WATCH LIVE: Who's going to win big on Super Tuesday

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Bloomberg Super Tuesday Live Election Coverage

Starting at 5 p.m. ET, AOL.com will air live coverage of the Super Tuesday primaries and caucuses with our partners at Bloomberg Politics. Be sure to come to check in here for all the latest coverage and analysis of the day that will shape the future of the 2016 election cycle.

Read more of the full coverage of what to expect below:

On Tuesday, more delegates will be awarded than on any other day of the presidential race. About half of the delegates needed for a Republican candidate to win the nomination are at stake, plus about a third for Democrats. In roughly a dozen state races, Republican front-runner Donald Trump and Democratic leader Hillary Clinton seem poised to win in landslides that could render them nearly inevitable.

Delegates, though, will be awarded proportionally, so challengers could use the day to position themselves for an extended fight, particularly on the Republican side, where states only begin winner-take-all delegate allocation later in March. Below, six predictions that suggest Clinton and Trump might be coming up on a very good day.

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Super Tuesday 2016 across the country
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WATCH LIVE: Who's going to win big on Super Tuesday
Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton reacts to supporters as she arrives to address supporters at her Super Tuesday election night rally in Miami, Tuesday, March 1, 2016. (AP Photo/Gerald Herbert)
Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump, accompanied by New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie, left, takes questions from members of the media during a news conference on Super Tuesday primary election night in the White and Gold Ballroom at The Mar-A-Lago Club in Palm Beach, Fla., Tuesday, March 1, 2016. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)
Voters arrive at a Democratic caucus late Tuesday, March 1, 2016, in Denver. Colorado is one of 12 states casting votes for party nominees on Super Tuesday, which offers candidates the chance to garner the biggest single-day delegate haul of the nomination contests. (AP Photo/David Zalubowski)
Voters gather for the Democratic presidential caucus at North High School in Denver, Colorado on Tuesday, March 1, 2016. Colorado voters are caucusing to decide between Democratic presidential candidates Hillary Clinton and Bernie Sanders. Colorado is one of a dozen states holding 'Super Tuesday' presidential caucuses or primaries. / AFP / Jason Connolly (Photo credit should read JASON CONNOLLY/AFP/Getty Images)
Democratic presidential candidate Sen. Bernie Sanders, I-Vt., laughs as he arrives with his wife Jane Sanders, and his son Levi Sanders to a primary night rally in Essex Junction, Vt., Tuesday, March 1, 2016, on Super Tuesday. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)
Republican presidential candidate, Sen. Marco Rubio, R-Fla., arrives at a campaign rally, Tuesday, March 1, 2016, in Miami, on Super Tuesday. (AP Photo/Alan Diaz)
Republican presidential candidate Ohio Gov. John Kasich, speaks about his Super Tuesday primary results following a Central Mississippi Republican Party fund raising dinner in Jackson, Miss., Tuesday, March 1, 2016. (AP Photo/Rogelio V. Solis)
Precinct captain Christa DeHerrera, left, puts a band on voter Janell Lindsey after she checked in at a Democratic caucus late Tuesday, March 1, 2016, in Denver. Colorado is one of 12 states casting votes for party nominees on Super Tuesday, which offers candidates the chance to garner the biggest single-day delegate haul of the nomination contests. (AP Photo/David Zalubowski)
ARLINGTON, VA - MARCH 01: Poll workers verify voters' photo indentification cards before they are allowed to cast a ballot inside the Arlington County Fire Station 10 during Super Tuesday voting March 1, 2016 in Arlington, Virginia. Officials are expecting a record turnout of voters in Virginia, one of a dozen states holding presidential primaries or caucuses. (Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)
Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton speaks at her Super Tuesday election night rally in Miami, Tuesday, March 1, 2016. (AP Photo/Gerald Herbert)
Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump speaks on Super Tuesday primary election night at the White and Gold Ballroom at The Mar-A-Lago Club in Palm Beach, Fla., Tuesday, March 1, 2016. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)
Democratic presidential candidate Sen. Bernie Sanders, I-Vt., speaks during a primary night rally in Essex Junction, Vt., Tuesday, March 1, 2016, on Super Tuesday. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)
Supporters of Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton cheer as they watch election returns at her Super Tuesday election night rally in Miami, Tuesday, March 1, 2016. (AP Photo/Gerald Herbert)
TAYLORSVILLE, GA - MARCH 01: A Georgia voter leaves Taylorsville Town Hall after voting on Super Tuesday March 1, 2016, in Taylorsville, Georgia. Voters head to the polls to cast their votes on Georgia's presidential primary. (Photo by Branden Camp/Getty Images)
Voters participate in the Democratic presidential caucus at North High School in Denver, Colorado on Tuesday, March 1, 2016. Colorado voters are caucusing to decide between Democratic presidential candidates Hillary Clinton and Bernie Sanders. Colorado is one of a dozen states holding 'Super Tuesday' presidential caucuses or primaries. / AFP / Jason Connolly (Photo credit should read JASON CONNOLLY/AFP/Getty Images)
MINNEAPOLIS, MN- MARCH 1: Caucus goers cast their vote at a Democratic party caucus site at Jefferson Community School on Super Tuesday, March 1, 2016 in Minneapolis, Minnesota. High turnout has caused long lines and wait times for voters all around Minnesota. (Photo by Stephen Maturen/Getty Images)
MINNEAPOLIS, MN- MARCH 1: Caucus goers wait in line to cast their vote at a Democratic party caucus site at Jefferson Community School on Super Tuesday, March 1, 2016 in Minneapolis, Minnesota. High turnout has caused long lines and wait times for voters all around Minnesota. (Photo by Stephen Maturen/Getty Images)
Six-year-old Layla Dempsey, bottom, talks with her father, Stephen, as he checks in with the judge of his precinct at a Democratic caucus late Tuesday, March 1, 2016, in Denver. Colorado is one of 12 states casting votes for party nominees on Super Tuesday, which offers candidates the chance to garner the biggest single-day delegate haul of the nomination contests. (AP Photo/David Zalubowski)
Voters check in with precinct captains at a Democratic caucus late Tuesday, March 1, 2016, in Denver. Colorado is one of 12 states casting votes for party nominees on Super Tuesday, which offers candidates the chance to garner the biggest single-day delegate haul of the nomination contests. (AP Photo/David Zalubowski)
Hours before polls open, a Bernie Sanders campaign volunteer prepares brochures to be distributed to Sanders supporters reminding them to vote, on Tuesday morning, March 1, 2016 in Austin, Texas. The local Sanders campaign mobilized over 40 volunteers in a grassroots effort to canvas Austin neighborhoods before dawn. (AP Photo/Tamir Kalifa)
WHITE, GA - MARCH 01: 81-year-old Helen Free, left, a polling site assistant manager, takes a lunch break while two Georgia voters fill out voting paper work before casting their ballots on Super Tuesday March 1, 2016, in White, Georgia. Voters head to the polls to cast their votes on Georgia's presidential primary. (Photo by Branden Camp/Getty Images)
ADAIRSVILLE, GA - MARCH 01: 'I'm a Georgia Voter' stickers sit in a basket at a fire station on Super Tuesday March 1, 2016, in Adairsville, Georgia. Voters head to the polls to cast their votes on Georgia's presidential primary. (Photo by Branden Camp/Getty Images)
MIDDLEBURY, VT - MARCH 01: People vote at a polling station on March 1, 2016 in Middlebury, Vermont. Thousands of Americans across the country are participating in Super Tuesday, the biggest day of the 2016 primary season. Thirteen states and one territory are participating in Super Tuesday: Alabama, Alaska, Arkansas, Colorado, Georgia, Massachusetts, Minnesota, Oklahoma, Tennessee, Texas, Vermont, Virginia, Wyoming and American Samoa. This years election, with strong candidates on both the left and the right, is shaping up to be one of the most exciting and divisive in recent history. (Photo by Spencer Platt/Getty Images)
SHOAL CREEK, AL - MARCH 1: Mike Maroney, of Shoal Creek, wears an 'I Voted' sticker during the Super Tuesday election at the Shoal Creek Community Center March 1, 2016 in Shoal Creek, Alabama. The rural center has about 70 voters and most had voted before lunch time. 13 states and American Samoa are holding presidential primary elections, with over 1400 delegates at stake. (Photo by Hal Yeager/Getty Images)
TAYLORSVILLE, GA - MARCH 01: Edna Martinez wears a 'I'm a Georgia Voter' sticker after casting her ballot at Taylorsville Town Hall on Super Tuesday March 1, 2016, in Taylorsville, Georgia. Voters head to the polls to cast their votes on Georgia's presidential primary. (Photo by Branden Camp/Getty Images)
FORT WORTH, TX - MARCH 1: Voters line up to cast their ballots on Super Tuesday March 1, 2016 in Fort Worth, Texas. 13 states and American Samoa are holding presidential primary elections, with over 1400 delegates at stake. (Photo by Ron Jenkins/Getty Images)
Signs are seen on a chair to assist voters at Centreville High School in Centreville, Virginia March 1, 2016, during the Super Tuesday primary voting. Voters in a dozen states will take part in 'Super Tuesday' -- a series of primaries and caucuses in states ranging from Alaska to Virginia, with Virginia the first to open its polling stations at 6:00 am (1100 GMT). / AFP / PAUL J. RICHARDS (Photo credit should read PAUL J. RICHARDS/AFP/Getty Images)
John Echeverria uses the new automatic voting machine at a polling station in Strafford, Vermont, U.S., on Tuesday, March 1, 2016. On Super Tuesday, more delegates will be awarded than on any other day of the presidential race. About half of the delegates needed for a Republican candidate to win the nomination are at stake, plus about a third for Democrats. Photographer: Ian Thomas Jansen-Lonnquist/Bloomberg via Getty Images
ARLINGTON, VA - MARCH 01: Poll workers verify voters' photo indentification cards before they are allowed to cast a ballot inside the Arlington County Fire Station 10 during Super Tuesday voting March 1, 2016 in Arlington, Virginia. Officials are expecting a record turnout of voters in Virginia, one of a dozen states holding presidential primaries or caucuses. (Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)
I Voted stickers rest on a voting machine at a polling station in Strafford, Vermont, U.S., on Tuesday, March 1, 2016. On Super Tuesday, more delegates will be awarded than on any other day of the presidential race. About half of the delegates needed for a Republican candidate to win the nomination are at stake, plus about a third for Democrats. Photographer: Ian Thomas Jansen-Lonnquist/Bloomberg via Getty Images
Voters wait in line to cast their Super Tuesday ballots at a polling station located at the University Co-op in Austin, Texas on Tuesday, March 1, 2016. Voters from Vermont to Colorado, Alaska to American Samoa and a host of states in between were heading to polling places and caucus sites on the busiest day of the 2016 primaries. (AP Photo/Tamir Kalifa)
Tess, a Basset Hound and Collie mix, looks up at voters as her owner Lindsay Greco, right, casts her ballot in the Georgia primary election at a polling site in a firehouse Tuesday, March 1, 2016, in Atlanta. (AP Photo/David Goldman)
MONTAGUE, MA - MARCH 01: Poll workers use a manual, crank operated, ballot box to collect ballots on March 01, 2016 in Montague, MA. Officials are expecting a record turnout of voters in Massachusetts, one of a dozen states holding Super Tuesday presidential primaries or caucuses. (Photo by Matthew Cavanaugh/Getty Images)
A voter walks in to cast her ballot during Alabama's primary at a polling site, Tuesday, March 1, 2016, in Birmingham, Ala. Voters from Vermont to Colorado, Alaska to American Samoa and a host of states in between were heading to polling places and caucus sites on the busiest day of the 2016 primaries. (AP Photo/Brynn Anderson)
A voter casts a ballot in Georgia's primary election under the hole of a slide pole at a polling site in a firehouse Tuesday, March 1, 2016, in Atlanta. (AP Photo/David Goldman)
Democratic presidential candidate Sen. Bernie Sanders, I-Vt., waves as he leaves a news conference after voting in the Vermont primary at the Robert Miller Community and Recreation Center in Burlington, Vermont, Tuesday, March 1, 2016, on Super Tuesday. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)???
Democratic presidential candidate Sen. Bernie Sanders, I-Vt., and his wife Jane Sanders, stand up after voting in the Vermont primary at the Robert Miller Community and Recreation Center in Burlington, Vermont, Tuesday, March 1, 2016, on Super Tuesday. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)???
Democratic presidential candidate Sen. Bernie Sanders, I-Vt., takes a ballot to vote in the Vermont primary at the Robert Miller Community and Recreation Center in Burlington, Vermont, Tuesday, March 1, 2016, on Super Tuesday. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)???
Volunteer election clerk Allie Green Jr. searches for places to post voting signs outside of a Fiesta Mart supermarket, a polling location, before polls open in Austin, Texas on Tuesday, March 1, 2016. Republicans will vote in 11 states, with 595 delegates at stake. Democrats will vote in 11 states and American Samoa, with 865 delegates up for grabs. Some states have contests Tuesday for only one party. (AP Photo/Tamir Kalifa)
Voters stand in line to await voting at the McGee Community Center on March 1, 2016 in Conway, Arkansas. Americans began voting in the crucial Super Tuesday primaries and caucuses in what is deemed the most critical day in the presidential nominating process. The first state to open its polling stations was Virginia at 6:00 am (1100 GMT). / AFP / Michael B. Thomas (Photo credit should read MICHAEL B. THOMAS/AFP/Getty Images)
Tameika Ogburn, a polling site assistant manager, raises her hand during a swearing-in with fellow workers at a polling site before it opens to voters casting ballots in Georgia's primary election Tuesday, March 1, 2016, in Atlanta. (AP Photo/David Goldman)
Voter stickers are seen on a desk at the McGee Community Center on March 1, 2016 in Conway, Arkansas. Americans began voting in the crucial Super Tuesday primaries and caucuses in what is deemed the most critical day in the presidential nominating process. The first state to open its polling stations was Virginia at 6:00 am (1100 GMT). / AFP / Michael B. Thomas (Photo credit should read MICHAEL B. THOMAS/AFP/Getty Images)
A man walks into the Madison Activities Center polling location in Arlington, Virginia, U.S., on Tuesday, March 1, 2016. On Super Tuesday, more delegates will be awarded than on any other day of the presidential race. About half of the delegates needed for a Republican candidate to win the nomination are at stake, plus about a third for Democrats. Photographer: Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images
A voter marks his ballot at the Madison Activities Center polling location in Arlington, Virginia, U.S., on Tuesday, March 1, 2016. On Super Tuesday, more delegates will be awarded than on any other day of the presidential race. About half of the delegates needed for a Republican candidate to win the nomination are at stake, plus about a third for Democrats. Photographer: Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images
A woman wears an "I voted" sticker after voting in Massachusetts' primary election in the East Boston neighborhood of Boston, Tuesday, March 1, 2016. Voters from Vermont to Colorado, Alaska to American Samoa and a host of states in between were heading to polling places and caucus sites on the busiest day of the 2016 primaries.(AP Photo/Michael Dwyer)
A 'Polling Place' sign stands outside the Madison Activities Center polling location in Arlington, Virginia, U.S., on Tuesday, March 1, 2016. On Super Tuesday, more delegates will be awarded than on any other day of the presidential race. About half of the delegates needed for a Republican candidate to win the nomination are at stake, plus about a third for Democrats. Photographer: Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images
A stack of 'I voted' stickers are seen March 1, 2016, at one of the Virginia primary election polling stations at Colin Powell Elementary School, in Centreville, Virginia. Voters in a dozen states will take part in 'Super Tuesday' -- a series of primaries and caucuses in states ranging from Alaska to Virginia, with Virginia the first to open its polling stations at 6:00 am (1100 GMT). / AFP / PAUL J. RICHARDS (Photo credit should read PAUL J. RICHARDS/AFP/Getty Images)
A voter leaves a polling station for Massachusetts' primary election in the East Boston neighborhood of Boston, Tuesday, March 1, 2016. Voters from Vermont to Colorado, Alaska to American Samoa and a host of states in between were heading to polling places and caucus sites on the busiest day of the 2016 primaries. (AP Photo/Michael Dwyer)
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PredictWise: Trump and Clinton

The research project led by David Rothschild, an economist at Microsoft Research in New York City who successfully predicted the winner in 21 of the first 26 primary contests in 2012, aggregates betting market data and polling. As of Sunday, PredictWise had Trump up in 10 of 11 states -- all except Texas, where home-state Senator Ted Cruz is at 85 percent. Otherwise Trump is dominant, with his odds of winning ranging from 67 percent in Minnesota to 96 percent in Tennessee. As for Senator Marco Rubio of Florida, he's second most likely to win in every state except Alaska, Arkansas, Oklahoma, and Texas.

On the Democratic side, Clinton is expected to win 10 of 11 states, according to the PredictWise model, up from eight before her win in the South Carolina primary on Saturday. She has a greater than 95 percent chance of winning delegate-rich Texas, Georgia, and Virginia. The odds lean toward Senator Bernie Sanders in his home state of Vermont and have shifted away from him in Colorado and Massachusetts.

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"If Clinton carries the close states, then that could end the race on Tuesday," Rothschild said in an e-mail. "She is now 95 percent to win the nomination."

RealClearPolitics: Trump and Clinton

On the Republican side as of Sunday, the poll averaging and aggregating site had Trump ahead in five of the six states that have been polled regularly in February. Cruz leads in Texas -- the biggest prize of the day in terms of delegates at stake -- with about 36 percent of the electorate, nearly 9 points above Trump.

Among Democrats as of Sunday, Clinton led in seven of the eight states that have been polled in February, including Texas, Georgia, and Alabama. Sanders led in Vermont by a wide margin -- 75 points -- but his lead in neighboring Massachusetts was less than a single point.

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Bing: Trump and Clinton

After correctly calling seven of eight February contests, Bing Predicts expects blowouts for both Trump and Clinton in tomorrow's primaries and caucuses. Trump is forecast to win every state except Texas, according to the "machine-learned predictive model" that the Microsoft search engine created. It parses data from polls, prediction markets, search engine queries, and social media posts.

Clinton, meanwhile, is expected to win more than 60 percent of the vote in all seven Super Tuesday southern states, and to carry Colorado, Massachusetts, and Minnesota, where Bing Predicts had showed narrow Sanders wins until Clinton took South Carolina resoundingly. As of Sunday, Sanders's only victory was expected to be in his home state of Vermont.

According to the most recent data available from Bing's main competitor, Google, Trump and Sanders accounted for an average of 69 percent and 56 percent of search interest, respectively, in the past 24 hours across the states holding delegate-allocating primaries or caucuses on March 1.

FiveThirtyEight: Trump and Clinton

On Sunday, FiveThirtyEight, which is run by former New York Times stats guru Nate Silver, gave Trump odds of winning five of the six Republican contests it has modeled, including Virginia, Georgia, and Alabama. Rubio is forecasted to come in second in the same races. Cruz has an 85 percent chance of winning Texas, with Trump coming in second.

For the Democrats, Clinton is projected to win seven of eight states modeled, including Arkansas (where she spent more than a decade as first lady) at chances above 95 percent, as well as Georgia, Tennessee, Texas, and Virginia. As usual, Sanders is almost certain to win Vermont.

(For each state, FiveThirtyEight uses two models, one that averages polls and one that attempts to combine the effect of endorsements with the polls. Odds sometimes vary between the projections, but for all states, the candidate who has the highest chances of winning in one model has the highest chances in the other.)

Political Insiders: Rubio and Clinton

Trump's endorsement by New Jersey Governor Chris Christie, himself a candidate until recently, shocked many political observers who had witnessed Christie's criticisms of the mogul. Yet Trump is still weak when measured by the number of endorsements from institutional political figures in Super Tuesday states, even after Alabama Senator Jeff Sessions threw his support to him.

By Bloomberg Politics' latest count, Cruz has pretty much locked up Texas with at least 62 state lawmakers, eight members of Congress, and Governor Greg Abbott. Rubio just barely edges him out in overall numbers, not to mention two governors to Cruz's one -- from Arkansas and Tennessee -- plus the senior senator from Oklahoma, Jim Inhofe. On Sunday, Rubio also received the endorsement of Tennessee Senator Lamar Alexander.

The Democratic endorsement ledgers are far more lopsided. According to a tally updated by FiveThirtyEight, Clinton is supported by 33 U.S. representatives, seven U.S. senators, and four governors from Super Tuesday states. This includes almost the entire Massachusetts congressional delegation and the governor and senior U.S. senator from Vermont. Sanders, meanwhile, has just two Super Tuesday endorsements.

Ballotcraft: Trump and Clinton

This fantasy politics game co-founded by two Stanford grads has thousands of players who, using fake money, buy "shares" in candidates. As of Sunday, Trump was expected to win 10 of 11 states, with Cruz's home state of Texas the unsurprising outlier. Cruz is otherwise most competitive in Arkansas and Oklahoma, where the site's users give him at least a 1-in-4 chance of winning. For Rubio, he's second most-likely to win (with at least 25 percent odds) in Georgia, Massachusetts, Minnesota, and Virginia.

"What we hear from our users is that Donald Trump's polling leads are just too large in many of these states," said Ballotcraft CEO Dennis Jiang. "He demonstrated in Nevada and South Carolina that he is able to turn out his supporters, so there's no longer confidence that the superior organizations of Cruz or Rubio will be able to overcome such polling deficits."

On the Democratic side, Clinton is likely to win the Southern states, where she's expected to perform strongly with African-American voters like she did in South Carolina. Sanders is projected to do better in states such as Colorado, Massachusetts, Minnesota, and Vermont that are home to a lot of white liberals.

State-by-State Tally

Here's a detailed look at who each prediction source says will win each Super Tuesday state on the Republican side.

And a look at what each prediction source says to expect on the Democratic side.

Read Super Tuesday Predictions Point to Trump, Clinton Rout on bloombergpolitics.com

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