Trump wins decisively in South Carolina, Clinton clinches Nevada

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Donald Trump Wins South Carolina Primary

Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump rolled to victory on Saturday in South Carolina in a contest that saw former Florida Governor Jeb Bush drop out, while Democratic hopeful Hillary Clinton beat back a strong challenge from Bernie Sanders in Nevada.

The victories by Trump, who is running as an anti-establishment outsider, and Clinton, a preeminent political insider, solidified their positions as the front-runners to win their parties' respective nominations ahead of the Nov. 8 presidential election.

SEE ALSO: Ben Carson vows to soldier on despite South Carolina loss

The night's most prominent casualty, Bush suffered a distant fourth place finish in the Republican contest and announced he had suspended his campaign, ending his dream of becoming a third Bush president after his father and brother.

"The people of Iowa, New Hampshire and South Carolina have spoken, and I really respect their decision," an emotional Bush said in Columbia. He finished far out of the running in each of the first three states.

GOP candidates campaigning in South Carolina:

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GOP Candidates campaigning in South Carolina
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Trump wins decisively in South Carolina, Clinton clinches Nevada
Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump waves after speaking at a rally at the Riverview Park Activity Center in North Augusta, S.C., Tuesday, Feb. 16, 2016. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)
Republican presidential candidate, former Florida Gov. Jeb Bush talks with supporters at a polling place outside Eastlan Baptist Church, Saturday, Feb. 20, 2016 in Greenville, S.C. (AP Photo/Paul Sancya)
Republican presidential candidate Sen. Marco Rubio, R-Fla., signs his book at Clemson University during a campaign stop, Friday, Feb. 19, 2016 in Clemson, S.C. (AP Photo/Paul Sancya)
Ben Carson, retired neurosurgeon and 2016 Republican presidential candidate, smiles while speaking to a reporter during a campaign stop on primary election day at The Beacon Drive-In in Spartanburg, South Carolina, U.S., on Saturday, Feb. 20, 2016. With South Carolina polls closing at 7 p.m., voters will have their say in the Republican presidential contest as Donald Trump, who holds a commanding lead in most South Carolina polls, and five other Republican candidates face off. Photographer: Luke Sharrett/Bloomberg via Getty Images
CHAPIN, SC - FEBRUARY 20: People vote in the Republican presidential primary on February 20, 2016 in Chapin, South Carolina. Polls show New York businessman Donald Trump leading his closest rival U.S. Sen. Ted Cruz (R-TX). (Photo by Spencer Platt/Getty Images)
NORTH CHARLESTON, SC - FEBRUARY 19: People reach for signatures, photos, and handshakes as republican presidential candidate Donald Trump greets the crowd after speaking during a campaign event at the North Charleston Convention Center in North Charleston, SC on Friday Feb. 19, 2016. (Photo by Jabin Botsford/The Washington Post via Getty Images)
NORTH CHARLESTON, SC - FEBRUARY 19, 2016: Senator Rubio delivers a heart felt and energetic speech to the gathered supporters at RB Stall High School Friday, February 19, 2016 in North Charleston, South Carolina . (Alex Holt for The Washington Post via Getty Images)
CHARLESTON, SOUTH CAROLINA-FEBRUARY 19: Ted Cruz comes out again to speak to supporters after sitting down with Fox Show host Sean Hannity. (Photo by Lucian Perkins /for The Washington Post via Getty Images)
Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump speaks during a campaign stop Friday, Feb. 19, 2016, in North Charleston, S.C. (AP Photo/Matt Rourke)
Supporters for Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump hold signs during a South Carolina Republican primary night event Saturday, Feb. 20, 2016, in Spartanburg, S.C. (AP Photo/Paul Sancya)
Republican presidential candidate, Sen. Marco Rubio, R-Fla. speaks during a campaign stop, Tuesday, Feb. 16, 2016, in Summerville, S.C. (AP Photo/Matt Rourke)
Republican presidential candidate Sen. Ted Cruz, R-Texas, speaks at a rally Tuesday, Feb. 16, 2016, in Anderson, S.C. (AP Photo/Paul Sancya)
Attendees wait to enter a Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump a campaign event Wednesday, Feb. 17, 2016, in Bluffton, S.C. (AP Photo/Matt Rourke)
Republican presidential candidate, former Florida Gov. Jeb Bush, center, stands with members of the audience for the pledge of allegiance before speaking at a rally at Summerville Country Club in Summerville, S.C., Wednesday, Feb. 17, 2016. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)
Republican presidential candidate, former Florida Gov. Jeb Bush speaks at a rally at Summerville Country Club in Summerville, S.C., Wednesday, Feb. 17, 2016. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)
Republican presidential candidate, Sen. Ted Cruz, R-Texas speaks at the Seneca Family Restaurant, Tuesday, Feb. 16, 2016, in Seneca, S.C. (AP Photo/Paul Sancya)
Shadows of Republican presidential candidate Sen. Ted Cruz, R-Texas, are cast on a sign as he speaks at a rally Tuesday, Feb. 16, 2016, in Anderson, S.C. (AP Photo/Paul Sancya)
Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump meets with attendees during a campaign stop Wednesday, Feb. 17, 2016, in Walterboro, S.C. (AP Photo/Matt Rourke)
Republican presidential candidate, former Florida Gov. Jeb Bush listens to a question from the audience during a rally at Summerville Country Club in Summerville, S.C., Wednesday, Feb. 17, 2016. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)
Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump speaks during a campaign stop Wednesday, Feb. 17, 2016, in Walterboro, S.C. (AP Photo/Matt Rourke)
Republican presidential candidate Ben Carson addresses the audience during a presidential forum at First Baptist North Spartanburg in Spartanburg, S.C., Wednesday, Feb. 17, 2016. (AP Photo/Alex Sanz)
Republican presidential candidate Sen. Ted Cruz, R-Texas, addresses the audience during a presidential forum at First Baptist North Spartanburg in Spartanburg, S.C., Wednesday, Feb. 17, 2016. (AP Photo/Alex Sanz)
Senator Ted Cruz, a Republican from Texas and 2016 presidential candidate, speaks during a campaign rally in Columbia, South Carolina, U.S., on Tuesday, Feb. 16, 2016. Cruz has flooded South Carolina airwaves with attack ads against Donald Trump, seeking to portray him as an opportunistic politician who shouldn't be trusted by conservatives. Photographer: Daniel Acker/Bloomberg via Getty Images
Campaign buttons for Senator Ted Cruz, a Republican from Texas and 2016 presidential candidate, sit in a basket ahead of a campaign rally at the Columbia Armory in Columbia, South Carolina, U.S., on Tuesday, Feb. 16, 2016. Cruz has flooded South Carolina airwaves with attack ads against Donald Trump, seeking to portray him as an opportunistic politician who shouldn't be trusted by conservatives. Photographer: Daniel Acker/Bloomberg via Getty Images
LEESVILLE, SC - FEBRUARY 16: Republican presidential candidate Jeb Bush (L) signs an autograph on the cast of local resident Briannah Williams (R) who was injured from cheerleading as her mother Krystle Williams (2nd R) looks on during a campaign event at Shealy's Bar-B-Que February 16, 2016 in Leesville, South Carolina. Bush continued to campaign for the upcoming GOP primary in South Carolina. (Photo by Alex Wong/Getty Images)
BEAUFORT, SC - FEBRUARY 16: Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump speaks on stage during a campaign event on February 16, 2016 in Beaufort, South Carolina. Trump is leading in South Carolina polls just days before the state's primaries. (Photo by Spencer Platt/Getty Images)
LEESVILLE, SC - FEBRUARY 16: A welcome message is seen piror to a campaign event of Republican presidential candidate Jeb Bush at Shealy's Bar-B-Que February 16, 2016 in Leesville, South Carolina. Bush continued to campaign for the upcoming GOP primary in South Carolina. (Photo by Alex Wong/Getty Images)
John Kasich, governor of Ohio and 2016 Republican presidential candidate, speaks during a town hall event at Murray's Neighborhood Bar and Grill in Cayce, South Carolina, U.S., on Tuesday, Feb. 16, 2016. After deploying an all-in strategy in New England, where he finished behind billionaire Donald Trump, Kasich has a huge challenge ahead of the Feb. 20 South Carolina primary and the other races that will rapidly follow. Photographer: T.J. Kirkpatrick/Bloomberg via Getty Images
John Kasich, governor of Ohio and 2016 Republican presidential candidate, speaks during a town hall event at Murray's Neighborhood Bar and Grill in Cayce, South Carolina, U.S., on Tuesday, Feb. 16, 2016. After deploying an all-in strategy in New England, where he finished behind billionaire Donald Trump, Kasich has a huge challenge ahead of the Feb. 20 South Carolina primary and the other races that will rapidly follow. Photographer: T.J. Kirkpatrick/Bloomberg via Getty Images
Supporters pray during a campaign rally for Republican presidential candidate Ted Cruz in Anderson, South Carolina, February 16, 2016. / AFP / JIM WATSON (Photo credit should read JIM WATSON/AFP/Getty Images)
BLUFFTON, SC - FEBRUARY 17: Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump speaks to voters on February 17, 2016 in Bluffton, South Carolina. Trump addressed the Sun City Republicans with three days remaining before the South Carolina Republican primary. (Photo by Win McNamee/Getty Images)
Republican presidential candidate Ben Carson talks with supporters after speaking at a veteran's roundtable in Columbia, South Carolina, February 17, 2016. / AFP / JIM WATSON (Photo credit should read JIM WATSON/AFP/Getty Images)
Senator Marco Rubio, a Republican from Florida and 2016 Republican presidential candidate, speaks during a town hall event at the Omar Shrine Temple in Mount Pleasant, South Carolina, U.S., on Wednesday, Feb. 17, 2016. Donald Trump remains the front-runner in South Carolina, where Republican voters head to the polls on Saturday. According to a survey released Monday by Democratic pollster Public Policy Polling, Trump holds a 17-point lead over Senators Rubio and Ted Cruz, who are tied for second place. Photographer: Luke Sharrett/Bloomberg via Getty Images
Republican presidential candidate Ben Carson (R) looks at his watch as he rushes to his next event after speaking at a veteran's roundtable in Columbia, South Carolina, February 17, 2016. / AFP / JIM WATSON (Photo credit should read JIM WATSON/AFP/Getty Images)
Senator Ted Cruz, a Republican from Texas and 2016 presidential candidate, speaks during a press conference at the Hampton Inn and Suites in Seneca, South Carolina, U.S., on Wednesday, Feb. 17, 2016. Cruz says Donald Trump sent his lawyers cease and desist letters over a Cruz campaign ad that portrays Trump as pro-choice saying that if the Cruz campaign doesn't pull ad, they'll see immediate legal action to prevent the continued broadcast of this ad, according to Cruz. Photographer: Daniel Acker/Bloomberg via Getty Images
WALTERBORO, SC - FEBRUARY 17: Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump speaks to South Carolina voters on February 17, 2016 in Walterboro, South Carolina. Trump addressed the Lowcountry Sportsmen for Trump with three days remaining before the South Carolina Republican primary. (Photo by Win McNamee/Getty Images)
CHAPIN, SC - FEBRUARY 17: Republican presidential candidate Marco Rubio (R-FL) appears with South Carolina Gov. Nikki Haley at an event February 17, 2016 in Chapin, South Carolina. Haley endorsed Rubio in the state's upcoming primary. (Photo by Aaron P. Bernstein/Getty Images)
An attendee waves a crutch with an American flag during a campaign rally for Donald Trump, president and chief executive of Trump Organization Inc. and 2016 Republican Presidential candidate, not pictured, at a farm in Walterboro, South Carolina, U.S., on Wednesday, Feb. 17, 2016. Donald Trump remains the front-runner in South Carolina, where Republican voters head to the polls on Saturday. According to a survey released Monday by Democratic pollster Public Policy Polling, Trump holds a 17-point lead over Senators Rubio and Ted Cruz, who are tied for second place. Photographer: Luke Sharrett/Bloomberg via Getty Images
An attendee takes a selfie photograph with Donald Trump, president and chief executive of Trump Organization Inc. and 2016 Republican Presidential candidate, right, following a campaign rally at a farm in Walterboro, South Carolina, U.S., on Wednesday, Feb. 17, 2016. Donald Trump remains the front-runner in South Carolina, where Republican voters head to the polls on Saturday. According to a survey released Monday by Democratic pollster Public Policy Polling, Trump holds a 17-point lead over Senators Rubio and Ted Cruz, who are tied for second place. Photographer: Luke Sharrett/Bloomberg via Getty Images
A supporter of Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump wearing a Superman cape departs the Civic Center after a campaign rally in Sumter, South Carolina, February 17, 2016. / AFP / JIM WATSON (Photo credit should read JIM WATSON/AFP/Getty Images)
GREENVILLE, SC - FEBRUARY 17: Republican presidential candidate, Sen. Marco Rubio (R-FL) talks to moderator Anderson Cooper (R) during a commercial break of a CNN South Carolina Republican Presidential Town Hall February 17, 2016 in Greenville, South Carolina. The primary vote in South Carolina is February 20. (Photo by Alex Wong/Getty Images)
Fourteen-year-old supporters Kaylie Kilpatrick (C) and her friend James Hanna (L) pose dress like Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump during a campaign rally in Sumter, South Carolina, February 17, 2016. / AFP / JIM WATSON (Photo credit should read JIM WATSON/AFP/Getty Images)
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By winning both South Carolina and New Hampshire and holding leads in 13 states that hold Republican contests on March 1, Trump was arguably on track to win the nomination, an outcome that seemed astounding to contemplate when he entered the race last summer.

"It's going to be very difficult for him to be derailed at this point," said Hogan Gidley, who was a senior adviser to former Republican candidate Mike Huckabee.

The 69-year-old real estate billionaire and reality TV star was declared the winner in South Carolina about an hour after polls closed, and launched into a feisty victory speech.

"Let's put this thing away," Trump told cheering supporters in Spartanburg.

He denounced TV pundits for saying there could be enough anti-Trump votes to beat him when the race thins further.

"These geniuses," he said. "They don't understand that as people drop out, I'm going to get a lot of those votes also. You don't just add them together."

SEE ALSO: Hillary Clinton prevails over Bernie Sanders in Nevada caucuses

Trump easily defeated Florida Senator Marco Rubio and Texas Senator Ted Cruz, who were in a close fight for second place and the right to declare themselves the anti-Trump alternative.

With 99 percent of South Carolina precincts reporting, Trump had 32.5 percent, followed by Rubio with 22.5 percent and Cruz with 22.3 percent.

Cruz's inability to distinguish himself from Rubio in the state was a blow to his campaign, which had invested heavily there to rally support among South Carolina's large population of evangelical voters.

Trump's victory won him at least 44 of the state's 50 delegates, bringing his delegate count to 61, compared to 11 for Cruz and 10 for Rubio, according to a tally by Real Clear Politics. Republicans need 1,237 delegates to win the party nomination.

SANDERS SETBACK

It was Trump's second victory in a row, an outcome that frightens establishment Republicans but thrills the "throw-the-bums-out" conservative base of the party that has long been fed up with Washington.

The bellicose New York billionaire had created some last-minute drama in South Carolina after Pope Francis said on Thursday his views on U.S. immigration were "not Christian."

Trump, who has also advocated a ban on Muslim immigrants to counter domestic terror threats, stirred fresh controversy on Friday when he told a crowd about a U.S. general who was said to have dipped bullets in pigs' blood to kill Muslim prisoners a century ago.

Former Secretary of State Clinton's victory in the Nevada Democratic caucuses, meanwhile, could help calm worries among the Democratic establishment about the strength of her campaign.

Her result denied Sanders the breakthrough win he had sought in a state with a heavy minority population, but his ability to close a one-time double-digit polling lead for Clinton suggests the Democratic nominating race will be long and hard fought.

Photos from the Nevada Democratic Caucus:

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Nevada Democratic Caucus
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Trump wins decisively in South Carolina, Clinton clinches Nevada
LAS VEGAS, NV - FEBRUARY 20: Attendees watch caucus returns during a caucus day event for democratic presidential candidate former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton at Caesers Palace on February 20, 2016 in Las Vegas, Nevada. Hillary Clinton defeated Democratic rival U.S.Sen Bernie Sanders (I-VT) in the Nevada Democratic caucuses. (Photo by Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)
LAS VEGAS, NV - FEBRUARY 20: Democratic presidential candidate former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton embraces her husband former U.S. president Bill Clinton during a caucus day event at Caesers Palace on February 20, 2016 in Las Vegas, Nevada. Hillary Clinton defeated Democratic rival U.S.Sen Bernie Sanders (I-VT) in the Nevada Democratic caucuses. (Photo by Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)
HENDERSON, NV - FEBRUARY 20: Democratic presidential candidate Sen. Bernie Sanders (D-VT) gives a concession speech at the Henderson Pavilion on February 20, 2016 in Henderson, Nevada. Sanders lost to Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton in the Nevada caucus. (Photo by Ethan Miller/Getty Images)
Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton speaks to students at Del Sol High School, Friday, Feb. 19, 2016, in Las Vegas. (AP Photo/John Locher)
Democratic presidential candidate Sen. Bernie Sanders, I-Vt., center, waves to hotel workers at MGM Grand hotel and casino Saturday, Feb. 20, 2016, in Las Vegas. (AP Photo/Jae C. Hong)
People line up to participate in the Democratic caucus at the University of Nevada Saturday, Feb. 20, 2016, in Reno, Nev. (AP Photo/Marcio Jose Sanchez)
Precinct captain Hayley Hageman instructs people through a bullhorn at a Democratic caucus site at the University of Nevada Saturday, Feb. 20, 2016, in Reno, Nev. (AP Photo/Marcio Jose Sanchez)
Democratic presidential candidate Sen. Bernie Sanders, I-Vt., center, pauses for photos with hotel workers at MGM Grand hotel and casino Saturday, Feb. 20, 2016, in Las Vegas. (AP Photo/Jae C. Hong)
Democratic presidential candidate Sen. Bernie Sanders, I-Vt., left, is hugged by a hotel worker at Caesars Palace Friday, Feb. 19, 2016, in Las Vegas. (AP Photo/Jae C. Hong)
Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton visits with Harrah's Las Vegas employees on the day of the Nevada Democratic caucus, Saturday, Feb. 20, 2016, in Las Vegas. (AP Photo/John Locher)
A supporter listens to Democratic presidential candidate Sen. Bernie Sanders, I-Vt., at a rally Friday, Feb. 19, 2016, in Reno, Nev. (AP Photo/Jae C. Hong)
Actress Susan Sarandon walks onto the stage to introduce Democratic presidential candidate Sen. Bernie Sanders, I-Vt., at a rally Friday, Feb. 19, 2016, in Reno, Nev. (AP Photo/Jae C. Hong)
Democratic presidential candidate Sen. Bernie Sanders, I-Vt., and wife, Jane, wave as they arrive at a rally Friday, Feb. 19, 2016, in Henderson, Nev. (AP Photo/Jae C. Hong)
Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton speaks during a rally Friday, Feb. 19, 2016, in Las Vegas. (AP Photo/John Locher)
A woman listens to Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton speak during a rally Friday, Feb. 19, 2016, in Las Vegas. (AP Photo/John Locher)
Democratic presidential candidate Sen. Bernie Sanders, I-Vt., center, acknowledges the cheering crowd after a rally Friday, Feb. 19, 2016, in Henderson, Nev. (AP Photo/Jae C. Hong)
A man holds up signs while listening to Democratic presidential candidate Sen. Bernie Sanders, I-Vt., at a rally, Friday, Feb. 19, 2016, in Henderson, Nev. (AP Photo/Jae C. Hong)
Democratic presidential candidate Sen. Bernie Sanders, I-Vt., center, sings with musicians and actors after a rally Friday, Feb. 19, 2016, in Henderson, Nev. (AP Photo/Jae C. Hong)
Sara Watts, center, and other supporters cheer for Democratic presidential candidate Sen. Bernie Sanders, I-Vt., while waiting for the arrival of Sen. Sanders at a rally Friday, Feb. 19, 2016, in Henderson, Nev. (AP Photo/Jae C. Hong)
Students listen to Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton at Del Sol High School, Friday, Feb. 19, 2016, in Las Vegas. (AP Photo/John Locher)
Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton meets with students at Del Sol High School, Friday, Feb. 19, 2016, in Las Vegas. (AP Photo/John Locher)
Democratic presidential candidate, Sen. Bernie Sanders, I-Vt., speaks during a rally Friday, Feb. 19, 2016, in Reno, Nev. (AP Photo/Marcio Jose Sanchez)
LAS VEGAS, NV - FEBRUARY 20: Democratic presidential candidate Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-VT) and his wife, Jane O'Meara Sanders, (R) greet voters as they visit the Western High School caucus site on February 20, 2016 in Las Vegas, Nevada. Sanders and Hillary Clinton wait for the voters to weigh in as they head to the polls in the Democratic caucus. (Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images)
LAS VEGAS, NV - FEBRUARY 20: Voters chant as they wait in line to get into a Democratic caucus at Caesars Palace on February 20, 2016 in Las Vegas, Nevada. Nevada voters are caucusing to decide between Democratic presidential candidates Hillary Clinton and Sen. Bernie Sanders. (Photo by Ethan Miller/Getty Images)
A Senator Bernie Sanders, an independent from Vermont and 2016 Democratic presidential candidate, precinct captain arranges campaign buttons on a table ahead of the Nevada Democratic presidential caucus at Desert Oasis High School in Las Vegas, Nevada, U.S., on Saturday, Feb. 20, 2016. Today voters weigh in on the Democratic battle between Hillary Clinton and Bernie Sanders competing in the Nevada caucuses with Clinton believed to have the advantage in the western state because of its heavily Hispanic electorate, but some recent polls show the race tied. Photographer: Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images
Caucusgoers line up to check-in before casting their vote for a Democratic presidential candidate ahead of the Nevada caucus at Desert Oasis High School in Las Vegas, Nevada, U.S., on Saturday, Feb. 20, 2016. Today voters weigh in on the Democratic battle between Hillary Clinton and Bernie Sanders competing in the Nevada caucuses with Clinton believed to have the advantage in the western state because of its heavily Hispanic electorate, but some recent polls show the race tied. Photographer: Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images
LAS VEGAS, NV - FEBRUARY 20: Voters chant as they wait in line to get into a Democratic caucus at Caesars Palace on February 20, 2016 in Las Vegas, Nevada. Nevada voters are caucusing to decide between Democratic presidential candidates Hillary Clinton and Sen. Bernie Sanders (D-VT). (Photo by Ethan Miller/Getty Images)
Eligible caucus voters arrive at Del Sol Academy of the Performing Arts in Las Vegas to participate in First in the West presidential caucus on February 20, 2016. / AFP / John GURZINSKI (Photo credit should read JOHN GURZINSKI/AFP/Getty Images)
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With 90 percent of precincts reporting, the former first lady was leading with 52.6 percent of the vote to Sanders' 47.4 percent.

Clinton's victory gave her fresh momentum as she heads into the next contest in South Carolina on Feb. 27, where polls show her with a double-digit lead largely as a result of heavy support from black voters.

"Some may have doubted us, but we never doubted each other," she told cheering supporters at a victory rally in Las Vegas. "This is your campaign."

Sanders vowed to fight on and set his sights on the 11 states that vote on "Super Tuesday," March 1. He predicted that when Democrats gather for their nominating convention in Philadelphia in July, "We are going to see the results of one of the great political upsets in the history of the United States."

"The wind is at our backs," the Vermont senator said. "We have the momentum."

After routing Clinton in New Hampshire and finishing a strong second in Iowa, states with nearly all-white populations, Sanders had hoped to prove in Nevada that he could win over black and Hispanic voters and compete nationally as the race moves to states with more diverse populations.

But entrance polling in Nevada showed he badly lost among black voters, by 76 percent to 22 percent, a bad omen for South Carolina and other southern states with big black populations. He did win among Hispanics by 53 percent to 45 percent.

Clinton's campaign has argued she would assert control of the Democratic race once it moved to more diverse states with black and Hispanic populations who have traditionally backed Clinton and have been slow to warm to Sanders.

(Reporting by Luciana Lopez and Steve Holland; Writing by John Whitesides, Steve Holland and Richard Valdmanis; Editing by Andrew Hay and Mary Milliken)

Photos from the South Carolina primary vote:

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South Carolina Primary vote
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Trump wins decisively in South Carolina, Clinton clinches Nevada
NORTH AUGUSTA, SC - FEBRUARY 20: Wade Fulmer, 59, dressed in costume as a Civil War undertaker, registers to vote at the Belvedere First Baptist Church polling precinct after participating in the 151st Civil War reenactment of the Battle of Aiken on February 20, 2016 in North Augusta, South Carolina. A reeanctor since 1969, Fulmer was undecided only 30 minutes before voting. North Augusta, SC on February 20, 2016. Statewide voters will cast ballots today in the South Carolina Republican Presidential Primary, the 'first in the south.' (Photo by Mark Makela/Getty Images)
Supporters cheer and hold up placards during the election watch party for Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump in Spartanburg, South Carolina, February 20, 2016. / AFP / JIM WATSON (Photo credit should read JIM WATSON/AFP/Getty Images)
LEXINGTON, SC - FEBRUARY 20: Republican primary voters check in at American Legion Post 7 on February 20, 2016 in Lexington, South Carolina. Today's vote is traditionally known as the 'First in the South' primary. (Photo by Sean Rayford/Getty Images)
WEST COLUMBIA, SC - FEBRUARY 20: Republican primary voter Michael Rabun checks in at a polling location at American Legion Post 90 February 20, 2016 in West Columbia, South Carolina. Today's vote is traditionally known as the 'First in the South' primary. (Photo by Sean Rayford/Getty Images)
An electronic voting both stands inside a polling station inside the Family YMCA of Greater Laurens during the South Carolina Republican presidential primary election in Laurens, South Carolina, U.S., on Saturday, Feb. 20, 2016. With South Carolina polls closing at 7 p.m., voters will have their say in the Republican presidential contest as Donald Trump, who holds a commanding lead in most South Carolina polls, and five other Republican candidates face off. Photographer: T.J. Kirkpatrick/Bloomberg via Getty Images
Residents vote in the South Carolina Republican presidential primary election at a polling station inside the South Carolina National Guard armory in Mount Pleasant, South Carolina, U.S., on Saturday, Feb. 20, 2016. With South Carolina polls closing at 7 p.m., voters will have their say in the Republican presidential contest as Donald Trump, who holds a commanding lead in most South Carolina polls, and five other Republican candidates face off. Photographer: Luke Sharrett/Bloomberg via Getty Images
A poll volunteer holds a roll of 'I Voted' stickers as residents vote in the South Carolina Republican presidential primary election inside a polling station in Mount Pleasant, South Carolina, U.S., on Saturday, Feb. 20, 2016. With South Carolina polls closing at 7 p.m., voters will have their say in the Republican presidential contest as Donald Trump, who holds a commanding lead in most South Carolina polls, and five other Republican candidates face off. Photographer: Luke Sharrett/Bloomberg via Getty Images
LITTLE MOUNTAIN, SC - FEBRUARY 20: A sign sits in front of a polling station during the Republican presidential primary on February 20, 2016 in Little Mountain, South Carolina. Polls show New York businessman Donald Trump leading his closest rival U.S. Sen. Ted Cruz (R-TX). (Photo by Spencer Platt/Getty Images)
A man holds a Jeb Bush, former Governor Florida and 2016 Republican presidential candidate, campaign sign across the street from a polling station as residents vote in the South Carolina Republican presidential primary election in Charleston, South Carolina, U.S., on Saturday, Feb. 20, 2016. With South Carolina polls closing at 7 p.m., voters will have their say in the Republican presidential contest as Donald Trump, who holds a commanding lead in most South Carolina polls, and five other Republican candidates face off. Photographer: Luke Sharrett/Bloomberg via Getty Images
CAYCE, SC - FEBRUARY 20: Carl Selander walks out of American Legion Memorial Cayce Post 130 after voting for Ted Cruz in the Republican presidential primary on February 20, 2016 in Cayce, South Carolina. Today's vote is traditionally known as the 'First in the South' primary. (Photo by Sean Rayford/Getty Images)
'I Voted' stickers sit on a table in a polling station inside Our Savior Lutheran Church during the South Carolina Republican presidential primary election in Columbia, South Carolina, U.S., on Saturday, Feb. 20, 2016. With South Carolina polls closing at 7 p.m., voters will have their say in the Republican presidential contest as Donald Trump, who holds a commanding lead in most South Carolina polls, and five other Republican candidates face off. Photographer: Daniel Acker/Bloomberg via Getty Images
DENMARK, SC - FEBRUARY 20: Poll station officials have lunch while waiting for voters at the Denmark Depot polling precinct on February 20, 2016 in Denmark, South Carolina. Statewide voters will cast ballots today in the South Carolina Republican Presidential Primary, the 'first in the south.' (Photo by Mark Makela/Getty Images)
Residents vote in the South Carolina Republican presidential primary election at the Sears Shelter in Greenville, South Carolina, U.S., on Saturday, Feb. 20, 2016. With South Carolina polls closing at 7 p.m., voters will have their say in the Republican presidential contest as Donald Trump, who holds a commanding lead in most South Carolina polls, and five other Republican candidates face off. Photographer: T.J. Kirkpatrick/Bloomberg via Getty Images
CHAPIN, SC - FEBRUARY 20: Voters check in at a polling station at Amicks Ferry Fire Station February 20, 2016 in Chapin, South Carolina. Residents of South Carolina picked their candidate in the state Republican primary today. (Photo by Alex Wong/Getty Images)
COLUMBIA, SC - FEBRUARY 20: A voter casts her ballet at a polling station at Hand Middle School February 20, 2016 in Columbia, South Carolina. Residents of South Carolina picked their candidate in the state Republican primary today. (Photo by Alex Wong/Getty Images)
WEST COLUMBIA, SC - FEBRUARY 20: A poster for the South Carolina Republican presidential primary sits on a table at American Legion Post 79 on February 20, 2016 in West Columbia, South Carolina. Today's vote is traditionally known as the 'First in the South' primary. (Photo by Sean Rayford/Getty Images)
WEST COLUMBIA, SC - FEBRUARY 20: Corey Threatt, chairman of the West Columbia #3 polling station, waits to assist a voter in the South Carolina Republican presidential primary at American Legion Post 79 on February 20, 2016 in West Columbia, South Carolina. Today's vote is traditionally known as the 'First in the South' primary. (Photo by Sean Rayford/Getty Images)
Meggett, SC - FEBRUARY 20: A man and woman walk into the Meggett Town Hall polling station in Meggett, South Carolina on February 20, 2016. Statewide voters will cast ballots today in the South Carolina Republican Presidential Primary, traditionally known as the 'First in the South' primary. (Photo by Mark Makela/Getty Images)
Voters wait in line for a polling place to open at Eastlan Baptist Church, Saturday, Feb. 20, 2016 in Greenville, S.C. (AP Photo/Paul Sancya)
A South Carolina voter cast his ballot to vote in the Republican presidential primary Saturday, Feb. 20, 2016, in Lexington, S.C. (AP Photo/Matt Rourke)
A poll worker hands out ballot cards during voting in the South Carolina Republican Presidential Primary Saturday, Feb. 20, 2016, in Columbia, S.C. (AP Photo/John Bazemore)
South Carolina voters arrive to vote in the Republican presidential primary Saturday, Feb. 20, 2016, at Mt. Horeb United Methodist Church in Lexington, S.C. (AP Photo/Matt Rourke)
Zan Hardin holds her four-year-old daughter, Eleanor, after voting in the South Carolina Republican Presidential Primary Saturday, Feb. 20, 2016, in Columbia, S.C. (AP Photo/John Bazemore)
A South Carolina voter arrives to vote in the Republican presidential primary Saturday, Feb. 20, 2016, at Emmanuel Lutheran Church in West Columbia, S.C. (AP Photo/Matt Rourke)
Voters arrive for the South Carolina Republican presidential primary at Forest Lake Park Gym in Columbia, S.C., Saturday, Feb. 20, 2016. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)
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