Facebook's head of recruiting explains what it's like to interview there

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Facebook is not only the best place to work in America — it's one of the most desirable employers in the world.

It has 13,000 employees across 64 offices around the globe, and it continues to scale its size and ambition.

Key to this growth is finding exceptionally talented employees who are also committed to Facebook's mission "to give people the power to share and make the world more open and connected."

Miranda Kalinowski, Facebook's global head of recruiting, explained to Business Insider what the tech powerhouse looks for and how the interview process works.

"We need to make sure that we're hiring people who are deeply invested in us, first and foremost," she said. "And we hire builders. So regardless of whether we're hiring an engineer or a finance analyst, they're going to be the people who like to build things."

Before applicants are hired, they'll typically go through four or five interviews that gauge their talent and cultural fit.

The first round is a phone interview with a recruiter, who assesses the candidate's professional experience and passion for the company.

If that goes well, the candidate will then have a "technical" phone interview with someone who already has the job the candidate is applying for. For example, an engineer will be interviewed by a fellow engineer rather than by a recruiter who knows nothing about programming.

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Any of these non-recruiter employees selected to do interviews must first undergo intensive training to ensure they know what to look for.

The third interview takes place on site and includes an office tour, which features a demo of the Oculus virtual reality headset to take some of the pressure off the candidate and help them open up.

"It's very much a two-way street," Kalinowski said. "They can find out more about us, and we can find out more about them."

The remaining interviews are subject to the role and department. For example, an engineer may go through a coding interview, where an employee sees how quickly and accurately a candidate can write code on a whiteboard in response to a given situation.

All candidates are subject to hypothetical questions to test how they would respond on the job, as well as logic questions to test how they think — all of which ultimately test whether the person is right for Facebook.

Kalinowski's favorite interview question, which is also popular among other interviewers there, is: "On your very best day at work — the day you come home and think you have the best job in the world — what did you do?" The interviewer is taught to look for an answer that indicates candidates will be personally driven to stretch themselves at Facebook, since a high level of talent is a prerequisite in the highly competitive tech industry.

The candidates who get hired are the ones who demonstrate that they're just as excited as Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg is, Kalinowski said. "Anyone who listens to Mark will hear him say that we've still got 5 billion people to connect, so no one should be resting on their laurels. That sense of urgency and energy around it is infectious. "

Related: See Facebook through the years:

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Facebook's head of recruiting explains what it's like to interview there
An unidentifed University of Missouri student looks through Facebook while in class Wednesday, Feb. 22, 2006, on the Columbia, Mo. campus. Facebook, a popular online social network for students, has drawn the attention of several schools administrators and prospective employers to see what students are up to. (AP Photo/L.G. Patterson)
**ADVANCE FOR WEEKEND FEB. 24-25** Facebook.com's mastermind, Mark Zuckerberg smiles at his office in Palo Alto, Calif., Monday, Feb. 5, 2007. He is sitting on a potential gold mine that could make him the next Silicon Valley whiz kid to strike it rich. But the 22-year-old founder of the Internet's second largest social-networking site also could turn into the next poster boy for missed opportunities if he waits too long to cash in on Facebook Inc., which is expected to generate revenue of more than $100 million this year. The bright outlook is one reason Zuckerberg felt justified spurning several takeover bids last year, including a $1 billion offer from Yahoo Inc. (AP Photo/Paul Sakuma)
This photo photo provided by the Medill News Service shows a Facebook web page seen in Washington, Thursday, Feb. 14, 2008. (AP Photo/Medill, News Service, Lillian Cunningham)
FILE - This July 23, 2008 file photo shows Mark Zuckerberg, founder and CEO of Facebook, delivering the keynote address during the annual Facebook f8 developer conference in San Francisco. (AP Photo/Eric Risberg, File)
Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg delivers a keynote address at a conference in San Francisco, Wednesday, April 21, 2010. (AP Photo/Marcio Jose Sanchez)
A businessman displays the Facebook Inc. web page using an Apple iPad, made by Apple Inc. in this arranged photograph in London, U.K., on Thursday, Aug.19, 2010. Research In Motion Ltd. is turning to technology used in BMW audio systems and the Army�s Crusher tank as it tries to distinguish its new tablet computer from Apple Inc.�s iPad, said three people familiar with the plans. Photographer: Jason Alden/Bloomberg via Getty Images
FILE- This undated product image released by Facebook on Aug. 25, 2010, shows Facebook Places. (AP Photo/Facebook) NO SALES. BEST QUALITY AVAILABLE.** zu APD9318 **
Mark Zuckerbergs facebook page. (Erkan Mehmet / Alamy)
Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg talks about the redesign during the f/8 conference in San Francisco, Thursday, Sept. 22, 2011. Facebook is dramatically redesigning its users' profile pages to create what Zuckerberg says is a "new way to express who you are." (AP Photo/Paul Sakuma)
This June 20, 2012 photo shows a Facebook login page on a computer screen in Oakland, N.J. Facebook is expected to report their quarterly financial results after the market closes on Thursday, July 26, 2012. (AP Photo/Stace Maude)
FILE - In this May 9, 2013 file photo, Joshua Knoller, an account manager with Nicholas & Lence Communications, looks at the Facebook page of his mother, Rochelle Knoller of Fair Lawn, N.J., on his office computer, in New York. Knoller spent years refusing his motherâs âFriend Requestâ on Facebook before eventually âcaving in.â Today they have an agreement: sheâll try not to make embarrassing comments, and he can delete them if she does. (AP Photo/Richard Drew, File)
Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg gestures while delivering the keynote address at the f8 Facebook Developer Conference Wednesday, April 30, 2014, in San Francisco. (AP Photo/Ben Margot)
23 March 2015 - Istanbul, TURKEY: Facebook user login screen. The number of active mobile users Facebook has reached 1 billion people. (Photo via Shutterstock)
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