New book reveals how social media has changed the way girls grow up

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One of the most dominant forces in the lives of girls coming of age in America today is social media.

Author Nancy Jo Sales asks what the influx of social media that continues to flood the phones and computers of young people across the U.S. is this doing to an entire generation of young women.

As the Times' review explains, Sales offers an "alarming" look into the secret online lives of teenagers in her new book "American Girls":

Not only is it alarming that children are increasingly exposed to pornography online, but Ms. Sales also notes that much of the sexual material they see "is characterized by what looks like violence against women" — violence "in which men dominate and control women, insult them, and sometimes hurt them physically."

The book made its debut on The New York Times Best Seller list for the week of March 20th.

This week a few new releases have shot up to the top of the nonfiction list while some heavy hitters continue to fly off the shelves.

"Between the World and Me," a book by author Ta-Nehisi Coates which a profound work that pivots from the biggest questions about American history and ideals to the most intimate concerns of a father for his son shot back into the top five on the bestsellers list this week.

While the gut wrenching tale in "A Mother's Reckoning" which offers a powerful account by the mother of one of the Columbine shooters, chronicling her battle with grief and shame ever since that infamous day in April 1999, remains high on the list in its third week.

Click through the nonfiction New York Times Best Sellers list below:

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New book reveals how social media has changed the way girls grow up

No. 15 on NY Times Bestsellers list nonfiction: 

The Informant: A True Story, $9.55

From an award-winning New York Times investigative reporter comes an outrageous story of greed, corruption, and conspiracy—which left the FBI and Justice Department counting on the cooperation of one man.

No. 14 on NY Times Bestsellers list nonfiction: 

The Road to Little Dribbling: Adventures of an American in Britain, $18.12

Twenty years ago, Bill Bryson went on a trip around Britain to discover and celebrate that green and pleasant land. The result was Notes from a Small Island, a true classic and one of the bestselling travel books ever written. Now he has traveled about Britain again, by bus and train and rental car and on foot, to see what has changed—and what hasn’t.

No. 13 on NY Times Bestsellers list nonfiction: 

White Dresses: A Memoir of Love and Secrets, Mothers and Daughters, $10.33

In this riveting, poignant memoir of  three generations of women and the white dresses that adorned them—television producer Mary Pflum Peterson recounts a journey through loss and redemption, and her battle to rescue her mother, a former nun, from compulsive hoarding.

No. 12 on NY Times Bestsellers list nonfiction: 

American Girls: Social Media and the Secret Lives of Teenagers, $18.66

Instagram. Whisper. Yik Yak. Vine. YouTube. Kik. Ask.fm. Tinder. The dominant force in the lives of girls coming of age in America today is social media. What it is doing to an entire generation of young women is the subject of award-winning Vanity Fair writer Nancy Jo Sales’s riveting and explosive American Girls.

No. 11 on NY Times Bestsellers list nonfiction: 

Rosemary: The Hidden Kennedy Daughter, $16.07

Joe and Rose Kennedy’s strikingly beautiful daughter Rosemary attended exclusive schools, was presented as a debutante to the Queen of England, and traveled the world with her high-spirited sisters. And yet, Rosemary was intellectually disabled — a secret fiercely guarded by her powerful and glamorous family. 

No. 10 on NY Times Bestsellers list nonfiction: 

Alexander Hamilton​, $13.06

In the first full-length biography of Alexander Hamilton in decades, Ron Chernow tells the riveting story of a man who overcame all odds to shape, inspire, and scandalize the newborn America. According to historian Joseph Ellis, Alexander Hamilton is “a robust full-length portrait, in my view the best ever written, of the most brilliant, charismatic and dangerous founder of them all.”

No. 9 on NY Times Bestsellers list nonfiction: 

The Boys in the Boat: Nine Americans and Their Epic Quest for Gold at the 1936 Berlin Olympics, $9.15

For readers of Unbroken, out of the depths of the Depression comes an irresistible story about beating the odds and finding hope in the most desperate of times—the improbable, intimate account of how nine working-class boys from the American West showed the world at the 1936 Olympics in Berlin what true grit really meant.

No. 8 on NY Times Bestsellers list nonfiction: 

A Mother's Reckoning: Living in the Aftermath of Tragedy, $12.14

On April 20, 1999, Eric Harris and Dylan Klebold walked into Columbine High School in Littleton, Colorado. Over the course of minutes, they would kill twelve students and a teacher and wound twenty-four others before taking their own lives.

No. 7 on NY Times Bestsellers list nonfiction: 

Evicted: Poverty and Profit in the American City, $16.83

n this brilliant, heartbreaking book, Matthew Desmond takes us into the poorest neighborhoods of Milwaukee to tell the story of eight families on the edge. Arleen is a single mother trying to raise her two sons on the $20 a month she has left after paying for their rundown apartment. Scott is a gentle nurse consumed by a heroin addiction.

No. 6 on NY Times Bestsellers list nonfiction: 

Dark Money: The Hidden History of the Billionaires Behind the Rise of the Radical Right, $18.68

Why is America living in an age of profound economic inequality? Why, despite the desperate need to address climate change, have even modest environmental efforts been defeated again and again? Why have protections for employees been decimated? Why do hedge-fund billionaires pay a far lower tax rate than middle-class workers?

No. 5 on NY Times Bestsellers list nonfiction: 

Playing to the Edge: American Intelligence in the Age of Terror, $17.59

An unprecedented high-level master narrative of America's intelligence wars, from the only person ever to helm both CIA and NSA, at a time of heinous new threats and wrenching change.

No. 4 on NY Times Bestsellers list nonfiction: 

A Man Called Intrepid: The Incredible True Story of the Master Spy Who Helped Win World War II, $8.47

A Man Called Intrepid is the account of the world’s first integrated intelligence operation and of its master, William Stephenson. Codenamed INTREPID by Winston Churchill, Stephenson was charged with establishing—and running—a vast, worldwide intelligence network to challenge the terrifying force of Nazi Germany. Nothing less than the fate of Britain and the free world hung in the balance as INTREPID covertly set about stalling the Nazis by any means necessary.

No. 3 on NY Times Bestsellers list nonfiction: 

Between the World and Me, $9.83

In a profound work that pivots from the biggest questions about American history and ideals to the most intimate concerns of a father for his son, Ta-Nehisi Coates offers a powerful new framework for understanding our nation’s history and current crisis.

No. 2 on NY Times Bestsellers list nonfiction: 

Seven Brief Lessons on Physics, $11.53

Seven Brief Lessons on Physics is a book about the joy of discovery. Carlo Rovelli brings a playful, entertaining, and mind-bending introduction to modern physics, offering surprising—and surprisingly easy to grasp—explanations of Einstein's general relativity, quantum mechanics, elementary particles, gravity, black holes, the complex architecture of the universe, and the role humans play in this weird and wonderful world. 

No. 1 on NY Times Bestsellers list nonfiction: 

When Breath Becomes Air, $15.00

At the age of thirty-six, on the verge of completing a decade’s worth of training as a neurosurgeon, Paul Kalanithi was diagnosed with stage IV lung cancer. One day he was a doctor treating the dying, and the next he was a patient struggling to live.

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