Former California state senator gets 5 years for taking bribes

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Former California State Senator Gets 5 Years for Taking Bribes


A disgraced California state senator learned Wednesday he'll spend the next five years in prison.

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In July 2015, former state Sen. Leland Yee, along with three others, pleaded guilty to racketeering in federal court. Yee admitted to accepting money in exchange for political favors.

During the sentencing, the U.S. district judge told Yee: "I don't feel I can be lenient. The crimes you have committed were essentially an attack on a democratic institution."

Yee was arrested and indicted in March 2014 along with 25 others, including Raymond "Shrimp Boy" Chow, the leader of a notorious San Francisco-area gang. In January, Chow was convicted of 162 counts, including murder, money laundering and rackteering.

The Los Angeles Times reports part of Yee's plea deal includes forfeiting about $33,000. His prison sentence also comes with a $20,000 fine.

Photos of Yee:
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Former California Senator Leland Yee
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Former California state senator gets 5 years for taking bribes
SAN FRANCISCO, CA - NOVEMBER 07: California State senator and candidate for San Francisco mayor Leland Yee (R) and his wife Maxine Yee (L) wait in line to cast their ballots at a polling station inside San Francisco City Hall on November 7, 2011 in San Francisco, California. With one day to go until election day, candidates for mayor of San Francisco are stumping throughout the city. (Photo by Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)
California Sen. Leland Yee, D-San Francisco, right, leaves the San Francisco Federal Building, Wednesday, March 26, 2014, in San Francisco. The FBI has filed a 137-page affidavit outlining a detailed corruption case against Yee, who is accused of asking for campaign donations in exchange for introducing an undercover agent to an arms trafficker. (AP Photo/Ben Margot)
California state Sen. Leland Yee leaves federal court in San Francisco on Thursday, July 31, 2014. Yee pleaded not guilty to charges including racketeering, bribery, and gun trafficking in an organized crime and public corruption case centered in San Francisco's Chinatown. (AP Photo/Noah Berger)
SAN FRANCISCO, CA - OCTOBER 03: Leland Yee speaks at the San Francisco Mayoral Candiates Forum at The Fillmore on October 3, 2011 in San Francisco, California. (Photo by Steve Jennings/WireImage)
SAN FRANCISCO, CA - NOVEMBER 07: California State senator and candidate for San Francisco mayor Leland Yee campaigns on a MUNI bus on November 7, 2011 in San Francisco, California. With one day to go until election day, candidates for mayor of San Francisco are stumping throughout the city. (Photo by Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)
SAN FRANCISCO, CA - NOVEMBER 08: California State senator and San Francisco mayoral candidate Leland Yee greets commuters as he campaigns in a MUNI station on November 8, 2011 in San Francisco, California. Candidates for San Francisco mayor are making one last push to encourage people to vote as San Franciscans head to the polls to vote for a new mayor, district attorney and sheriff. (Photo by Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)
SAN FRANCISCO, CA - MARCH 31: California State Sen. Leland Yee (C) leaves the Phillip Burton Federal Building after a court appearance on March 31, 2014 in San Francisco, California. Yee appeared in federal court today for a second time after being arrested along with 25 others by F.B.I. agents last week on political corruption and firearms trafficking charges. Yee is free on a $500,000 unsecured bond. (Photo by Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)
State Sen. Leland Yee (D-San Francisco) has been charged with public corruption as part of a major FBI operation spanning the Bay Area, law-enforcement sources said, casting yet another cloud of corruption over the Democratic establishment in the Legislature and torpedoing Yee's aspirations for statewide office.ÃHere, Yee speaks to members of the press in Sacramento, Calif., in this Feb. 14, 2013, file photo. (Randall Benton/Sacramento Bee/MCT via Getty Images)
SAN FRANCISCO, CA - MARCH 31: California State senator Leland Yee leaves the Phillip Burton Federal Building after a court appearance on March 31, 2014 in San Francisco, California. State Senator Leland Yee appeared in federal court today for a second time after being arrested along with 25 others by F.B.I. agents last week on political corruption and firearms trafficking charges. Yee is free on a $500,000 unsecured bond. (Photo by Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)
File - In this April 13, 2010 file photo State Sen. Leland Yee, D-San Francisco, right, discusses the the documents related to a speaking contract for former Vice Presidential candidate Sarah Palin, found in the trash bins at California State University, Stanislaus, during a news conference in Sacramento, Calif. Looking on are CSU, Stanislaus students Alicia Lewis, left and Ashli Briggs, right. Yee is the latest candidate to show interest in becoming mayor of San Francisco. Yee, who represents the city's southern neighborhoods in the California senate formally formed on Wednesday an exploratory committee to raise campaign contributions. (AP Photo/Rich Pedroncelli, File)
FILE - In this file photo taken April 25, 2011, State Sen. Leland Yee, D-San Francisco, is seen at the Capitol in Sacramento, Calif. Yee, the 65-year-old San Francisco Democrat was arrested Wednesday March 26, 2014, during a series of raids by the FBI in Sacramento and the San Francisco Bay Area. He was later arraigned on charges that alleged illegal dealing in firearms, wire fraud and trading the influence of his office for money. (AP Photo/Rich Pedroncelli, File)
State Sen. Leland Yee, D-San Francisco, center, and Victor Lee, left, brother of missing fisherman Donald Lee, listen during a news conference in San Francisco, Wednesday, July 6, 2011. Yee is asking Mexican officials to extend search for missing fishermen after their boat capsized in Mexico. (AP Photo/Paul Sakuma)
Calif. State Sen. Leland Yee, D-San Francisco, speaks at a news conference in San Francisco, Monday, June 27, 2011. The Supreme Court ruled Monday that it is unconstitutional to bar children from buying or renting violent video games, saying government doesn't have the authority to "restrict the ideas to which children may be exposed" despite complaints that the popular and fast-changing technology allows the young to simulate acts of brutality. Yee, who wrote the video game ban, told The Associated Press Monday that he was reading the dissents in hope of finding a way to reintroduce the law in a way it would be constitutional. At left is Shannon Udovic, with the American Academy of Pediatrics. (AP Photo/Paul Sakuma)
FILE -- In this May 25, 2012 file photo is State Sen. Leland Yee, D-San Francisco, who announced Monday, Dec. 17, 2012, that he will introduce a bill to close what he calls a loophole in the state's ban on assault weapons and is considering changes to state gun laws on everything from background checks to storage regulations. Yee is one of several California lawmakers calling for new laws they say are aimed at increasing safety either through gun control or improved security at public schools in the wake of Friday's mass shooting at the Sandy Hook Elementary School in Newtown, Conn. (AP Photo/Rich Pedroncelli)
State Sen. Leland Yee, D-San Francisco, urged lawmakers to reject a measure to ban the sale, trade or possession of shark fins at the Senate in Sacramento, Calif., Tuesday, Sept. 6, 2011. Yee and Sen. Ted Lieu, D-Torrence, called the bill by Assemblyman Paul Fong, D-Cupertino, a racist measure because the fins are used in a soup considered a delicacy in some Asian cultures. Despite the opposition the bill was approved on a 25-9 vote and sent to the governor. (AP Photo/Rich Pedroncelli)
FILE -- In this Jan. 28, 2014 file photo, state Sen. Leland Yee, D-San Francisco, left, speaks on a bill, while his seat mate Sen. Ron Calderon, D-Montebello, works at his desk at the Capitol in Sacramento, Calif. In the wake the recent indictments of Yee and Calderon on federal corruption charges lawmakers are proposing to strengthen political ethics and reform campaign finance laws.(AP Photo/Rich Pedroncelli, file)
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