Elon Musk just tweeted some bad and good news about SpaceX's historic rocket-landing attempt

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SpaceX Successfully Launches Satellite but Misses the Landing

On Friday evening, SpaceX saw its second successful launch of the year out of Cape Canaveral in Florida

The launch marked the start of two different missions, but only one would pan out:

  1. Ferry the SES-9 communications satellite into Earth's orbit.
  2. Land a rocket on board an ocean platform in the Atlantic Ocean.

While the first mission was a wonderful success, the second was decidedly not.

Shortly after the launch, SpaceX founder and CEO Elon Musk tweeted that the rocket took a hard landing on the ship, meaning that it came in too fast and, in all probability, likely exploded on the platform.

But Musk also offered a thread of hope:

Landing rockets isn't just a fancy stunt for SpaceX. It's a critical goal that will prove whether or not the company can reuse the same rocket for different launches and save itself the cost of building a new multimillion-dollar rocket for each mission.

If reusable rockets prove a viable approach to spaceflight, the cost of a single launch could be drastically reduced.

While this is a missed opportunity to prove the revolutionary reusability of its Falcon 9 rockets, SpaceX — as Musk mentioned — is not surprised by this outcome.

What's more, there's hope for a more successful landing with SpaceX's next launch, which is scheduled for a yet-to-be-announced day this April.

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RELATED: Images from the SpaceX's resupply mission:

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Elon Musk just tweeted some bad and good news about SpaceX's historic rocket-landing attempt
The SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket and Dragon spacecraft breaks apart shortly after liftoff at the Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Cape Canaveral, Fla., Sunday, June 28, 2015. The rocket was carrying supplies to the International Space Station. (AP Photo/John Raoux)
Space X's Falcon 9 rocket as it lifts off from space launch complex 40 at Cape Canaveral, Florida June 28, 2015 with a Dragon CRS7 spacecraft. The unmanned SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket exploded minutes after liftoff from Cape Canaveral, Florida, following what was meant to be a routine cargo mission to the International Space Station. 'The vehicle has broken up,' said NASA commentator George Diller, after NASA television broadcast images of the white rocket falling to pieces. 'At this point it is not clear to the launch team exactly what happened.' The disaster was the first of its kind for the California-based company headed by Internet entrepreneur Elon Musk, who has led a series of successful launches even as competitor Orbital Sciences lost one of its rockets in an explosion in October, and a Russian supply ships was lost in April. SpaceX's live webcast of the launch went silent about two minutes 19 seconds into the flight, and soon after the rocket could be seen exploding and small pieces tumbling back toward Earth. AFP PHOTO/ BRUCE WEAVER (Photo credit should read BRUCE WEAVER/AFP/Getty Images)
Space X's Falcon 9 rocket as it lifts off from space launch complex 40 at Cape Canaveral, Florida June 28, 2015 with a Dragon CRS7 spacecraft. The unmanned SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket exploded minutes after liftoff from Cape Canaveral, Florida, following what was meant to be a routine cargo mission to the International Space Station. 'The vehicle has broken up,' said NASA commentator George Diller, after NASA television broadcast images of the white rocket falling to pieces. 'At this point it is not clear to the launch team exactly what happened.' The disaster was the first of its kind for the California-based company headed by Internet entrepreneur Elon Musk, who has led a series of successful launches even as competitor Orbital Sciences lost one of its rockets in an explosion in October, and a Russian supply ships was lost in April. SpaceX's live webcast of the launch went silent about two minutes 19 seconds into the flight, and soon after the rocket could be seen exploding and small pieces tumbling back toward Earth. AFP PHOTO/ BRUCE WEAVER (Photo credit should read BRUCE WEAVER/AFP/Getty Images)
Space X's Falcon 9 rocket as it lifts off from space launch complex 40 at Cape Canaveral, Florida June 28, 2015 with a Dragon CRS7 spacecraft. The unmanned SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket exploded minutes after liftoff from Cape Canaveral, Florida, following what was meant to be a routine cargo mission to the International Space Station. 'The vehicle has broken up,' said NASA commentator George Diller, after NASA television broadcast images of the white rocket falling to pieces. 'At this point it is not clear to the launch team exactly what happened.' The disaster was the first of its kind for the California-based company headed by Internet entrepreneur Elon Musk, who has led a series of successful launches even as competitor Orbital Sciences lost one of its rockets in an explosion in October, and a Russian supply ships was lost in April. SpaceX's live webcast of the launch went silent about two minutes 19 seconds into the flight, and soon after the rocket could be seen exploding and small pieces tumbling back toward Earth. AFP PHOTO/ BRUCE WEAVER (Photo credit should read BRUCE WEAVER/AFP/Getty Images)
Space X's Falcon 9 rocket as it lifts off from space launch complex 40 at Cape Canaveral, Florida June 28, 2015 with a Dragon CRS7 spacecraft. The unmanned SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket exploded minutes after liftoff from Cape Canaveral, Florida, following what was meant to be a routine cargo mission to the International Space Station. 'The vehicle has broken up,' said NASA commentator George Diller, after NASA television broadcast images of the white rocket falling to pieces. 'At this point it is not clear to the launch team exactly what happened.' The disaster was the first of its kind for the California-based company headed by Internet entrepreneur Elon Musk, who has led a series of successful launches even as competitor Orbital Sciences lost one of its rockets in an explosion in October, and a Russian supply ships was lost in April. SpaceX's live webcast of the launch went silent about two minutes 19 seconds into the flight, and soon after the rocket could be seen exploding and small pieces tumbling back toward Earth. AFP PHOTO/ BRUCE WEAVER (Photo credit should read BRUCE WEAVER/AFP/Getty Images)
The SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket and Dragon spacecraft breaks apart shortly after liftoff at the Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Cape Canaveral, Fla., Sunday, June 28, 2015. The rocket was carrying supplies to the International Space Station. (AP Photo/John Raoux)
The SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket and Dragon spacecraft breaks apart shortly after liftoff from the Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Cape Canaveral, Fla., Sunday, June 28, 2015. The rocket was carrying supplies to the International Space Station. (AP Photo/John Raoux)
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