7 things you should do after getting fired from your job

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What to Do If You Get Fired

Losing your job is one of the most difficult things a professional could face in their career — especially when it's completely unexpected.

And, as entrepreneur James Altucher points out in a LinkedIn post, the days following aren't much easier.

"You can't meditate. You can't exercise. You can't eat healthy. You can't shave. Or bathe. You can't even take deep breaths," he says. "None of that stuff helps, you think. None of that immediately deposits money in the bank. None of that brings back your self-esteem."

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7 things you should do after getting fired from your job

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Percent planning to decrease staff levels: 7

Net: 23%

Percent planning to increase staff levels: 25

Percent planning to decrease staff levels: 4

Net: 21% 

Percent planning to increase staff levels: 24

Percent planning to decrease staff levels: 3

Net: 21% 

Percent planning to increase staff levels: 26

Percent planning to decrease staff levels: 5

Net: 21%

Percent planning to increase staff levels: 26

Percent planning to decrease staff levels: 5

Net: 21%

Percent planning to increase staff levels: 24

Percent planning to decrease staff levels: 3

Net: 21%

Percent planning to increase staff levels: 25

Percent planning to decrease staff levels: 4

Net: 21%

Percent planning to increase staff levels: 25

Percent planning to decrease staff levels: 4

Net: 21%

Percent planning to increase staff levels: 26

Percent planning to decrease staff levels: 5

Net: 21%

Percent planning to increase staff levels: 26

Percent planning to decrease staff levels: 4

Net: 22%

Percent planning to increase staff levels: 25

Percent planning to decrease staff levels: 3

Net: 22%

Percent planning to increase staff levels: 27

Percent planning to decrease staff levels: 4

Net: 23% 

Percent planning to increase staff levels: 26

Percent planning to decrease staff levels: 3

Net: 23%

Percent planning to increase staff levels: 32

Percent planning to decrease staff levels: 8

Net: 24%

Percent planning to increase staff levels: 25

Percent planning to decrease staff levels: 0

Net: 25%

Percent planning to increase staff levels: 28

Percent planning to decrease staff levels: 2

Net: 26%

Percent planning to increase staff levels: 33

Percent planning to decrease staff levels: 6

Net: 27%

Percent planning to increase staff levels: 31

Percent planning to decrease staff levels: 4

Net: 27%

Percent planning to increase staff levels: 35

Percent planning to decrease staff levels: 1

Net: 34%

Percent planning to increase staff levels: 30

Percent planning to decrease staff levels: 6

Net: 24%

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Altucher, who has been fired "so many times I can't list them all," says his one piece of advice that does help is to do just one thing every day.

Here are some things you could do in the days after losing your job to get out of your funk:

Process your emotions.

Tyler Parris, author of "Chief Of Staff: The Strategic Partner Who Will Revolutionize Your Organization,"says it's important to process the emotions you're feeling once you're calm.

He suggests starting by acknowledging what those emotions are. Then "figure out what you're going to do with those emotions and how you will respond most productively to them. Emotions left unchecked will build up and, eventually, you will start acting them out in ways that don't serve you," he says.

Enjoy your new freedom.

Get eight hours of sleep; wake up early; exercise; take a shower; put on a suit; go into the city; and walk around, Altucher suggests. You need to keep things as "normal" as possible during this tough time by staying busy and active. You don't want to sit home and sulk.

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Let go of your resentment.

"You are going to feel resentful about people at your old job. They wronged you," Altucher says. But remember that they're also just trying to survive.

Make lists of all the good qualities your old boss and coworkers have, and send each of them an email telling them why you think they are good at what they do, he suggests. Also, thank them for the opportunity to work with them and for anything they may have taught you.

Have lunch with someone you haven't seen in three years.

Altucher says meeting up with someone you haven't seen in a while injects new blood into your system. "You need a total transfusion to get rid of the infected old blood." Plus, it's a great way to network and let people know you're on the hunt for a new job.

Jot down a list of your major achievements.

"It's natural to lose confidence after being laid off, and to feel like this setback will have long lasting repercussions. But while you were employed, you contributed a great deal," Lynn Taylor, a national workplace expert and the author of "Tame Your Terrible Office Tyrant: How to Manage Childish Boss Behavior and Thrive in Your Job," tells Business Insider.

She suggests making a quick list of your biggest accomplishments to remind yourself that you have a valuable skill set that makes you marketable.

Treat yourself like a one-man business.

Find your "customers" (places or people you might want to work with), and then come up with a list of 10 or more ideas for each customer that can make them money. "This way you keep your idea muscle intact," Altucher says. "Pitch your ideas to that customer if you can. If you can't, move on to the next customer."

Make a list of all expenses you can slash.

You were just fired. This may be a financially difficult time for you. Spend one day figuring out your new budget, Altucher suggests. You don't know how long it will be until you have a steady income again, so you'll need to be cautious with your spending.

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7 things you should do after getting fired from your job

13. Postal service clerks

Average hours typically worked a week: 39.32

Median earned income: $51,000

What they do: Perform any combination of tasks in a post office like receive letters and parcels; sell postage and revenue stamps, postal cards, and stamped envelopes; fill out and sell money orders; place mail in pigeon holes of mail racks or in bags; and examine mail for correct postage.

(Kevork Djansezian via Getty Images)

12. Speech-language pathologists

Average hours typically worked a week: 36.17

Median earned income: $54,000

What they do: Assess and treat persons with speech, language, voice, and fluency disorders.

(Jayme Poisson via Getty Images)

11. Registered nurses​

Average hours typically worked a week: 37.59

Median earned income: $56,000

What they do: Assess patient health problems and needs, develop and implement nursing-care plans, and maintain medical records

(Reza Estakhrian via Getty Images)

10. Psychologists

Average hours typically worked a week: 36.75 

Median earned income: $56,000

What they do: Diagnose or evaluate mental and emotional disorders of individuals through observations, interviews, and psychological tests and formulate and administer programs of treatment.

(Universal Images Group via Getty Images)

9. Chiropractors

Average hours typically worked a week: 39.75

Median earned income: $60,000

What they do: Assess, treat, and care for patients by manipulation of spine and musculoskeletal system.

(Yellow Dog Productions via Getty Images)

8. Occupational therapists

Average hours typically worked a week: 36.02 

Median earned income: $60,000

What they do: Provide rehabilitative treatments and procedures that help build or restore vocational, homemaking, and daily living skills.

(Dan Porges via Getty Images)

7. Technical writers​

Average hours typically worked a week: 39.61

Median earned income: $62,000

What they do: Write technical materials, such as equipment manuals, appendices, or operating and maintenance instructions.

(Thomas Barwick via Getty Images)

6. Physical therapists

Average hours typically worked a week: 37.43 

Median earned income: $63,000

What they do: Assess, plan, organize, and participate in rehabilitative programs that improve mobility, relieve pain, increase strength, and improve or correct disabling conditions resulting from disease or injury.

(Bloomberg via Getty Images)

5. Audiologists

Average hours typically worked a week: 37.77

Median earned income: $64,000

What they do: Assess and treat persons with hearing and related disorders.

(Boston Globe via Getty Images)

4. Radiation therapists

Average hours typically worked a week: 38.40

Median earned income: $70,000

What they do: Provide radiation therapy to patients as prescribed by a radiologist according to established practices and standards.

(Thomas Tolstrup via Getty Images)

3. Optometrists

Average hours typically worked a week: 39.03

Median earned income: $100,000

What they do: Diagnose, manage, and treat conditions and diseases of the human eye and visual system.

(Vince Talotta via Getty Images)

2. Pharmacists

Average hours typically worked a week: 38.38

Median earned income: $102,000

What they do: Dispense drugs prescribed by physicians and other health practitioners and provide information to patients about medications and their use.

(JONATHAN NACKSTRAND via Getty Images)

1. Dentists

Average hours typically worked a week: 37.83

Median earned income: $130,000

What they do:Examine, diagnose, and treat diseases, injuries, and malformations of teeth and gums.

(Don Bartletti via Getty Images)

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