Here's how you may be receiving part of $400M that Apple owes consumers

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Apple to Appeal E-Book Price Fixing Ruling

The Supreme Court is laying down the hammer to the tune of a solid "no" in Apple's appeal request for the ebook incident that will cost the company nearly $450M. And in this case, it's transparent as to where exactly that money is set to go: directly back in to the hands of customers.

Apple's also made headlines recently in a different court case:

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Here's how you may be receiving part of $400M that Apple owes consumers
WASHINGTON, USA - MARCH 1: Apples General Council Bruce Sewell testifies before a House Judiciary Committee Hearing on Apple's denial of the FBI's request to provide a way to hack into one of the San Bernardino terrorists phones at the Capitol in Washington, USA on March 1, 2016. (Photo by Samuel Corum/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, USA - MARCH 1: FBI Director James Comey testifies before a House Judiciary Committee Hearing on Apple's denial of the FBI's request to provide a way to hack into one of the San Bernardino terrorists phones at the Capitol in Washington, USA on March 1, 2016. (Photo by Samuel Corum/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, USA - MARCH 1: FBI Director James Comey testifies before a House Judiciary Committee Hearing on Apple's denial of the FBI's request to provide a way to hack into one of the San Bernardino terrorists phones at the Capitol in Washington, USA on March 1, 2016. (Photo by Samuel Corum/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, USA - MARCH 1: Apples General Council Bruce Sewell testifies before a House Judiciary Committee Hearing on Apple's denial of the FBI's request to provide a way to hack into one of the San Bernardino terrorists phones at the Capitol in Washington, USA on March 1, 2016. (Photo by Samuel Corum/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, USA - MARCH 1: Apples General Council Bruce Sewell testifies before a House Judiciary Committee Hearing on Apple's denial of the FBI's request to provide a way to hack into one of the San Bernardino terrorists phones at the Capitol in Washington, USA on March 1, 2016. (Photo by Samuel Corum/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, USA - MARCH 1: (from left to right) Bruce Sewell, Apples General Counsel, Susan Landau, Professor, Worcester Polytechnic Institute, and Cyrus Vance, District Attorney, New York County are sworn in during a House Judiciary Committee Hearing on the Apple's denial of the FBI's request to provide a way to hack into one of the San Bernardino terrorists phones at the Capitol in Washington, USA on March 1, 2016. (Photo by Samuel Corum/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, USA - MARCH 1: Apples General Council Bruce Sewell sets up an iPad Pro before testifying before a House Judiciary Committee Hearing on Apple's denial of the FBI's request to provide a way to hack into one of the San Bernardino terrorists phones at the Capitol in Washington, USA on March 1, 2016. (Photo by Samuel Corum/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, USA - MARCH 1: Apples General Council Bruce Sewell talks with colleagues in the chambers before testifying at a House Judiciary Committee Hearing on Apple's denial of the FBI's request to provide a way to hack into one of the San Bernardino terrorists phones at the Capitol in Washington, USA on March 1, 2016. (Photo by Samuel Corum/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, USA - MARCH 1: FBI Director James Comey testifies before a House Judiciary Committee Hearing on Apple's denial of the FBI's request to provide a way to hack into one of the San Bernardino terrorists phones at the Capitol in Washington, USA on March 1, 2016. (Photo by Samuel Corum/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, USA - MARCH 1: FBI Director James Comey is sworn in during a House Judiciary Committee Hearing on Apple's denial of the FBI's request to provide a way to hack into one of the San Bernardino terrorists phones at the Capitol in Washington, USA on March 1, 2016. (Photo by Samuel Corum/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC - MARCH 01: Rep. Trey Gowdy (R-SC) listens to testimony from Federal Bureau of Investigation Director James Comey during a House Judiciary Committee hearing titled 'The Encryption Tightrope: Balancing Americans' Security and Privacy,' on Capitol Hill, March 1, 2016 in Washington, DC. Apple is fighting a court order requiring them to assist the FBI in opening the encrypted iPhone belonging to San Bernardino shooter Syed Farook. (Photo by Drew Angerer/Getty Images)
New York District Attorney Cyrus Vance Jr. testifies before the House Judiciary Committee on the encryption of the iPhone belonging to one of the San Bernardino attackers on Capitol Hill in Washington, DC, on March 1, 2016. / AFP / Nicholas Kamm (Photo credit should read NICHOLAS KAMM/AFP/Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC - MARCH 1: Bruce Sewell, Senior Vice President and General Counsel at Apple, Inc., arrives to testify at a House Judiciary Committee hearing titled 'The Encryption Tightrope: Balancing Americans' Security and Privacy,' on Capitol Hill, March 1, 2016 in Washington, DC. Apple is fighting a court order requiring them to assist the FBI in opening the encrypted iPhone belonging to San Bernardino shooter Syed Farook. (Drew Angerer/Getty Images)
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Quick review: Apple, Inc. was caught in an antitrust suit back in 2010 when the company was caught persuading and conspiring with five major publishers (including HarperCollins and Penguin Group) to set (and raise) ebook prices, instead of prices being set by retailers.

SEE ALSO: 10 Steve Jobs quotes that will absolutely move you

Apple was seeking to gain control of the ebook sales market that was primarily dominated by Amazon at the time, which was selling best sellers for as low as $9.99.

The verdict reached in 2013 stated that Apple would pay back $400M of a $450M (the other $50M to cover various legal fees) to ebook consumers if the settlement case stood as it was. The other publishers involved settled the case, but Apple appealed the verdict, which was promptly rejected as of Monday morning.

In a statement to the public, Assistant Attorney General Bill Baer asserted that:

"Apple's liability for knowingly conspiring with book publishers to raise the prices of ebooks is settled once and for all."

Apple's $450M payout will come in addition to the $166M that's already been paid out by the other major publishers in their settlements.

Consumers will be mostly credited back funds in the form of direct credits to their ebook accounts, just as they have been with the other publishers the past few years.

The Supreme Court did not comment on why Apple's appeal had been refused, but strongly noted "Consumers will be made whole."

RELATED: The 11 greatest moments Apple's ever had on stage

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The 11 greatest moments Apple's ever had on stage
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Here's how you may be receiving part of $400M that Apple owes consumers

1. When Jobs returned to Apple in 1997, the crowd erupted with applause and cheer as he walked back on stage for the first time.

(Photo via YouTube)

2. The introduction of the first iMac was a milestone for Apple. It was the first computer that seemed cool and not focused on the enterprise. The crowd ate it up.

(Photo via YouTube)

3. The crowd went nuts when Jobs demonstrated how WiFi works back in 1999.

(Photo via YouTube)

4. Jobs showed the world the iPod for the first time at an intimate event in 2001.

(Photo via YouTube)

5. Conference attendees went ballistic when apple unveiled the iPhone in 2007.

(Photo via YouTube)

6. He even prank called Starbucks on stage and ordered 4000 lattes to show how well phone calls worked on the iPhone.

(Photo via YouTube)

7. Apple debuted the iPad in 2010 at half the price most people expected.

(Photo via YouTube)

8. One of Jobs' most memorable "one more thing" announcements was the first Facetime demo in 2010.

(Photo via YouTube)

9. Jobs perfectly summed up the company's approach to mobile with a simple image of a street sign.

(Photo via YouTube)

10. Apple CEO Tim Cook used Jobs' famous "one more thing" line for the first time when he unveiled the Apple Watch.

(Photo via YouTube)

11. When Apple bought Beats Electronics for $3 billion last year, Dr. Dre and renowned record executive Jimmy Lovine were brought on as official Apple employees.

(Photo by Andy Kropa/Invision/AP, File)

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