Mark Cuban: This is the one presidential candidate I'd run with

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Mark Cuban: I'd Do a Better Job Than Donald Trump

Billionaire investor and Shark Tank host Mark Cuban said he won't run for president in 2016, but he's open to being Donald Trump's VP.

Former Hewlett-Packard chief Carly Fiorina and former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton are both technological illiterates. Florida senator Marco Rubio is too inexperienced to win the presidency. And Texas senator Ted Cruz is disturbingly reminiscent of red-baiting 1950s demagogue Joe McCarthy.

These are a few takes on the presidential race from billionaire investor, Shark Tank host, and Dallas Mavericks owner Mark Cuban, who spoke on Tuesday with Rita Cosby of WABC radio.

In a wide-ranging interview, Cuban discussed the candidates he likes--as well as those he disdains--and who should replace Antonin Scalia, the former Supreme Court Justice who died over the weekend. (Cuban declined to be interviewed for this story.)

See images of Cuban throughout the years:

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Mark Cuban: This is the one presidential candidate I'd run with
Dallas Mavericks owner Mark Cuban stands behind the Dallas bench in the opening minutes against the New York Knicks during their NBA game February 24, 2014 at Madison Square Garden in New York. The Mavericks won, 110-108. AFP PHOTO/Stan HONDA (Photo credit should read STAN HONDA/AFP/Getty Images)
PHOENIX, AZ - JANUARY 17: Owner Mark Cuban of the Dallas Mavericks looks on during the NBA game against the Phoenix Suns at US Airways Center on January 17, 2014 in Phoenix, Arizona. The Mavericks defeated the Suns 110-107. NOTE TO USER: User expressly acknowledges and agrees that, by downloading and or using this photograph, User is consenting to the terms and conditions of the Getty Images License Agreement. (Photo by Christian Petersen/Getty Images)
Dallas Mavericks NBA basketball team owner and business man Mark Cuban walks with his legal team to the federal courthouse after a break in his inside trading trial in Dallas, Wednesday, Oct. 16, 2013. Jurors in the federal government's insider-trading lawsuit against the billionaire began deliberating Wednesday in federal district court following a trial that spanned three weeks. (AP Photo/LM Otero)
Mark Cuban, Dallas Mavericks NBA basketball team owner and business man, speaks to the media outside the federal courthouse after a verdict in his inside trading trial in Dallas, Wednesday, Oct. 16, 2013. Jurors said that billionaire Mark Cuban did not commit insider-trading when he sold his shares in an Internet company in 2004 after learning of a development that would dilute the value of his investment. The jury in federal court found that the SEC failed to prove several key elements of its case, including that Cuban traded on nonpublic information. (AP Photo/LM Otero)
Billionaire Dallas Mavericks NBA basketball team owner Mark Cuban, center, walks with his legal team to the federal courthouse after a break in his insider trading trial in Dallas, Wednesday, Oct. 16, 2013. Jurors say billionaire Mark Cuban did not commit insider-trading when he sold his shares in an Internet company in 2004 after learning of a development that would dilute the value of his investment. The jury in federal court found that the SEC failed to prove several key elements of its case, including that Cuban traded on nonpublic information. (AP Photo/LM Otero)
Mark Cuban, billionaire owner of the Dallas Mavericks basketball team, speaks with members of the media as he exits federal court in Dallas, Texas, U.S., on Thursday, Oct. 3, 2013. Cuban said he doesn't recall details of a conversation in which he was allegedly warned that information he received about a company was confidential. Photographer: Mike Fuentes/Bloomberg via Getty Images
Mark Cuban, owner of the Dallas Mavericks basketball team, left, exits federal court in Dallas, Texas, U.S., on Monday, Sept. 30, 2013. Cuban goes to trial over regulators' claims he engaged in insider trading when he sold his stake in a Canadian Internet search company nine years ago. Photographer: Ben Torres/Bloomberg via Getty Images
LOS ANGELES, CA - NOVEMBER 24: TV personality Mark Cuban attends the 2013 American Music Awards Powered by Dodge at Nokia Theatre L.A. Live on November 24, 2013 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Charley Gallay/AMA2013/Getty Images for Dodge)
The Los Angeles Lakers' Kobe Bryant (24) is hugged Dallas Mavericks owner Mark Cuban after the Mavs' 90-82 win at the American Airlines Center in Dallas on Friday, Nov. 13, 2015. (Paul Moseley/Fort Worth Star-Telegram/TNS via Getty Images)
PHILADELPHIA,PA - NOVEMBER 16: Owner of the Dallas Mavericks Mark Cuban looks on against the Philadelphia 76ers at Wells Fargo Center on November 16, 2015 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania NOTE TO USER: User expressly acknowledges and agrees that, by downloading and/or using this Photograph, user is consenting to the terms and conditions of the Getty Images License Agreement. Mandatory Copyright Notice: Copyright 2015 NBAE (Photo by Jesse D. Garrabrant/NBAE via Getty Images)
PHILADELPHIA, PA - NOVEMBER 16: Mark Cuban, owner of the Dallas Mavericks, looks on prior to the game against the Philadelphia 76ers on November 16, 2015 at the Wells Fargo Center in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. NOTE TO USER: User expressly acknowledges and agrees that, by downloading and or using this photograph, User is consenting to the terms and conditions of the Getty Images License Agreement. (Photo by Mitchell Leff/Getty Images)
LOS ANGELES CA - OCTOBER 29: Mark Cuban, owner of the Dallas Mavericks, follows the action from behind the bench during the third quarter of the basketball game against Los Angeles Clippers at Staples Center October 29, 2015, in Los Angeles California. NOTE TO USER: User expressly acknowledges and agrees that, by downloading and or using this photograph, User is consenting to the terms and conditions of the Getty Images License Agreement. (Photo by Kevork Djansezian/Getty Images)
Mark Cuban, Investor, Entrepreneur and Owner, Dallas Mavericks, offers his critique to finalists at the Global Startup Showcase, as one of four judges at 2015 WSJD Live on October 20, 2015 in Laguna Beach, California. WSJ D Live brings together top CEOs, founders, pioneers, investors and luminaries to explore the most exciting tech opportunities emerging around the world. AFP PHOTO / FREDERIC J. BROWN (Photo credit should read FREDERIC J. BROWN/AFP/Getty Images)
Mark Cuban, billionaire owner of the National Basketball Association's (NBA) Dallas Mavericks basketball team, left, and his wife Tiffany Cuban arrive at a state dinner in honor of Chinese President Xi Jinping at the White House in Washington, D.C., U.S., on Friday, Sept. 25, 2015. The U.S. and China announced agreement on broad anti-hacking principles aimed at stopping the theft of corporate trade secrets though President Barack Obama pointedly said he has not ruled out invoking sanctions for violators. Photographer: Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images
Mark Cuban, billionaire owner of the National Basketball Association's (NBA) Dallas Mavericks basketball team, left, and his wife Tiffany Cuban arrive at a state dinner in honor of Chinese President Xi Jinping at the White House in Washington, D.C., U.S., on Friday, Sept. 25, 2015. The U.S. and China announced agreement on broad anti-hacking principles aimed at stopping the theft of corporate trade secrets though President Barack Obama pointedly said he has not ruled out invoking sanctions for violators. Photographer: Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images
SHARK TANK - Lori Greiner, Mark Cuban, Daymond John, Barbara Corcoran, Robert Herjavec and Kevin O'Leary is a 'Shark' on ABC's 'Shark Tank.' (Photo by Bob D'Amico/ABC via Getty Images)
SHARK TANK - Mark Cuban is a 'Shark' on ABC's 'Shark Tank.' (Photo by Bob D'Amico/ABC via Getty Images)
Dallas Mavericks' Mark Cuban in action during an NBA basketball game against the Philadelphia 76ers, Monday, Nov. 16, 2015, in Philadelphia. (AP Photo/Matt Slocum)
Dallas Mavericks owner Mark Cuban reacts to a call during the first half of an NBA basketball game against the Philadelphia 76ers, Monday, Nov. 16, 2015, in Philadelphia. (AP Photo/Matt Slocum)
Dallas Mavericks owner Mark Cuban jokes with Boston Celtics forward Jae Crowder (99) during the first quarter of an NBA basketball game in Boston Wednesday, Nov. 18, 2015. (AP Photo/Charles Krupa)
Dallas Mavericks owner Mark Cuban watches from the bench during the first half of an NBA basketball game against the Los Angeles Clippers, Thursday, Oct. 29, 2015, in Los Angeles. (AP Photo/Jae C. Hong)
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Cuban has not shied away from voicing his opinions about the 2016 presidential election on his blog and on Twitter. But the nearly 30-minute radio interview provided a forum where he could give a more comprehensive picture of his views, positioning himself as a fiscal conservative and a social liberal. Here are eight takeaways:

1. Vice President Cuban?

Cuban laid to rest the possibility that he may enter the presidential campaign in 2016. However, he left open whether he might run in the future. "I would never rule it out... the real question is, can a businessperson and entrepreneur do more to help the country than the president?" he asked. However, in another interview on Tuesday, on a Dallas sports radio program, Cuban reportedly said he'd consider running as vice president on a ticket with fellow billionaire Donald Trump. "As long as [Trump] said he'[d] listen to me in everything I said, we'd be OK," Cuban said.

2. Donald Trump isn't self-aware

Cuban tends to think that Trump has the most potential, though he'll need to change his tone. "He's been a breath of fresh air from the perspective that he speaks his mind," Cuban said. Trump's biggest problem, according to Cuban, is that he isn't very self-aware. He has a pragmatic side that will make him tone down some of his more extreme rhetoric, however.

3. Bernie Sanders is most interesting candidate

Of all the candidates, Cuban says he would most like to sit down with Vermont Senator Bernie Sanders, even though he objects to Sanders's stance as a democratic socialist and plan to levy a special tax on billionaires. "I'm like, yo dude, come on, I ... got here through hard work!" Cuban said.

4. Bloomberg should enter the race

Former New York City mayor Michael Bloomberg and Vice President Joe Biden would be welcome additions to the race, Cuban said. "We know his policies, from his time as mayor of New York," he said of Bloomberg. "We know where he stands on guns. We know where he stands on other issues. He's very, very progressive in a lot of respects on social issues and he's somewhat conservative on fiscal issues." As for Biden, Cuban said he'd be a better bet than Clinton, because he has a better chance of striking a middle ground with Republicans in Congress.

5. Clinton is too polarizing

Cuban said Clinton is too polarizing to win the presidency. "I think Hillary is smart, but she's just upset so many people on the other side, that it's going to be very, very difficult." Also, the imbroglio over her handling of classified email while she worked in the State Department shows she knows very little about technology, he said.

6. Ted Cruz is a disaster

As he has in recent weeks, Cuban saved most of his vitriol for Cruz. "He is Joe McCarthy reincarnate," Cuban said. "He ... labels the others, you know, and denigrates people who don't, who aren't pure in how they are. ...He's not the type of person who will accomplish anything. He's just obstructionist."

7. Choose a wild-card justice for Supreme Court

Regarding the highly polarized atmosphere around finding a successor to Scalia, Cuban said he'd choose someone who's independent-minded. "I would look to find the smartest, most open-minded person, who is able to say, you know what, where there's a liberal interpretation that's better suited for what's going on, fine," Cuban said. "If there is a conservative interpretation that's better suited, because that fits the law better, fine."

8. It's the economy, stupid

Finally, Cuban said the outcome of the election ultimately will be all about the economy: "There's so much uncertainty with markets, there's so much uncertainty with international finance, that people could start feeling the effects personally and that could change what they're focused on," he said.

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