5 killer perks of working at Starbucks

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Starbucks Is Going to Pay for All Its Employees to Go to College

The company that brought you the Frappuccino has been making headlines recently. From announcing plans to open locations in Italy by Spring 2017, to a new roll-out plan that tightens the company's reward program rules, there's no question that Starbucks is amid a company facelift of sorts.

In recent years, Starbucks has also made big changes in the realm of employee perks and benefits. We must say, working at this company seems like a pretty sweet deal, whether you like your coffee with sugar or not.

SEE ALSO: Starbucks CEO says he's gravely concerned about American politics

Here are our top 5 perks that the coffee enterprise offers:

Free stuff

Each week, employees are allowed to choose either a pound of coffee beans (whatever blend they prefer), a box of K-Cup® Pods or a box of their favorite flavor of Tazo tea, to take home. Employees are also entitled to a 30 percent discount on all Starbucks food and drink.

Stocks on stocks

Employees are entered in to the company's "Bean Stock" program, which offers them shares of the company through Restricted Stock Units (which become actual company shares over time).

So long as employees stay employed for one full year (fully, without breaks or prolonged absences), they're eligible to receive the first 50 percent of the stock grant after that first year, followed by the second half after their second year working for Starbucks.

Once the employee owns the full share, they are permitted to do whatever they want with them.

"Partners"

Partially having to do with the stock ownership and partially in an effort to make everyone in the company feel more united and equally as valued, Starbucks management refers to their employees as "partners".

Here's what different Starbucks locations look like around the world:

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Starbucks locations around the world
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5 killer perks of working at Starbucks
A woman walks into a Starbucks Coffee, Monday, Jan. 11, 2016, in New York. (AP Photo/Mark Lennihan)
People walk past the first Starbucks to open in Bogota, Colombia, Wednesday, July 16, 2014. The three-floor coffee house in Bogota is the first of 50 that the Seattle-based company plans to open here in the next five years. (AP Photo/Fernando Vergara)
Baristas Truong Nguyen, left, and Ben Ruthruff, right, talk with customers near a display of special Seattle Seahawks Starbucks cards on Wednesday, Oct. 23, 2013, at a Starbucks store in Seattle. The Seahawks began a one-week fund-raising campaign Wednesday with Starbucks to benefit Seahawks head coach Pete Carroll's A Better Seattle program, which seeks to reach at-risk youth and prevent gang violence. (AP Photo/Ted S. Warren)
Starbucks CEO Howard Schultz poses for the photographer before a press conference in Bangkok, Thailand, Monday, May 13, 2013. Schultz, visiting Bangkok this week to mark the coffee giant's 15 year anniversary of opening in Thailand, said Monday the coffee chain's first stores in India and Vietnam have been received positively and it might soon be time to give Myanmar a shot too. (AP Photo/Sakchai Lalit)
Two customers sit outside a Starbucks vandalized by angry protestors in opposition to Mexico's newly sworn-in president, in Mexico City, Saturday, Dec. 1, 2012. Protests began early Saturday morning with violent confrontations in the streets and protest speeches from opposition parties inside the congress, where Enrique Pena Nieto took the oath of office. Protesters continued vandalizing downtown businesses, smashing plate glass windows and setting office furniture ablaze outside. (AP Photo/Eduardo Verdugo)
Pedestrians walk past a branch of the Starbucks cafe chain in west London, Monday, Dec. 3, 2012. A committee of British lawmakers says the government should "get a grip" and clamp down on multinational corporations that exploit tax laws to move profits generated in Britain to offshore domains.The committee says major multinationals including Starbucks, Google and Amazon are guilty of immoral tax avoidance. Starbucks announced it is reviewing its British tax practices in a bid to restore public trust. (AP Photo/Alastair Grant)
In this photo take Dec. 3, 2010, a Starbucks logo is displayed at a store in Philadelphia. Starbucks Corp. said Wednesday, Jan. 19, 2011, that customers with certain BlackBerry smartphones, iPhones and iPod touch can now use those devices to make purchases at all of its U.S. company-run stores.(AP Photo/Matt Rourke)
In this Feb. 14, 2010 photo, a sign outside a Starbucks hangs over the Riverwalk with the Navarro Street bridge in the background in San Antonio, Texas. Starbucks plans to begin paying a 10-cents-per-share cash dividend to investors.(AP Photo/David Zalubowski)
FILE - This file photo made Nov. 2, 2009, shows a Starbucks coffee shop in Arlington, Mass. Starbucks releases quarterly earnings after the close of the market Wednesday, July 21, 2010. (AP Photo/Elise Amendola, File)
Shown Tuesday, August 11, 2009 is a Starbucks Coffee shop at Adriatrica, a development in McKinney, Texas, designed to look like a Croatian Village.(AP Photo/Donna McWilliam)
A worker cleans the sign outside one of many Starbucks outlets in Beijing Friday April 27, 2007. An Internet campaign was started in January calling for the removal of a Starbucks coffee shop from Beijing's famed Forbidden City. Critics say its presence in the former imperial palace is a smear on China's historical legacy. (AP Photo/Greg Baker)
** FILE ** South Korean tourists queue up to buy coffee at an outlet of Starbucks at the Forbidden City in Beijing, China, in this Thursday, Jan. 18, 2007 file photo. A member of China's legislature has revived calls for the removal of a Starbucks coffee shop from Beijing's Forbidden City, saying its presence was a smear on China's historical legacy, the official Xinhua News Agency reported Sunday March 11, 2007. (AP Photo/Ng Han Guan, File)
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Reaping the benefits (package)

Starbucks offers extensive benefits packages that are customized for each employee, called "Your Special Blend." Options include things like bonuses, 401 (k) matching plans, health/medical/dental plans, and even adoption assistance. The best part about the packages? Both part-time and full-time employees are eligible.

Get educated

Starbucks will pay their employees' college tuitions. Yes, you read that correctly. Through 40 different online programs at Arizona State University, employees who are juniors and seniors in college can earn their Bachelor's degree on the company's dime, while freshmen and sophomores are eligible for their tuition to be partially paid for.

There really isn't a catch, as employees are not required to stay with Starbucks after they earn their degree. Plus, employees that are already in pursuit of a degree at another online institution can apply to transfer their credits to Arizona State and be eligible for Starbucks' program.

RELATED: The evolution of the Starbucks cup throughout the years

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Starbucks cups, different looks through the years
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5 killer perks of working at Starbucks
CHENGDU, SICHUAN PROVINCE, CHINA - 2015/09/13: Coffee cup on table in a Starbucks cafe. Starbucks is streamlining the ordering process so customers are able to get that cup of coffee faster than usual. (Photo by Zhang Peng/LightRocket via Getty Images)
A cappuccino coffee sits in a Starbucks Corp. Reserve cup, used for specialist coffee, on the counter at a Starbucks coffee shop in London, U.K., on Friday, Oct. 16, 2015. Coffee futures fell the most in seven months after Colombia announced measures that will increase exports, spurred by the plight of farmers in the country who are dealing with drought conditions linked to the El Nino weather pattern. Photographer: Chris Ratcliffe/Bloomberg via Getty Images
BEIJING, CHINA - 2014/12/24: A paper coffee cup and Starbucks logo. Starbucks will continue its expansion in China in 2015 and double its China store count to 3,000 by 2019. In its first-quarter fiscal report, the coffee giant shows optimistic expectation for its robust expansion plans in 2015. (Photo by Zhang Peng/LightRocket via Getty Images)
A Starbucks employee writes a message on a cup of freshly brewed coffee at a local store in Washington, DC on December 26, 2012. Starbucks stirred the political pot Wednesday by urging its baristas to write 'come together' on its cups as a way to pressure US lawmakers to compromise on a deal to avert a year-end fiscal crisis. Starbucks chief executive Howard Schultz said the American coffee giant was recommending its first-ever message on the side of tall, grande and venti (small, medium and large) drinks sold at its Washington stores as a way to help break the capital's gridlock on the so-called 'fiscal cliff.' Lawmakers and the White House have less than a week to work out a deal aimed at preventing tax hikes from hitting all Americans and a series of deep, mandated spending cuts from kicking in beginning January 1. AFP PHOTO/Eva HAMBACH (Photo credit should read EVA HAMBACH/AFP/Getty Images)
FILE - In this March 18, 2015 file photo, Larenda Myres holds an iced coffee drink with a "Race Together" sticker on it at a Starbucks store in Seattle. Starbucks baristas will no longer write "Race Together" on customers' cups starting Sunday, ending as planned a visible component of the company's diversity and racial inequality campaign that had sparked widespread criticism in the week since it took effect. (AP Photo/Ted S. Warren, File)
Justin McCartney of Hampton, Va., holds up a cup with the words "Come Together" written on it outside a Starbucks cafe in Washington, Thursday, Dec. 27, 2012. Starbucks is using its coffee cups to jump into the political fray in Washington. The world's biggest coffee chain is asking employees at cafes in the Washington area to scribble the words "Come Together" on cups for drink orders on Thursday and Friday. CEO Howard Schultz says the words are intended as a message to lawmakers about the damage being caused by the divisive negotiations over the "fiscal cliff." (AP Photo/ Evan Vucci)
A Starbucks coffee cup is seen in this photo taken August 12, 2009. AFP Photo/Paul J. Richards (Photo credit should read PAUL J. RICHARDS/AFP/Getty Images)
A customer holds their cup of coffee at the Starbucks in Chagrin Falls, Ohio on Wednesday, Aug. 2, 2006. Starbucks Corp. releases third-quarter earnings after the closing bell. (AP Photo/Amy Sancetta)
A cup of Starbucks tea is seen in Washington, Thursday, Nov. 16, 2006. Starbucks Corp., the largest specialty coffee retailer, will report its earnings for the fiscal fourth quarter on Thursday, Nov. 16, 2006. (AP Photo/Ron Edmonds)
MIAMI - JANUARY 18: In this photo illustration, the new Starbucks 31-ounce Trenta size ice coffee is seen on the right next to a tall cup of Starbucks coffee on January 18, 2011 in Miami, Florida. Starbucks rolled out the newest member of its lineup of drinks which is available only for Tazo shaken iced teas, iced tea lemonades and iced coffees. (Photo illustration by Joe Raedle/Getty Images)
TOKYO, JAPAN - SEPTEMEBR 26: Starbucks Coffe Company's news product 'Starbucks Discoveries'(Espressso (L), Latte (R)) are seen during a preview party on September 26, 2005 in Tokyo, Japan. 'Starbucks Discoveries' is the company's first chilled cup coffee product which will be available at convenience stores on September 27 in Japan with the same coffee beans used at Starbucks stores. (Photo by Junko Kimura/Getty Images)
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