Everyone really wants Carson and Kasich to drop out

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GOP Primary Heads to Nevada


It's really happening. Donald Trump is winning state after state, and heading into Tuesday's Nevada caucus, he shows no signs of stopping. The real estate mogul holds 67 delegates, a 56-delegate lead over second-place Ted Cruz, making it increasingly hard to imagine how anyone but Trump will win the nomination—except, just maybe, if all the non-competitive candidates scram, so the "real" GOP can rally behind a single opponent.

Anti-Trump Republicans and a few party bigwigs are calling on John Kasich and Ben Carson to dutifully drop out so the GOP can throw its collective weight behind one of the two freshman senators vying for second, Marco Rubio or Ted Cruz.

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Everyone really wants Carson and Kasich to drop out
LAS VEGAS, NV - FEBRUARY 20: Attendees watch caucus returns during a caucus day event for democratic presidential candidate former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton at Caesers Palace on February 20, 2016 in Las Vegas, Nevada. Hillary Clinton defeated Democratic rival U.S.Sen Bernie Sanders (I-VT) in the Nevada Democratic caucuses. (Photo by Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)
LAS VEGAS, NV - FEBRUARY 20: Democratic presidential candidate former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton embraces her husband former U.S. president Bill Clinton during a caucus day event at Caesers Palace on February 20, 2016 in Las Vegas, Nevada. Hillary Clinton defeated Democratic rival U.S.Sen Bernie Sanders (I-VT) in the Nevada Democratic caucuses. (Photo by Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)
HENDERSON, NV - FEBRUARY 20: Democratic presidential candidate Sen. Bernie Sanders (D-VT) gives a concession speech at the Henderson Pavilion on February 20, 2016 in Henderson, Nevada. Sanders lost to Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton in the Nevada caucus. (Photo by Ethan Miller/Getty Images)
Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton speaks to students at Del Sol High School, Friday, Feb. 19, 2016, in Las Vegas. (AP Photo/John Locher)
Democratic presidential candidate Sen. Bernie Sanders, I-Vt., center, waves to hotel workers at MGM Grand hotel and casino Saturday, Feb. 20, 2016, in Las Vegas. (AP Photo/Jae C. Hong)
People line up to participate in the Democratic caucus at the University of Nevada Saturday, Feb. 20, 2016, in Reno, Nev. (AP Photo/Marcio Jose Sanchez)
Precinct captain Hayley Hageman instructs people through a bullhorn at a Democratic caucus site at the University of Nevada Saturday, Feb. 20, 2016, in Reno, Nev. (AP Photo/Marcio Jose Sanchez)
Democratic presidential candidate Sen. Bernie Sanders, I-Vt., center, pauses for photos with hotel workers at MGM Grand hotel and casino Saturday, Feb. 20, 2016, in Las Vegas. (AP Photo/Jae C. Hong)
Democratic presidential candidate Sen. Bernie Sanders, I-Vt., left, is hugged by a hotel worker at Caesars Palace Friday, Feb. 19, 2016, in Las Vegas. (AP Photo/Jae C. Hong)
Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton visits with Harrah's Las Vegas employees on the day of the Nevada Democratic caucus, Saturday, Feb. 20, 2016, in Las Vegas. (AP Photo/John Locher)
A supporter listens to Democratic presidential candidate Sen. Bernie Sanders, I-Vt., at a rally Friday, Feb. 19, 2016, in Reno, Nev. (AP Photo/Jae C. Hong)
Actress Susan Sarandon walks onto the stage to introduce Democratic presidential candidate Sen. Bernie Sanders, I-Vt., at a rally Friday, Feb. 19, 2016, in Reno, Nev. (AP Photo/Jae C. Hong)
Democratic presidential candidate Sen. Bernie Sanders, I-Vt., and wife, Jane, wave as they arrive at a rally Friday, Feb. 19, 2016, in Henderson, Nev. (AP Photo/Jae C. Hong)
Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton speaks during a rally Friday, Feb. 19, 2016, in Las Vegas. (AP Photo/John Locher)
A woman listens to Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton speak during a rally Friday, Feb. 19, 2016, in Las Vegas. (AP Photo/John Locher)
Democratic presidential candidate Sen. Bernie Sanders, I-Vt., center, acknowledges the cheering crowd after a rally Friday, Feb. 19, 2016, in Henderson, Nev. (AP Photo/Jae C. Hong)
A man holds up signs while listening to Democratic presidential candidate Sen. Bernie Sanders, I-Vt., at a rally, Friday, Feb. 19, 2016, in Henderson, Nev. (AP Photo/Jae C. Hong)
Democratic presidential candidate Sen. Bernie Sanders, I-Vt., center, sings with musicians and actors after a rally Friday, Feb. 19, 2016, in Henderson, Nev. (AP Photo/Jae C. Hong)
Sara Watts, center, and other supporters cheer for Democratic presidential candidate Sen. Bernie Sanders, I-Vt., while waiting for the arrival of Sen. Sanders at a rally Friday, Feb. 19, 2016, in Henderson, Nev. (AP Photo/Jae C. Hong)
Students listen to Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton at Del Sol High School, Friday, Feb. 19, 2016, in Las Vegas. (AP Photo/John Locher)
Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton meets with students at Del Sol High School, Friday, Feb. 19, 2016, in Las Vegas. (AP Photo/John Locher)
Democratic presidential candidate, Sen. Bernie Sanders, I-Vt., speaks during a rally Friday, Feb. 19, 2016, in Reno, Nev. (AP Photo/Marcio Jose Sanchez)
LAS VEGAS, NV - FEBRUARY 20: Democratic presidential candidate Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-VT) and his wife, Jane O'Meara Sanders, (R) greet voters as they visit the Western High School caucus site on February 20, 2016 in Las Vegas, Nevada. Sanders and Hillary Clinton wait for the voters to weigh in as they head to the polls in the Democratic caucus. (Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images)
LAS VEGAS, NV - FEBRUARY 20: Voters chant as they wait in line to get into a Democratic caucus at Caesars Palace on February 20, 2016 in Las Vegas, Nevada. Nevada voters are caucusing to decide between Democratic presidential candidates Hillary Clinton and Sen. Bernie Sanders. (Photo by Ethan Miller/Getty Images)
A Senator Bernie Sanders, an independent from Vermont and 2016 Democratic presidential candidate, precinct captain arranges campaign buttons on a table ahead of the Nevada Democratic presidential caucus at Desert Oasis High School in Las Vegas, Nevada, U.S., on Saturday, Feb. 20, 2016. Today voters weigh in on the Democratic battle between Hillary Clinton and Bernie Sanders competing in the Nevada caucuses with Clinton believed to have the advantage in the western state because of its heavily Hispanic electorate, but some recent polls show the race tied. Photographer: Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images
Caucusgoers line up to check-in before casting their vote for a Democratic presidential candidate ahead of the Nevada caucus at Desert Oasis High School in Las Vegas, Nevada, U.S., on Saturday, Feb. 20, 2016. Today voters weigh in on the Democratic battle between Hillary Clinton and Bernie Sanders competing in the Nevada caucuses with Clinton believed to have the advantage in the western state because of its heavily Hispanic electorate, but some recent polls show the race tied. Photographer: Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images
LAS VEGAS, NV - FEBRUARY 20: Voters chant as they wait in line to get into a Democratic caucus at Caesars Palace on February 20, 2016 in Las Vegas, Nevada. Nevada voters are caucusing to decide between Democratic presidential candidates Hillary Clinton and Sen. Bernie Sanders (D-VT). (Photo by Ethan Miller/Getty Images)
Eligible caucus voters arrive at Del Sol Academy of the Performing Arts in Las Vegas to participate in First in the West presidential caucus on February 20, 2016. / AFP / John GURZINSKI (Photo credit should read JOHN GURZINSKI/AFP/Getty Images)
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On Tuesday, a Vocativ analysis of tweets containing either Carson's or Kasich's name and the phrase "drop out" found that 1,092 users had tweeted about Carson dropping out, while 1,404 mentioned Kasich in the same vein.That's nearly four percent of the entire volume of tweets mentioning Carson and more than seven percent of the tweets mentioning Kasich.

And, each time Trump wins, the calls intensify.

The biggest spike came onFebruary 2, the day after the Iowa caucus: 63 people tweeted about the retired neurosurgeon dropping out of the race the day before; 10,527 people mentioned Carson dropping out on the second (that was also the day news broke that the Cruz campaign misinformed the Iowa electorate that Carson was leaving the race, which added to the chatter). Meanwhile, only 475 people tweeted about Kasich dropping out the day after Iowa, but that figure represents a huge jump from the 53 that had tweeted those words on the first. In this contest, Cruz finished first, though Trump earned a close second. Carson, however, finished fourth, while Kasich placed eighth.

On February 10, the day following the New Hampshire primary, 2,328 Twitter users mentioned the words "Carson," "drop," and "out," up from 803 during the actual contest. For Ohio Governor Kasich, 780 tweeted about the candidate leaving the race, up from 122 the day before. Carson would finish eighth in New Hampshire; Kasich nabbed second place behind Trump.

After last Saturday's South Carolina primary, 7,190 people tweeted about Carson leaving the field on Sunday, February 21 (Carson finished dead last in the state). Kasich, who finished second behind Trump, garnered 6,479 mentions about dropping out. Those figures were up from 560 on the day of the contest for Carson and 266 for Kasich.

Neither Kasich nor Carson appear to be listening: Kasich is vowing to stay in the race until the primary in Ohio, where he's a popular governor—even though recent polling there shows Trump beating him slightly on his home turf.

And Carson, well, who knows. After losing badly in South Carolina this past Saturday, he told his supporters that his campaign was just getting started. On the same day he said President Obama cannot identify with the black experience in America because he was "raised white," on "Fox & Friends" Carson compared the race to the story of the Tortoise and the Hare (in which he is the turtle, perhaps an unfortunate comparison for the sleepiest candidate).

That means we'll likely have a five candidate race for at least a few more weeks—and that Republicans will keep up their Twitter assault in a last-ditch effort to save the party from itself.

The post Everyone Really Wants Carson And Kasich To Drop Out appeared first on Vocativ.

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