By the numbers: 'To Kill a Mockingbird'

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Harper Lee Dies at 89

On Friday morning, the world learned of the passing of Harper Lee, the beloved author of one of the most influential books in American history, To Kill a Mockingbird.

One of two books that Lee had published (the other, Go Set a Watchman, hit stores last July), To Kill a Mockingbird both broke readers' hearts and filled them, all while making record-breaking history in so many regards.

SEE ALSO: 23 books Mark Zuckerberg thinks everyone should read

In honor of Lee's life and revolutionary (a word that doesn't even do her work justice) novel, we've laid out a by the numbers guide for you with all the stats you need to know about Mockingbird's success.

As Lee wrote herself amongst the pages of her famed novel:

Atticus told me to delete the adjectives and I'd have the facts.


Remove all of the praise and critical claim that devours Mockingbird and you're left with the numbers below--numbers that speak for themselves.

Thank you, Ms. Lee. You will be sorely missed.

750K-1M:

Estimated number of copies of To Kill a Mockingbird sold each year

40M:

Estimated number of copies of To Kill a Mockingbird that have been sold to date

2-4K:

Number of copies that To Kill a Mockingbird was originally estimated to sell in total

1964:

Year that Harper Lee stopped giving press interviews

1962:

Year that the To Kill a Mockingbird movie was released, starring Gregory Peck and Robert Duvall

1961:

Year that Harper Lee won a Pulitzer Prize for To Kill a Mockingbird

1960:

Year that To Kill a Mockingbird was published

89:

Harper Lee's age when she passed away

40:

Number of languages that To Kill a Mockingbird has been translated to today

10:

Number of languages that To Kill a Mockingbird was translated to during its first year

3:

Number of Academy Awards that the To Kill a Mockingbird movie won

3:

Number of Golden Globes that the To Kill a Mockingbird movie won

2.5:

Number of years that it took Harper Lee to write To Kill a Mockingbird


And just for kicks:

1:

To Kill a Mockingbird's ranking by an organization of British librarians on a list of books that everyone should read before they die

2:

The ranking of The Bible on that same list

RELATED: Harper Lee through the years
23 PHOTOS
Harper Lee through the years
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By the numbers: 'To Kill a Mockingbird'
circa 1960: American author Harper Lee smiling. (Photo by Hulton Archive/Getty Images)
Author of To Kill a Mockingbird Harper Lee, in local courthouse while visiting her home town. (Photo by Donald Uhrbrock/The LIFE Images Collection/Getty Images)
Author of To Kill a Mockingbird Harper Lee, while visiting her home town. (Photo by Donald Uhrbrock/The LIFE Images Collection/Getty Images)
Photo of Harper Lee, Pulitzer Prize winner in fiction for her novel 'To kill a Mockingbird.' The award was made on May 1, 1961. (AP Photo)
Harper Lee, 36, who gained fame with her first novel, "To kill a Mockingbird," says she's running just as scared as before her success. Her book, which came out in 1960, has since sold six million copies, won a Pulitzer prize and been made into a film recently nominated for an academy award. Harper Lee poses March 14, 1963. (AP Photo)
Watching the filming of a scene for the 1962 movie "To Kill a Mockingbird" are producer Alan Pakula and author Harper Lee, whose Pulitzer prize winning novel has been adapted for the screen. A south Alabama town that was the inspiration for the setting in Lee's book is finding itself as the backdrop for a real-life legal case involving allegations of racism at school. (AP Photo)
In an August 31, 2001, file image at the Stage Coach Cafe in Stockton, Ala., the author Harper Lee, who wrote 'To Kill a Mockingbird.' A recently-discovered sequel, 'Go Set a Watchman,' is due to be published in July 2015. (Terrence Antonio James/Chicago Tribune/TNS via Getty Images)
LOS ANGELES, CA - MAY 19: Writer Harper Lee attends the reception prior to the Library Foundation of Los Angeles 2005 Awards Dinner honoring Harper Lee at the Richard J. Riordan Central Library on May 19, 2005 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Stephen Shugerman/Getty Images)
LOS ANGELES, CA - MAY 19: Writer Harper Lee (R) receives her award at the Library Foundation of Los Angeles 2005 Awards Dinner honoring Harper Lee at the City National Plaza on May 19, 2005 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Stephen Shugerman/Getty Images)
Harper Lee (Photo by Lee Celano/WireImage)
Author Harper Lee (center) signs an original edition of 'To Kill a Mockingbird' (Photo by Lee Celano/WireImage)
NEW YORK - MARCH 13: (U.S. TABS AND HOLLYWOOD REPORTER OUT) Playwright Horton Foote and writer Harper Lee listen to actor Dame Edna read a poem as Foote is honored by the Signature Theatre Company on the eve of his 90th birthday at the Ritz Carlton March 13, 2006 in New York City. (Photo by Paul Hawthorne/Getty Images)
WASHINGTON - NOVEMBER 05: U.S. President George W. Bush (L) hangs a Presidential Medal of Freedom on the neck of Harper Lee (C), Pulitzer Prize winner and the author of 'To Kill A Mockingbird,' during a presentation ceremony for the medal's 2007 recipients in the East Room of the White House November 5, 2007 in Washington, DC. The Medal of Freedom is given to those who have made remarkable contributions to the security or national interests of the United States, world peace, culture, or other private or public endeavors. (Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)
WASHINGTON - NOVEMBER 05: U.S. President George W. Bush (R) takes Pulitzer Prize winner and 'To Kill A Mockingbird' author Harper Lee by the arm before presenting her with the 2007 Presidential Medal of Freedom in the East Room of the White House November 5, 2007 in Washington, DC. The Medal of Freedom is given to those who have made remarkable contributions to the security or national interests of the United States, world peace, culture, or other private or public endeavors. (Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)
WASHINGTON - NOVEMBER 05: Pulitzer Prize winner and 'To Kill A Mockingbird' author Harper Lee smiles before receiving the 2007 Presidential Medal of Freedom in the East Room of the White House November 5, 2007 in Washington, DC. The Medal of Freedom is given to those who have made remarkable contributions to the security or national interests of the United States, world peace, culture, or other private or public endeavors. (Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)
Pulitzer Prize-winning Alabama author, Harper Lee, accepts an award, Wednesday, Jan. 10, 2007, at the Davis Theater in Montgomery, Ala., on the occasion of a performance adaptation of her book "To Kill A Mockingbird," by Alabama high school students. (AP Photo/Kevin Glackmeyer)
Harper Lee, the 80-year-old Pulitzer Prize winning author of "To Kill A Mockingbird," shares a laugh with Gov. Bob Riley at the State Board of Education meeting on Thursday, Jan. 11, 2007, in Montgomery, Ala. Lee received a resolution commending her contribution to public education in the state. (AP Photo/Jamie Martin)
** FILE ** Harper Lee, the 80-year-old Pulitzer Prize winning author of "To Kill A Mockingbird," reacts to a vocal performance by Birmingham public school students at the State Board of Education meeting on Thursday, Jan. 11, 2007, in Montgomery, Ala. Lee received a resolution commending her contribution to public education in the state. (AP Photo/Jamie Martin)
FILE - In this Aug. 20, 2007 file photo, "To Kill A Mockingbird" author Harper Lee smiles during a ceremony honoring the four new members of the Alabama Academy of Honor, at the state Capitol in Montgomery, Ala. The ascendance of Tonja Carter, who worked in Lee's older sister Alice Leeâs law office before going to the University of Alabama law school, graduating in 2006 and becoming her partner, brought more aggressive legal tactics on Harper Leeâs behalf. (AP Photo/Rob Carr, File)
Pulitzer Prize-winning Alabama author, Harper Lee, talks to friends backstage, Wednesday, Jan. 10, 2007, at the Davis Theater in Montgomery, Ala., on the occasion of a performance adaptation of her book "To Kill A Mockingbird," by Alabama high school students. (AP Photo/Kevin Glackmeyer)
Copies of Harper Lee's 'Go Set a Watchman' are on display as part of a global release at a bookstore in Seoul on July 14, 2015. Copies of Lee's eagerly awaited, but controversial second novel flew off the shelves more than half a century after the groundbreaking success of 'To Kill a Mockingbird.' AFP PHOTO / JUNG YEON-JE (Photo credit should read JUNG YEON-JE/AFP/Getty Images)
Signs outside the old Monroe County Courthouse refer to "Go Set A Watchman" and Harper Lee on the afternoon of the book's release in the hometown of "To Kill a Mockingbird" author Harper Lee, in Monroeville, Ala., Tuesday, July 14, 2015. (AP Photo/Andrea Mabry)
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