The source of the mysterious 'ocean buzzing' may have finally been discovered

Before you go, we thought you'd like these...
Source Of Perplexing Ocean 'Buzzing' Might Have Been Found
If you aren't terrified by the ocean, you're not thinking deep enough.

No, actually, look how deep it is:


Image: Iambored.com

And that depth is just an estimate. The ocean is actually SO deep we aren't even sure how deep it is.

It's no wonder, then, that there's some stuff going on down there we can't exactly explain. One of them being the mysterious "ocean buzz" -- a low and constant humming noise that can be heard deep in the Pacific Ocean that remained unexplainable.

Until now.

Take a deeper look into the Mariana Trench:
11 PHOTOS
Mariana Trench, deep ocean scariness
See Gallery
The source of the mysterious 'ocean buzzing' may have finally been discovered
AT SEA, UNSPECIFIED - JUNE 27: (BEST QUALITY AVAILABLE) (CHINA OUT) A submersible 'Jiaolong' works at a depth of 7,062 metres on June 27, 2012 in the western Pacific Ocean. The submersible 'Jiaolong', carrying two people, reportedly reached the depth during its fifth dive into the Mariana Trench, the deepest part of the world's oceans which is located in the western Pacific Ocean, (Photo by ChinaFotoPress/ChinaFotoPress via Getty Images)
AT SEA, UNSPECIFIED - JUNE 27: (BEST QUALITY AVAILABLE) (CHINA OUT) A submersible 'Jiaolong' works at a depth of 7,062 metres on June 27, 2012 in the western Pacific Ocean. The submersible 'Jiaolong', carrying two people, reportedly reached the depth during its fifth dive into the Mariana Trench, the deepest part of the world's oceans which is located in the western Pacific Ocean, (Photo by ChinaFotoPress/ChinaFotoPress via Getty Images)
AT SEA, UNSPECIFIED - JUNE 27: (BEST QUALITY AVAILABLE) (CHINA OUT) A submersible 'Jiaolong' works at a depth of 7,062 metres on June 27, 2012 in the western Pacific Ocean. The submersible 'Jiaolong', carrying two people, reportedly reached the depth during its fifth dive into the Mariana Trench, the deepest part of the world's oceans which is located in the western Pacific Ocean, (Photo by ChinaFotoPress/ChinaFotoPress via Getty Images)
AT SEA, UNSPECIFIED - JUNE 27: (BEST QUALITY AVAILABLE) (CHINA OUT) A submersible 'Jiaolong' works at a depth of 7,062 metres on June 27, 2012 in the western Pacific Ocean. The submersible 'Jiaolong', carrying two people, reportedly reached the depth during its fifth dive into the Mariana Trench, the deepest part of the world's oceans which is located in the western Pacific Ocean, (Photo by ChinaFotoPress/ChinaFotoPress via Getty Images)
Locates Mariana Trench
AT SEA, UNSPECIFIED - JUNE 19: (CHINA OUT) Submersible 'Jiaolong' is put into the sea for the second dive during a series of six scheduled ones to attempt the country's deepest-ever 7,000-meter manned dive on June 19, 2012 in At Sea, Unspecified. The submersible 'Jiaolong', carrying three people, reportedly reached a depth of 6,965 meters in the Mariana Trench, the deepest part of the world's oceans which is located in the western Pacific Ocean, on June 19, local time. (Photo by ChinaFotoPress/ChinaFotoPress via Getty Images)
AT SEA, UNSPECIFIED - JUNE 19: (CHINA OUT) Submersible 'Jiaolong' is put into the sea for the second dive during a series of six scheduled ones to attempt the country's deepest-ever 7,000-meter manned dive on June 19, 2012 in At Sea, Unspecified. The submersible 'Jiaolong', carrying three people, reportedly reached a depth of 6,965 meters in the Mariana Trench, the deepest part of the world's oceans which is located in the western Pacific Ocean, on June 19, local time. (Photo by ChinaFotoPress/ChinaFotoPress via Getty Images)
AT SEA, UNSPECIFIED - JUNE 27: (BEST QUALITY AVAILABLE) (CHINA OUT) A submersible 'Jiaolong' works at a depth of 7,062 metres on June 27, 2012 in the western Pacific Ocean. The submersible 'Jiaolong', carrying two people, reportedly reached the depth during its fifth dive into the Mariana Trench, the deepest part of the world's oceans which is located in the western Pacific Ocean, (Photo by ChinaFotoPress/ChinaFotoPress via Getty Images)
QINGDAO, CHINA - JULY 16: (CHINA OUT) Submersible Jiaolong returns from the ocean on Monday, July 16, 2012 om Qingdao, Shandong Province of China. The submersible reached a record depth of 7,062 meters in June in the Mariana Trench in the western Pacific Ocean. Jiaolong returned in glory from a six-week mission to its home port and received new orders for another research dive. (Photo by ChinaFotoPress/ChinaFotoPress via Getty Images)
AT SEA, UNSPECIFIED - JUNE 27: (BEST QUALITY AVAILABLE) (CHINA OUT) Workers take down samples captured from the Mariana Trench on June 27, 2012 in the western Pacific Ocean. The submersible 'Jiaolong', carrying two people, reportedly reached a depth of 7,062 metres during its fifth dive into the Mariana Trench, the deepest part of the world's oceans which is located in the western Pacific Ocean, (Photo by ChinaFotoPress/ChinaFotoPress via Getty Images)
AT SEA, UNSPECIFIED - JUNE 19: (CHINA OUT) Submersible 'Jiaolong' is taken out of the water after completing the second dive during a series of six scheduled ones to attempt the country's deepest-ever 7,000-meter manned dive on June 19, 2012 in At Sea, Unspecified. The submersible 'Jiaolong', carrying three people, reportedly reached a depth of 6,965 meters in the Mariana Trench, the deepest part of the world's oceans which is located in the western Pacific Ocean, on June 19, local time. (Photo by ChinaFotoPress/ChinaFotoPress via Getty Images)
of
SEE ALL
BACK TO SLIDE
SHOW CAPTION +
HIDE CAPTION


New research from the University of California, San Diego, suggests that the buzz could be a "dinner bell" for smaller organisms like bony fish to signal that it's dark enough to safely ascend closer to the surface to feed; alternatively, it tells them when to descend back down.

Larger marine animals like dolphins and whales are known to communicate with each other this way, but this argument suggests that smaller animals which reside deep in the water do as well.

Using acoustic measurement instruments to record the ocean's sounds during the daily periods of up and down travel, the team found a three to six decibel increase in noise compared to the norm.

As one of the scientists, Dr. Simone Baumann-Pickering, describes, "It's not that loud, it sounds like a buzzing or humming, and that goes on for an hour to two hours, depending on the day."

While this explanation has a lot of evidence to back it up, Baumann-Pickering also admits to a less glamorous albeit equally plausible explanation for ocean buzz: It could be the sounds of fish emitting gas to change their vertical positioning in the water.

Yep. A mystery scientists have puzzled over for several years could have, in fact, been fish farts all along.

More about the ocean:
Looking to the ocean floor for new antibiotics
Report: Ocean's plastic waste will outweigh fish by 2050
7 mindblowing facts you never knew about our oceans
Read Full Story

People are Reading