Poll shows more young Americans would rather have dinner with Bernie Sanders than Kanye West and Justin Bieber combined

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Polls Show Young Women Flocking to Sanders in New Hampshire

More young Americans would rather have dinner with Democratic presidential candidate Bernie Sanders than music megastars Kanye West and Justin Bieber — combined.

Recent polling from conservative pollster Frank Luntz of 1,000 Americans between the age of 18 to 26 found that 22% of respondents placed Sanders, a Vermont senator, in their top three choices from a list of more than 20 options. Just 8% picked West and only 7% chose Bieber for their top three.

Sanders was chosen by a higher percentage of respondents than Beyoncé, Mark Zuckerberg, and LeBron James, among others. He finished ahead of GOP frontrunner Donald Trump and former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton, the leader on the Democratic side.

President Barack Obama finished first overall, with 29% of young people polled placing him on their top three.

See Bernie Sanders with his young supporters:

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NTP: Bernie Sanders attracts millennials
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Poll shows more young Americans would rather have dinner with Bernie Sanders than Kanye West and Justin Bieber combined
IOWA CITY, IOWA-JANUARY 30: Students are ecstatic with Bernie Sanders as he arrives to a big rally at the University of Iowa. (Photo by Lucian Perkins /for The Washington Post via Getty Images)
IOWA CITY, IOWA-JANUARY 30: Bernie Sanders, a Democratic candidate for President of the U.S., attracts a huge crowd a rally at the University of Iowa. (Photo by Lucian Perkins /for The Washington Post via Getty Images)
Senator Bernie Sanders, an independent from Vermont and 2016 Democratic presidential candidate, center, and his wife Jane Sanders, center right, stand on stage as the song 'This Land is Your Land' is played during a campaign rally at the University of Iowa Field House in Iowa City, Iowa, U.S., on Saturday, Jan. 30, 2016. Hillary Clinton is holding onto a slim lead over Sanders in Iowa as Democrats prepare for Mondays caucuses, though an outpouring of young voters and those who say the system is rigged could enable Sanders to pull off an upset, according to a new poll. Photographer: Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images
DES MOINES, IA - JANUARY 29: Mark Foster of the band Foster the People performs at a concert in support of Democratic presidential candidate Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-VT) on January 29, 2016 in Des Moines, Iowa. The Democratic and Republican Iowa Caucuses, the first step in nominating a presidential candidate from each party, will take place on February 1. (Photo by Brendan Hoffman/Getty Images)
Attendees hold up campaign signs as Senator Bernie Sanders, an independent from Vermont and 2016 Democratic presidential candidate, speaks during a campaign rally at the University of Iowa Field House in Iowa City, Iowa, U.S., on Saturday, Jan. 30, 2016. Hillary Clinton is holding onto a slim lead over Sanders in Iowa as Democrats prepare for Mondays caucuses, though an outpouring of young voters and those who say the system is rigged could enable Sanders to pull off an upset, according to a new poll. Photographer: Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images
Senator Bernie Sanders, an independent from Vermont and 2016 Democratic presidential candidate, speaks during a campaign rally at the University of Iowa Field House in Iowa City, Iowa, U.S., on Saturday, Jan. 30, 2016. Hillary Clinton is holding onto a slim lead over Sanders in Iowa as Democrats prepare for Mondays caucuses, though an outpouring of young voters and those who say the system is rigged could enable Sanders to pull off an upset, according to a new poll. Photographer: Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images
An attendee holds an illuminated campaign sign for Senator Bernie Sanders, an independent from Vermont and 2016 Democratic presidential candidate, during a campaign rally at the University of Iowa Field House in Iowa City, Iowa, U.S., on Saturday, Jan. 30, 2016. Hillary Clinton is holding onto a slim lead over Sanders in Iowa as Democrats prepare for Mondays caucuses, though an outpouring of young voters and those who say the system is rigged could enable Sanders to pull off an upset, according to a new poll. Photographer: Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images
IOWA CITY, IOWA-JANUARY 30: Bernie Sanders, a Democratic candidate for President of the U.S., attracts a huge crowd a rally at the University of Iowa. (Photo by Lucian Perkins /for The Washington Post via Getty Images)
DES MOINES, IA - JANUARY 29: Andy Fleming and Dave Moore perform at a concert in support of Democratic presidential candidate Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-VT) on January 29, 2016 in Des Moines, Iowa. The Democratic and Republican Iowa Caucuses, the first step in nominating a presidential candidate from each party, will take place on February 1. (Photo by Brendan Hoffman/Getty Images)
DES MOINES, IA - JANUARY 29: Audience members attend a concert in support of Democratic presidential candidate Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-VT) on January 29, 2016 in Des Moines, Iowa. The Democratic and Republican Iowa Caucuses, the first step in nominating a presidential candidate from each party, will take place on February 1. (Photo by Brendan Hoffman/Getty Images)
DES MOINES, IA - JANUARY 29: Singers Jill Sobule, Kay Hanley, and Michelle Lewis (L-R) concert in support of Democratic presidential candidate Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-VT) on January 29, 2016 in Des Moines, Iowa. The Democratic and Republican Iowa Caucuses, the first step in nominating a presidential candidate from each party, will take place on February 1. (Photo by Brendan Hoffman/Getty Images)
Senator Bernie Sanders, an independent from Vermont and 2016 Democratic presidential candidate, waves as he arrives to speak during a campaign rally at the University of Iowa Field House in Iowa City, Iowa, U.S., on Saturday, Jan. 30, 2016. Hillary Clinton is holding onto a slim lead over Sanders in Iowa as Democrats prepare for Mondays caucuses, though an outpouring of young voters and those who say the system is rigged could enable Sanders to pull off an upset, according to a new poll. Photographer: Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images
IOWA CITY, IOWA-JANUARY 30: Bernie Sanders, a Democratic candidate for President of the U.S., attracts a huge crowd a rally at the University of Iowa. (Photo by Lucian Perkins /for The Washington Post via Getty Images)
Democratic presidential candidate Sen. Bernie Sanders, I-Vt., left, and Vampire Weekend lead singer Ezra Koenig wave during a campaign rally at the University of Iowa, Saturday, Jan. 30, 2016, in Iowa City, Iowa. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)
Democratic presidential candidate Bernie Sanders (C) stands with rock band Vampire Weekend's lead singer Ezra Koenig (R) after speaking at the University of Iowa in Iowa City, Iowa, January 30, 2016, ahead of the Iowa Caucus. / AFP / Jim WATSON (Photo credit should read JIM WATSON/AFP/Getty Images)
Lead singer of Vampire Weekend Ezra Koenig performs during a campaign rally for Democratic presidential candidate Sen. Bernie Sanders, I-Vt., at the University of Iowa, on Saturday, Jan. 30, 2016, in Iowa City, Iowa. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)
Attendees cheer as Senator Bernie Sanders, an independent from Vermont and 2016 Democratic presidential candidate, not pictured, leaves the stage during a campaign rally at the University of Iowa Field House in Iowa City, Iowa, U.S., on Saturday, Jan. 30, 2016. Hillary Clinton is holding onto a slim lead over Sanders in Iowa as Democrats prepare for Mondays caucuses, though an outpouring of young voters and those who say the system is rigged could enable Sanders to pull off an upset, according to a new poll. Photographer: Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images
Attendees dance to a David Bowie song after a Senator Bernie Sanders, an independent from Vermont and 2016 Democratic presidential candidate, campaign rally at the University of Iowa Field House in Iowa City, Iowa, U.S., on Saturday, Jan. 30, 2016. Hillary Clinton is holding onto a slim lead over Sanders in Iowa as Democrats prepare for Mondays caucuses, though an outpouring of young voters and those who say the system is rigged could enable Sanders to pull off an upset, according to a new poll. Photographer: Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images
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But Sanders demolished Obama in another category — when asked which political figure they "respect the most," young voters picked Sanders over Obama, 31% to 18%. Sanders also topped both Clinton and Trump in this category by at least 20 points.

Those polled believe income inequality, education, national security and terrorism, race relations, and government accountability are the top five issues facing the country, in that order.

The high level of support for Sanders among young people is no surprise. In Saturday's Nevada caucuses, Sanders won an overwhelming majority of the young vote over Clinton, as he had previously in both Iowa and New Hampshire.

You can read Luntz's full results here.

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