Could Sandra Day O'Connor fill Antonin Scalia's Supreme Court vacancy?

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Could Sandra Day O'Connor Fill Antonin Scalia's Supreme Court Vacancy?

It's been more than a decade since Sandra Day O'Connor's retirement from the Supreme Court, but there's talk the 85-year-old former justice could fill the void left by the late Justice Antonin Scalia.

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An op-ed in The Baltimore Sun laid out the case for appointing O'Connor, including her age and political history:

"Republican leaders routinely tout President Reagan as an icon; a vote against confirming Justice O'Connor would be an admission that the patron saint of the modern Republican Party wasn't infallible."

RELATED: Possible selections to replace Scalia

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Potential replacements for Justice Scalia, SCOTUS
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Could Sandra Day O'Connor fill Antonin Scalia's Supreme Court vacancy?

Sri Srinivasan, Federal appeals court judge

(United States Department of Justice)

Judge Merrick Garland, U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit.

(AP Photo/Charles Dharapak, File)

District Judge Ketanji Brown Jackson

(Photo via the United States District Court for the District of Columbia)

Loretta Lynch, the current U.S. Attorney General. 

(Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images)

Paul Watford, currently a U.S. circuit judge for the Ninth Circuit.

(Photo by Bill Clark/Getty Images)

Patricia Ann Millett, on the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit, pictured here with Obama when she was nominated to that court.

(AP Photo/Manuel Balce Ceneta, File)

Sen. Amy Klobuchar, a Democrat from Minnesota.

(AP Photo/Susan Walsh)

California Attorney General Kamala Harris

(AP Photo/Ringo H.W. Chiu)

Jacquline Nguyen, the first Vietnamese American woman named to the state court in California.

(Photo by Ken Hively/Los Angeles Times via Getty Images)

Nevada Gov. Brian Sandoval withdrew his name after the Obama administration expressed interest in late February.

(AP Photo/Cathleen Allison, File)

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The conservative-leaning O'Connor -- the first female Supreme Court justice -- was nominated to the court by Ronald Reagan in 1981. Though that doesn't mean she falls fully in line with modern Republicans.

Senate Republicans say the next president, not Obama, should appoint the next justice.

"One more liberal justice and we will see our fundamental rights taken away," GOP presidential candidate Ted Cruz said in a FOX News interview.

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But in an exclusive interview with KSAZ, O'Connor disagreed.

"I don't agree. I think we need somebody there, now, to do the job. Let's get on with it," O'Connor told KSAZ.

In the same interview, O'Connor said the idea of Obama appointing her to serve a few years wasn't logical.

RELATED: Sandra Day O'Connor through the years

30 PHOTOS
Sandra Day O'Connor through the years
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Could Sandra Day O'Connor fill Antonin Scalia's Supreme Court vacancy?
PHOENIX, AZ - JANUARY 16: Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of the United States (Ret.) Sandra Day O'Connor poses before receiving the prestigious Anam Cara Award at the Irish Cultural Center on January 16, 2014 in Phoenix, Arizona. (Photo by Mike Moore/WireImage)
circa 1970: Supreme Court Judge Sandra Day O'Connor, the first woman to achieve the office, appointed by President Ronald Reagan. (Photo by MPI/Getty Images)
US jurist Sandra Day O'Connor is sworn in before the Senate Judiciary Committee at a confirmation hearing on her selection as a justice of the US Supreme Court. (Photo by Keystone/Consolidated News Pictures/Getty Images)
Supreme Court nominee Sandra Day O'Connor is shown on arrival at Washington National Airport, July 1981. (AP Photo/Charles Tasnadi)
President Reagan presents his Supreme Court nominee Sandra Day O'Connor to members of the press, July 15, 1981, in the Rose Garden at the White House prior to the start of a meeting between the two which took place in the Oval Office. (AP Photo)
Sandra Day O'Connor waves as she arrives at the U.S. Capitol in Washington in Sept. 1981, shortly after her nomination to the Supreme Court is confirmed by the Senate. Walking behind O'Connor are, from left, Sen. Barry Goldwater, R-Ariz., Attorney General William French Smith, Sen. Strom Thurmond, R-S.C., who chairs the Senate Judiciary Committee, and Sen. Dennis DeConcini, D-Ariz. (AP Photo/Scott Applewhite)
WASHINGTON, DC -- SEPTEMBER 25: Newly appointed Supreme Court Justice Sandra Day O'Connor stands in front of the US Supreme Court Building following her being sworn in, September 25, 1981, in Washington, DC. (Photo by David Hume Kennerly/Getty Images).
Sandra Day O'Connor, Associate Justice of the United States Supreme Court, is shown in 1982. (AP Photo)
Britain's Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher welcomes U.S. Supreme Court Justice Sandra Day O'Connor to 10 Downing Street, prior to talks at the Premier's residence, July 25, 1984. (AP Photo/Pool/John Redman)
Supreme Court Justice Sandra Day O'Connor delivers the commencement address at Wheaton College, May 25, 1985. She received an honorary degree. (AP Photo)
U.S. Supreme Court Justice Sandra Day O'Connor and her husband John J. O'Connor visit the Great Wall of China at Badaling, north of Beijing, Aug. 28, 1987. (AP Photo/Neal Ulevich)
Supreme Court Justice Sandra Day O'Connor poses for a photo in the Supreme Court Building, Washington, April 15, 1988. (AP Photo/Bob Daugherty)
The U.S. Supreme Court Justices pose together for an official portrait Nov. 9, 1990 in Washington. From left standing are: Associate Justices Anthony M. Kennedy, Sandra Day O'Connor, Antonin Scalia and David Souter. Seated from left are: Harry A. Blackmun, Byron White, Chief Justice William Rehnquist, Associate Justices Thurgood Marshall and John Paul Stevens. (AP Photo/Bob Daugherty)
United States Supreme Court Associate Justice Sandra Day O'Connor, 1992. (AP Photo)
Portrait of Sandra Day O'Connor, Assoiciate Justice of the Supreme Court of the United States, Washington, DC, December 3, 1993. (Photo by Ron Sachs/CNP/Getty Images)
384802 07: (FILE PHOTO) This undated file photo shows Justice Sandra Day O''Connor of the Supreme Court of the United States in Washington, DC. (Photo by Liaison)
U.S. Supreme Court Associate Justice Sandra Day O'Connor, listens to questions Saturday, Oct. 16, 1999, at Stanford University in Stanford, Calif. O'Connor, as well as Justices Anthony Kennedy and Stephen Breyer, all Stanford graduates, attended an open discussion regarding the influence of the Supreme Court on other countries' constitutional systems as part of Stanford's alumni week festivities. (AP Photo/Ben Margot)
U.S. Supreme Court Justice Sandra Day O'Connor walks pass an honor guard on the way to address the The Citadel Corps of Cadets Tuesday April 4, 2000, at the military college in Charleston, S.C. (AP Photo/Lou Krasky)
390456 01: Supreme Court Justice Sandra Day O''Connor and her husband John O''Connor leave the receiving line at the annual Opera Ball June 8, 2001 at the Swedish Embassy in Washington, DC. (Photo by Karin Cooper/Getty Images)
U.S. Supreme Court Justice Sandra Day O'Connor is shown before administering the oath of office to members of the Texas Supreme Court, Monday, Jan. 6, 2003, in Austin, Texas. (AP Photo/Harry Cabluck)
Justice Sandra Day O'Connor listens to Ohio State University law professors speak during a roundtable discussion at the university law school Friday, March 14, 2003, in Columbus, Ohio. (AP Photo/Jay LaPrete)
Supreme Court Justice Sandra Day O'Connor smiles after being awarded an honorary Doctor of Laws degree during commencement ceremonies at the George Washington University Law School Sunday, May 25, 2003, in Washington. (AP Photo/Rick Bowmer)
Associate Justice of the U.S. Supreme Court Sandra Day O'Connor listens during the 2004 9th Circuit Judicial Conference Thursday, July 22, 2004, in Monterey, Calif. (AP Photo/Ben Margot)
Supreme Court Justice Sandra Day O'Connor laughs during a discussion at the annual 9th Circuit convention in Spokane, Wash., Thursday, July 21, 2005. O'Connor said she was saddened by attacks on an independent federal judiciary and on deteriorating relations with Congress. Her comments came as Congress prepared for a confirmation fight over federal appeals court judge John G. Roberts, who was chosen by President Bush to replace her. (AP Photo/Elaine Thompson)
Former Supreme Court Justice Sandra Day O'Connor smiles after speaking at Southern Methodist University, Wednesday, April 4, 2007, in Dallas. O'Connor said Wednesday that she has grown weary of partisan attacks on judges and is dedicating her retirement to educating the public about the need for an independent judiciary. (AP Photo/Matt Slocum)
Retired United States Supreme Court Justice Sandra Day O'Connor acknowledges a joint session of the Florida legislature before addressing them concerning civics education on Tuesday, April 7, 2009 in Tallahassee, Fla.(AP Photo/Steve Cannon)
Retired Supreme Court Justice Sandra Day OâConnor accepts the Minerva Award during the Women's Conference Tuesday, Oct. 26, 2010, in Long Beach, Calif. (AP Photo/Matt Sayles)
Former Supreme Court Justice Sandra Day O'Connor at the National Constitution Center, Friday, Sept. 16, 2011, in Philadelphia. (AP Photo/Matt Rourke)
Former Supreme Court Justice Sandra Day O'Connor giving testimony before the Senate Judiciary Committee Full committee hearing on 'Ensuring Judicial Independence Through Civics Education' on July 25, 2012 in Washington, DC. AFP PHOTO/ Karen BLEIER (Photo credit should read KAREN BLEIER/AFP/GettyImages)
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