Koch brothers will not use funds to block Trump nomination

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The Party of Trump

NEW YORK, March 2 (Reuters) - The Koch brothers, the most powerful conservative mega donors in the United States, will not use their $400 million political arsenal to block Republican front-runner Donald Trump's path to the presidential nomination, a spokesman told Reuters on Wednesday.

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"We have no plans to get involved in the primary," said James Davis, spokesman for Freedom Partners, the Koch brothers' political umbrella group. He would not elaborate on what the billionaire industrialists' strategy would be for the Nov. 8 general election to succeed Democratic President Barack Obama.

Donors and media reports have speculated since a Koch brothers summit in January that they would launch a "Trump Intervention," which would involve deploying the Kochs' vast political network to target the billionaire businessman and former reality TV star in hopes of removing him from the Republican race.

Related: See photos from a recent Trump rally:

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Donald Trump rally at Valdosta State University
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Koch brothers will not use funds to block Trump nomination
Colton Jordan, 5, of Cario, Ga., dresses like Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump as he arrives with his family for rally at Valdosta State University in Valdosta, Ga., Monday, Feb. 29, 2016. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)
VALDOSTA, GA - FEBRUARY 29: People cheer as republican presidential candidate Donald Trump speaks during a campaign event at the Valdosta State University in Valdosta, GA on Monday Feb. 29, 2016. (Photo by Jabin Botsford/The Washington Post via Getty Images)
VALDOSTA, GA - FEBRUARY 29: Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump speaks during a campaign event at the Valdosta State University in Valdosta, GA on Monday Feb. 29, 2016. (Photo by Jabin Botsford/The Washington Post via Getty Images)
VALDOSTA, GA - FEBRUARY 29: Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump speaks during a campaign event at the Valdosta State University in Valdosta, GA on Monday Feb. 29, 2016. (Photo by Jabin Botsford/The Washington Post via Getty Images)
VALDOSTA, GA - FEBRUARY 29: Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump speaks during a campaign event at the Valdosta State University in Valdosta, GA on Monday Feb. 29, 2016. (Photo by Jabin Botsford/The Washington Post via Getty Images)
VALDOSTA, GA - FEBRUARY 29: Patrons are seen lined up outside to listen to republican presidential candidate Donald Trump as he speaks during a campaign event at the Valdosta State University in Valdosta, GA on Monday Feb. 29, 2016. (Photo by Jabin Botsford/The Washington Post via Getty Images)
VALDOSTA, GA - FEBRUARY 29: Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump stops and turns to the press as he greets the crowd after speaking at a campaign event at the Valdosta State University in Valdosta, GA on Monday Feb. 29, 2016. (Photo by Jabin Botsford/The Washington Post via Getty Images)
VALDOSTA, GA - FEBRUARY 29: Supporters reach for signatures, handshakes, and photos as republican presidential candidate Donald Trump greets the crowd after speaking at a campaign event at the Valdosta State University in Valdosta, GA on Monday Feb. 29, 2016. (Photo by Jabin Botsford/The Washington Post via Getty Images)
A member of the audience waits to shake hands with Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump as he greets people after speaking at a rally at Valdosta State University in Valdosta, Ga., Monday, Feb. 29, 2016. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)
Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump speaks at a rally at Valdosta State University in Valdosta, Ga., Monday, Feb. 29, 2016. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)
Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump, accompanied by NASCAR Chairman and CEO Brian France, left, invites up former NASCAR driver Bill Elliott, right, to speak at a rally at Valdosta State University in Valdosta, Ga., Monday, Feb. 29, 2016. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)
A member of the audience cheers as Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump speaks at a rally at Valdosta State University in Valdosta, Ga., Monday, Feb. 29, 2016. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)
VALDOSTA, GA - FEBRUARY 29: Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump speaks during a campaign event at the Valdosta State University in Valdosta, GA on Monday Feb. 29, 2016. (Photo by Jabin Botsford/The Washington Post via Getty Images)
VALDOSTA, GA - FEBRUARY 29: Supporters reach for signatures, handshakes, and photos as republican presidential candidate Donald Trump greets the crowd after speaking at a campaign event at the Valdosta State University in Valdosta, GA on Monday Feb. 29, 2016. (Photo by Jabin Botsford/The Washington Post via Getty Images)
Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump speaks at a rally at Valdosta State University in Valdosta, Ga., Monday, Feb. 29, 2016. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)
Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump speaks at a rally at Valdosta State University in Valdosta, Ga., Monday, Feb. 29, 2016. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)
Frances Raines, 14, left, and Adylein hunt, 13, right, hold a poster that reads "Trump is my Dad" as they wait for Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump to arrive for rally at Valdosta State University in Valdosta, Ga., Monday, Feb. 29, 2016. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)
Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump speaks at a rally at Valdosta State University in Valdosta, Ga., Monday, Feb. 29, 2016. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)
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Many Republican party elites and business backers are eager to see Trump, a political outsider who has tapped into America's rising anti-establishment sentiment, fail in his bid for the nomination.

But with Trump racking up a series of sizeable wins in the early nominating contests, there is a growing sense of inevitability he will win the party's mantle.

Three sources close to the Koch brothers, who oppose Trump's protectionist trade rhetoric and views on immigration, said the Kochs were concerned they had not yet seen any attack on Trump stick.

The brothers are also smarting from the millions they pumped into the 2012 Republican presidential bids of Newt Gingrich and Mitt Romney, only to see both candidacies fail, the sources said.

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