mei Xiang, allowing each to nurse, while the other is bottle-fed and kept warm in an incubator. (Photo by Smithsonian's National Zoo via Getty Images)
In this handout photo provided by the Smithsonian’s National Zoo shows keeper Stacey Tabellario bottle feeding the smaller of the two giant panda cubs at the zoo in Washington. The zoo said the smaller Giant Panda cub died Wednesday after three and a half days. (Shellie Pick/Smithsonian’s National Zoo via AP) MANDATORY CREDIT

Mei Xiang left her den Saturday, Sept. 5, around 3:10 p.m. to eat and drink. She ate more bamboo than she has in previous excursions since giving birth. Keepers expect Mei Xiang to gradually spend more time away from the den eating and drinking as the cub grows. While Mei Xiang was eating, veterinarians and keepers took the opportunity to give the cub another quick checkup. He weighed 409.6 grams, which was 119 grams more than he weighed on Sept. 2. His 297 percent weight gain is normal for a cub his age. Cubs at this stage usually gain between 40 and 50 grams per day. Veterinarians also listened to his heart and lungs, which all sounded normal. His eyes are still closed, which is normal. Cubs’ eyes generally open when they are 6 to 8 weeks old. He also had a full belly at the time of the exam and appeared to be healthy. (Photo via Smithsonian's National Zoo)

Mei Xiang and her cub on Sept. 3. (Photo via Smithsonian's National Zoo)

Mei Xiang sleeping in her den with her cub Sept. 18, 2015. (Photo via Smithsonian's National Zoo)

Mei Xiang left the den around 9 a.m., about 30 minutes after keepers replenished food in her enclosure on Sept. 12. She spent 15 minutes away from the cub, during which time he could be seen on the panda cam scooting around in circles. Keepers noted that the shape of his back saddle, the black marking on a panda’s back, resembles Tian Tian’s, his father. (Photo via Smithsonian's National Zoo)

Keepers weighed the giant panda cub Sept. 14, when Mei Xiang left her den. He weighed 881.5 grams or 1.9 pounds. (Photo via Erika Bauer/Smithsonian's National Zoo)

At a veterinary exam Sept. 17, the cub measured 31 centimeters from his head to the tip of his tail. From his head to the base of his tail he measured 27 centimeters. His right front leg was 10 centimeters long and his right hind leg was 9 centimeters long. Veterinarians reported that he has an excellent range of motion and is able to push up onto his front legs. Keepers have seen him scooting around the den using his front legs, but he is not walking yet. (Photo via Amy Enchelmeyer/Smithosonian's National Zoo)

At a veterinary exam Sept. 17, the cub measured 31 centimeters from his head to the tip of his tail. From his head to the base of his tail he measured 27 centimeters. His right front leg was 10 centimeters long and his right hind leg was 9 centimeters long. Veterinarians reported that he has an excellent range of motion and is able to push up onto his front legs. Keepers have seen him scooting around the den using his front legs, but he is not walking yet. (Photo via Amy Enchelmeyer/Smithsonian's National Zoo)

Zoo volunteer and "big panda fan" Mara Strock wipes her eyes at right while listening to the announcement of the death of one of the new panda cubs during a news conference at the Smithsonian's National Zoo in Washington, Wednesday, Aug. 26, 2015. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)
Visitors to the Smithsonian's National Zoo listen during an announcement about the death of one of the new panda cubs during a news conference at the Zoo in Washington, Wednesday, Aug. 26, 2015. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)
The Smithsonian National Zoo's Giant Panda Mei Xiang, mother of panda youngster Bao Bao who was born Aug. 23, 2013, sleeps in the indoor habitat at the zoo in Washington, Wednesday, Aug. 12, 2015. The zoo says that the hormone levels of its adult female panda were rising, a sign that she might be pregnant. Mei Xiang, one of the two adult giant pandas which arrived here from China on Dec. 6, 2000, has started to show a secondary rise in her urinary progesterone levels since July 20 after she was artificially inseminated on April 26 and 27, the zoo said in a statement. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)
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