US proposes sharp ramping up of North Korea sanctions at UN

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U.S. Allies Step Up Pressure on North Korea

UNITED NATIONS, Feb 25 (Reuters) - The United States presented a draft U.N. Security Council resolution on Thursday that would dramatically tighten existing restrictions on North Korea after its Jan. 6 nuclear test and create the toughest U.N. sanctions regime in over two decades.

The draft, seen by Reuters, would require U.N. member states to conduct mandatory inspections of all cargo passing through their territory to or from North Korea to look for illicit goods. Previously states were only required to do this if they had reasonable grounds to believe there was illicit cargo.

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It would close a gap in the U.N. arms embargo on Pyongyang by banning all weapons imports and exports.

There would also be an unprecedented ban on the transfer to North Korea of any item that could directly contribute to the operational capabilities of the North Korean armed forces, such as trucks that could be modified for military purposes.

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US proposes sharp ramping up of North Korea sanctions at UN
North Koreans watch an electronic screen announcing the launch of a satellite on Sunday, Feb. 7, 2016, at the Pyongyang Railway Station in Pyongyang, North Korea. North Korea on Sunday defied international warnings and launched a long-range rocket that the United Nations and others call a cover for a banned test of technology for a missile that could strike the U.S. mainland. (AP Photo/Kim Kwang Hyon)
North Koreans gather at the Kim Il Sung Square to celebrate a satellite launch Monday, Feb. 8, 2016, in Pyongyang, North Korea. People in Pyongyang danced and watched fireworks the day after a rocket launch that has been strongly condemned by many countries around the world. (AP Photo/Jon Chol Jin)
North Koreans watch a fireworks display from the Kim Il Sung Square as they gather to celebrate a satellite launch, Monday, Feb. 8, 2016, in Pyongyang, North Korea. People in Pyongyang danced and watched fireworks the day after a rocket launch that has been strongly condemned by many countries around the world. (AP Photo/Jon Chol Jin)
North Koreans dance on the Kim Il Sung Square to celebrate a satellite launch Monday, Feb. 8, 2016, in Pyongyang, North Korea. People in Pyongyang danced and watched fireworks the day after a rocket launch that has been strongly condemned by many countries around the world. (AP Photo/Jon Chol Jin)
North Koreans gather at the Kim Il Sung Square to celebrate a satellite launch, Monday, Feb. 8, 2016, in Pyongyang, North Korea. People in Pyongyang danced and watched fireworks the day after a rocket launch that has been strongly condemned by many countries around the world. (AP Photo/Jon Chol Jin)
North Koreans dance on the Kim Il Sung Square to celebrate a satellite launch Monday, Feb. 8, 2016, in Pyongyang, North Korea. People in Pyongyang danced and watched fireworks the day after a rocket launch that has been strongly condemned by many countries around the world. (AP Photo/Jon Chol Jin)
South Korean residents in Japan protest with a banner that reads: "we sternly denouce the missile launch" in front of headquarters of the pro-Pyongyang General Association of Korean Residents in Japan, in Tokyo Monday, Feb. 8, 2016. The U.N. Security Council condemned North Korea's launch of a long-range rocket that world leaders called a banned test of ballistic missile technology and another "intolerable provocation." The U.N.'s most powerful body pledged to quickly adopt a new resolution with "significant" new sanctions. (AP Photo/Shizuo Kambayashi)
Visitors watching the North side are seen through barbed-wire entanglements as they visit Imjingak near the border village of the Panmunjom in Paju, South Korea, Monday, Feb. 8, 2016. The U.N. Security Council condemned North Korea's launch of a long-range rocket that world leaders called a banned test of ballistic missile technology and another "intolerable provocation." The U.N.'s most powerful body pledged to quickly adopt a new resolution with "significant" new sanctions. (AP Photo/Ahn Young-joon)
South Koreans watch a TV news program with a file footage about North Korea's rocket launch at Seoul Railway Station in Seoul, South Korea, Sunday, Feb. 7, 2016. North Korea on Sunday defied international warnings and launched a long-range rocket that the United Nations and others call a cover for a banned test of technology for a missile that could strike the U.S. mainland. The letters on the screen read: "The U.N. Security Council will hold a meeting on Feb. 7." (AP Photo/Ahn Young-joon)
South Korean Army soldiers patrol along the barbed-wire fence in Paju, near the border with North Korea, South Korea, Monday, Feb. 8, 2016. The U.N. Security Council condemned North Korea's launch of a long-range rocket that world leaders called a banned test of ballistic missile technology and another "intolerable provocation." The U.N.'s most powerful body pledged to quickly adopt a new resolution with "significant" new sanctions. (AP Photo/Ahn Young-joon)
A Japanese police officer stands in front of the headquarters of the pro-Pyongyang General Association of Korean Residents in Japan, in Tokyo, Monday, Feb. 8, 2016. The U.N. Security Council condemned North Korea's launch of a long-range rocket that world leaders called a banned test of ballistic missile technology and another "intolerable provocation." The U.N.'s most powerful body pledged to quickly adopt a new resolution with "significant" new sanctions. (AP Photo/Shizuo Kambayashi)
South Korean army soldiers close a gate in Paju, near the border with North Korea, South Korea, Monday, Feb. 8, 2016. The U.N. Security Council condemned North Korea's launch of a long-range rocket that world leaders called a banned test of ballistic missile technology and another "intolerable provocation." The U.N.'s most powerful body pledged to quickly adopt a new resolution with "significant" new sanctions. (AP Photo/Ahn Young-joon)
In this Sunday, Feb. 7, 2016 photo, a passer-by receives an extra newspaper reporting North Korea's rocket launch, in Tokyo. North Korea on Sunday defied international warnings and launched a long-range rocket that the United Nations and others call a cover for a banned test of technology for a missile that could strike the U.S. mainland. (AP Photo/Eugene Hoshiko, File)
South Korean army soldiers watch a TV news program with a file footage about North Korea's rocket launch at Seoul Railway Station in Seoul, South Korea, Sunday, Feb. 7, 2016. North Korea on Sunday defied international warnings and launched a long-range rocket that the United Nations and others call a cover for a banned test of technology for a missile that could strike the U.S. mainland. (AP Photo/Ahn Young-joon)
Visitors watch the North Korean side at the unification observation post near the border village of Panmunjom, which has separated the two Koreas since the Korean War, in Paju, South Korea, Sunday, Feb. 7, 2016. For North Korea's propaganda machine, the long-range rocket launch Sunday carved a glorious trail of "fascinating vapor" through the clear blue sky. For South Korea's president, and other world leaders, it was a banned test of dangerous ballistic missile technology and yet another "intolerable provocation." (AP Photo/Ahn Young-joon)
Samantha Power, left, the U.S. Ambassador to the United Nations, listens as Motohide Yoshikawa, Japan's ambassador, makes comments to the media following a Security Council meeting at U.N. headquarters, Sunday, Feb. 7, 2016. The council is meeting about North Korea's successful launch of a long-range missile. (AP Photo/Mark Lennihan)
A postman enters the headquarters of the pro-Pyongyang General Association of Korean Residents in Japan as a police officer stands guard its gate in Tokyo, Monday, Feb. 8, 2016. The U.N. Security Council condemned North Korea's launch of a long-range rocket that world leaders called a banned test of ballistic missile technology and another "intolerable provocation." The U.N.'s most powerful body pledged to quickly adopt a new resolution with "significant" new sanctions. (AP Photo/Koji Sasahara)
People watch a TV news reporting a rocket launch in North Korea, at Seoul Railway Station in Seoul, Sunday, Feb. 7, 2016. For North Korea's propaganda machine, the long-range rocket launch Sunday carved a glorious trail of "fascinating vapor" through the clear blue sky. For South Korea's president, and other world leaders, it was a banned test of dangerous ballistic missile technology and yet another "intolerable provocation." (AP Photo/Ahn Young-joon)
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Other proposed measures include a ban on all supplies of aviation and rocket fuel to North Korea, a requirement for states to expel North Korean diplomats engaging in illicit activities, and blacklisting 17 North Korean individuals and 12 entities, including the National Aerospace Development Agency or 'NADA', the body responsible for February's rocket launch.

U.S. Ambassador to the United Nations Samantha Power told reporters the new measures, if approved, would be "the strongest set of sanctions imposed by the Security Council in more than two decades."

Several council diplomats told Reuters they hoped to put the resolution to a vote as early as Saturday. The draft was the result of seven weeks of tough negotiations between the United States and China, North Korea's neighbor and main ally.

"This is a very robust resolution," a U.S. official said on condition of anonymity. "Clearly this took a long time ... it was a difficult process."

North Korea has been under U.N. sanctions since 2006 because of its multiple nuclear tests and rocket launches.

China and the United States had differed on how strongly to respond to Pyongyang's most recent test, with Washington urging harsh punitive measures and Beijing emphasizing dialog and milder U.N. steps confined to non-proliferation.

Diplomats said a sharp tightening of restrictions was necessary since Pyongyang has proved its determination to flout at all costs attempts at constraining its nuclear and missile programs.

They said they hoped the latest measures would make it harder for North Korea to continue with that policy, keeping up the pressure on the country's leadership without making the country's impoverished population any poorer.

"Pyongyang has prioritized the pursuit of these massively expensive programs over absolutely everything else," the U.S. official said. "So is New York action going to automatically convince the regime's leaders to cease? I think we're realistic on that point."

However, he added that "this resolution will be felt, it will have an impact ... The DPRK (North Korea) have never been subject to the kind of pressure that is in the resolution."

Power said the measures were aimed at the country's leadership and was "careful not to punish the North Korean people."

In Beijing, Chinese Foreign Ministry spokeswoman Hua Chunying on Thursday told a regular press briefing "We hope and believe this new resolution can help effectively constrain North Korea from further developing its nuclear missile program."

There will also be further restrictions aimed at making it more difficult for North Korea to press ahead with its nuclear and missile programs. Pyongyang is currently banned from importing and exporting nuclear and missile technology and is not allowed to import luxury goods. The list of banned items will be expanded.

The U.S. official said one of five annexes to the resolution lists 31 ships owned by North Korean shipping firm Ocean Maritime Management Company Limited, which will be blacklisted.

Also new, countries will be required, not just encouraged, to freeze the assets of North Korean entities linked to Pyongyang's nuclear or missile programs and to prohibit the opening of new branches or offices of North Korean banks or to engage in banking correspondence with North Korean banks.

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