Internet rallying behind 97-year-old renter who may get evicted

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Internet Rallying Behind 97-Year-Old Renter Who May Get Evicted

Rental prices in California's Bay Area have been climbing at astounding rates over the past years.

Recently, Marie Hatch, a 97-year-old woman, who had been reportedly assured by her landladies for decades that she's safe from the crushing hikes, was told otherwise.

The new owner of the Burlingame house issued an eviction notice.

KPIX reports that when she moved into the home 66 years ago, friend and owner Vivian Kruse told her she could live there as long as she'd like.

After passing down through the generations, the home is now in the hands of David Kantz, the husband of Vivian's deceased granddaughter.

It is his position that as there is no physical record, he need not honor the agreement.

A GoFundMe campaign has raised over $26,000 to help her financially if she is evicted.

RELATED: Learn more about how San Francisco's building boom is affecting residents:

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San Francisco growth affecting local African Americans
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Internet rallying behind 97-year-old renter who may get evicted
In this Nov. 10, 2015, photo, former resident Roana Kent, center right, walks in the Alice Griffith housing development with current resident Falaofuta Satele in San Francisco's Bayview-Hunters Point district. Kent works in the development assisting residents. As San Francisco rides a massive building boom, fueled largely by growth in tech-based jobs, many African-Americans worry they will not be able to afford to stay in a neighborhood theyâve long called home. (AP Photo/Marcio Jose Sanchez)
In this Nov. 9, 2015, photo, Pastor Yul Dorn poses for a portrait inside his home, where he's facing eviction due to foreclosure in San Francisco's Bayview-Hunters Point district. As San Francisco rides a massive building boom, fueled largely by growth in tech-based jobs, many African-Americans worry they will not be able to afford to stay in a neighborhood theyâve long called home. (AP Photo/Marcio Jose Sanchez)
In this Nov. 10, 2015, photo, Roanae Kent, stands outside of housing units at the Alice Griffith housing development, where she used to live in San Francisco's Bayview-Hunters Point district. Kent, who now lives an Vallejo, now works in the development assisting residents. (AP Photo/Marcio Jose Sanchez)
In this Nov. 10, 2015, photo, Ira Watkins, a homeless artist, works on a painting inside of the van where he works and lives in the Bayview-Hunters Point district in San Francisco. As San Francisco rides a massive building boom reminiscent of post-World War II, fueled largely by growth in tech-based jobs, developers are finally wading into a part of the city long plagued by too much poverty and not enough fresh produce markets. (AP Photo/Marcio Jose Sanchez)
In this Nov. 10, 2015, photo, Stacy Bryant, standing, serves lunch to Sylvia Vaughn, center sitting, at a senior center in San Francisco's Bayview-Hunters Point district. Bayview-Hunters Point is one of the last major frontiers for San Francisco development, encompassing more than a square mile of undeveloped land in a cramped city of 49 square miles. (AP Photo/Marcio Jose Sanchez)
In this Nov. 9, 2015, photo, Shaun Britton does a trick on his bike as he crosses the street in the Bayview-Hunters Point district in San Francisco. Bayview-Hunters Point has developable land, a rarity in space-starved San Francisco, where housing is scarce and among the most expensive in the country. (AP Photo/Marcio Jose Sanchez)
In this Nov. 9, 2015, photo, Terrance Everett enjoys a post-work drink at Sam Jordan's bar in San Francisco's Bayview-Hunters Point district. Everett, grew up in Bayview-Hunters Point but since moved to Concord, Calif., seeking better rent prices. (AP Photo/Marcio Jose Sanchez)
In this Nov. 9, 2015, photo, community activist Lawrence Baisley, at right, talks about life in the Bayview-Hunters Point district in San Francisco. Bayview-Hunters Point has developable land, a rarity in space-starved San Francisco, where housing is scarce and among the most expensive in the country. (AP Photo/Marcio Jose Sanchez)
In this Nov. 9, 2015, photo, Thomas Bailey offers up barbecue to passers by while vending on a street corner in the Bayview-Hunters Point district in San Francisco. As San Francisco rides a massive building boom, fueled largely by growth in tech-based jobs, many African-Americans worry they will not be able to afford to stay in a neighborhood theyâve long called home. (AP Photo/Marcio Jose Sanchez)
In this Nov. 9, 2015, photo, Alice Price poses for a portrait on a street corner in the Bayview-Hunters Point district in San Francisco. As San Francisco rides a massive building boom, fueled largely by growth in tech-based jobs, many African-Americans worry they will not be able to afford to stay in a neighborhood theyâve long called home. (AP Photo/Marcio Jose Sanchez)
In this Nov. 9, 2015, photo, David Antunovich, a resident of the Bayview- Hunters Point district walks outside of his home in San Francisco. As San Francisco rides a massive building boom reminiscent of post-World War II, fueled largely by growth in tech-based jobs, developers are finally wading into a part of the city long plagued by too much poverty and not enough fresh produce markets. (AP Photo/Marcio Jose Sanchez)
In this Nov. 9, 2015, photo, a worker makes measurements at the new San Francisco Shipyard homes development in the Bayview Hunters Point district in San Francisco. As San Francisco rides a massive building boom, fueled largely by growth in tech-based jobs, many African-Americans worry they will not be able to afford to stay in a neighborhood theyâve long called home. (AP Photo/Marcio Jose Sanchez)
In this Nov. 9, 2015, photo, new housing unites are built in the new San Francisco Shipyard development in the Bayview Hunters Point district in San Francisco. As San Francisco rides a massive building boom, fueled largely by growth in tech-based jobs, many African-Americans worry they will not be able to afford to stay in a neighborhood theyâve long called home. (AP Photo/Marcio Jose Sanchez)
In this Nov. 9, 2015, photo, with the area's historic shipyard in the background, David Satterfield, spokesman for lead developer Lennar Urban, walks the grounds of the new San Francisco Shipyard homes development in the Bayview Hunters Point district in San Francisco. (AP Photo/Marcio Jose Sanchez)
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