At least 400 live amid filth, crime, danger in Seattle's 'Jungle', assessment team says

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At least 400 live amid filth, crime, danger in Seattle's 'Jungle', assessment team says
A man walks around a tent blocking a sidewalk in Seattle on Wednesday, Feb. 17, 2016. Seattle voters have agreed to tax themselves four separate times since 1986 to pay for affordable housing. The mayor recently proposed raising another $290 million with another housing levy on the November ballot. (AP Photo/Elaine Thompson)
A woman walks a child past people asleep under Interstate 5 near downtown Seattle on Wednesday, Feb. 17, 2016. Even as homelessness declined slightly nationwide in 2015, it increased in urban areas, including Seattle, New York and Los Angeles. (AP Photo/Elaine Thompson)
Seattle Human Services Department Division Director Sola Plumacher, left, talks with Clayton Lewis, a resident in a temporary city-approved parking area for people living in their vehicles, in Seattle on Thursday, Feb. 11, 2016. Seattle voters have agreed to tax themselves four separate times since 1986 to pay for affordable housing. The mayor recently proposed raising another $290 million with another housing levy on the November ballot. (AP Photo/Elaine Thompson)
A cardboard shelter sits under a footbridge near Puget Sound in Seattle on Thursday, Feb. 11, 2016. Seattle voters have agreed to tax themselves four separate times since 1986 to pay for affordable housing. The mayor recently proposed raising another $290 million with another housing levy on the November ballot. (AP Photo/Elaine Thompson)
Seattle Human Services Dept. division director Sola Plumacher, left, talks with Clayton Lewis as they look over the remains of an RV that was destroyed in an accidental fire earlier in a homeless encampment, Thursday, Feb. 11, 2016, in Seattle. Lewis lives in his own recreational vehicle two spaces over. Two people were burned in the RV that was parked at a temporary zone designated by the city for homeless people living in RVs and cars. The fire was caused when cooking stove fuel accidentally spilled near a portable heater. About two dozen vehicles have been using the temporary parking area in Seattle's Interbay neighborhood. (AP Photo/Elaine Thompson)
Danny Fletcher, left, calls to his dogs as Joshua Madrid looks on in an old bus they share with three dogs in a temporary city-approved parking area for people living in their vehicles in Seattle. Fletcher, 32, who sleeps in his car at night, prefers the quiet of the parking zone to the harassment he faced in other parts of the city. "We just want a safe place. Give us a safe place to park where neighbors won't harass us," he said. "We're homeless. We're not diseased." (AP Photo/Elaine Thompson)
Harold McDuffie II, who says he has been homeless for three years, lies in a sleeping bag on a pedestrian bridge leading to the ferry dock in downtown Seattle on Tuesday, Feb. 9, 2016. Ten years ago, a coalition of leaders came up with a plan to end homelessness by 2015. In that time, the city and county built more than 6,300 housing units and helped nearly 40,000 people find homes. Yet the number of homeless people has continued to climb. (AP Photo/Ted S. Warren)
Harold McDuffie II, who says he has been homeless for three years, watches pedestrians pass by as he lies in a sleeping bag on a bridge leading to the ferry dock in downtown Seattle on Tuesday, Feb. 9, 2016. Seattle has the third-highest number of homeless people in the U.S. (AP Photo/Ted S. Warren)
Pedestrians walk above signs of a homeless encampment near a bridge over the Interstate 5 freeway in downtown Seattle on Tuesday, Feb. 9, 2016. Even as homelessness declined slightly nationwide in 2015, it increased in urban areas, including Seattle, New York and Los Angeles. (AP Photo/Ted S. Warren)
Clothing hangs from the handrail of stairs near the baseball stadium at a small homeless encampment in Seattle on Tuesday, Feb. 9, 2016. Mayor Ed Murray has committed millions of dollars to expand shelter beds and social services. (AP Photo/Elaine Thompson)
Joshua Madrid hugs his dog, Cheese, as Loki lies next to them in Madrid's bus, parked in a temporary city-approved area for people living in their vehicles in Seattle on Tuesday, Feb. 9, 2016. Seattle has the third-highest number of homeless people in the U.S. (AP Photo/Elaine Thompson)
A man lies in a tent with others camped nearby, under and near an overpass in Seattle on Tuesday, Feb. 9, 2016. Seattle has the third-highest number of homeless people in the U.S. (AP Photo/Elaine Thompson)
Dennis Berg secures a tarp over his 28-foot trailer parked in a temporary city-approved parking area for people living in their vehicles in Seattle on Tuesday, Feb. 9, 2016. Seattle has the third-highest number of homeless people in the U.S. (AP Photo/Elaine Thompson)
A tent sits under an on-ramp as traffic drives past during morning rush hour in Seattle on Tuesday, Feb. 9, 2016. Even as homelessness declined slightly nationwide in 2015, it increased in urban areas, including Seattle, New York and Los Angeles. (AP Photo/Elaine Thompson)
A small homeless encampment sits in view of overpasses and the baseball and football stadiums in Seattle on Tuesday, Feb. 9, 2016. Seattle voters have agreed to tax themselves four separate times since 1986 to pay for affordable housing. The mayor recently proposed raising another $290 million with another housing levy on the November ballot. (AP Photo/Elaine Thompson)
Joshua Madrid hauls garbage to a bin at a temporary city-approved parking area for people living in their vehicles in Seattle on Tuesday, Feb. 9, 2016. The city is taking steps to offer the homeless cleaner, safer places to stay. (AP Photo/Elaine Thompson)
Aaron Benedict Morman wakes up in a nest of sleeping bags and a foam pad beneath a viaduct as traffic passes near him in Seattle. Morman said that he's been homeless for over 30 years, the last two in Seattle on Tuesday, Feb. 9, 2016. (AP Photo/Elaine Thompson)
Jerald Weaver serves himself lunch at a grill at a city-sanctioned homeless encampment in Seattle on Tuesday, Feb. 9, 2016. Cities such as Seattle and Portland are trying new low-cost solutions such as the authorized homeless camps. (AP Photo/Elaine Thompson)
A man walks past a city-sanctioned homeless encampment of micro-homes and tents in front of apartments and condos in Seattle on Tuesday, Feb. 9, 2016. The Seattle area now ranks third in the nation in the number of housing units for the homeless. But it also has the third-highest number of homeless people. (AP Photo/Elaine Thompson)
Desiree Hoffman, left, takes in a donation at a city-sanctioned homeless encampment, from a woman who lives in a nearby neighborhood in Seattle on Tuesday, Feb. 9, 2016. Seattle voters have agreed to tax themselves four separate times since 1986 to pay for affordable housing. The mayor recently proposed raising another $290 million with another housing levy on the November ballot. (AP Photo/Elaine Thompson)
A man sits with his dog near downtown Seattle on Tuesday, Feb. 9, 2016. Seattle's struggle to respond to homelessness illustrates how challenging the issue is, particularly in one of the fastest-growing U.S. cities, in an area that is simultaneously dealing with skyrocketing rents, a heroin epidemic and declining federal housing support. (AP Photo/Ted S. Warren)
A makeshift shelter sits next to the Interstate 5 freeway in downtown Seattle on Tuesday, Feb. 9, 2016. Seattle has the third-highest number of homeless people in the U.S. (AP Photo/Ted S. Warren)
A tent lies under a bridge over the Interstate 5 freeway in Seattle on Tuesday, Feb. 9, 2016. Even as homelessness declined slightly nationwide in 2015, it increased in urban areas, including Seattle, New York and Los Angeles. (AP Photo/Ted S. Warren)
A tent and debris are shown next to the Interstate 5 freeway in downtown Seattle on Tuesday, Feb. 9, 2016. Some Seattle residents complain the city isn't acting fast enough to address the crime, drug use, garbage and other problems associated with unauthorized encampments. (AP Photo/Ted S. Warren)
Billy Meyer, who said he has been homeless in both Portland, Ore., and Seattle in the past year, holds a cardboard sign asking for help near a pedestrian bridge leading to the ferry dock in downtown Seattle on Tuesday, Feb. 9, 2016. (AP Photo/Ted S. Warren)
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SEATTLE -- It's been nearly three weeks since the deadly shooting inside the notorious homeless camp called "The Jungle."

But city leaders admit there is still no plan on how to handle the lawless, unregulated camp.

The assessment team believes at least 400 people live in the 3-mile long, 150-acre area.

The team released dozens of images in the new report. It shows piles of garbage, used needles, and human waste strewn across The Jungle, which reaches underneath and along I-5.

"We have great concerns for the people that are living there," said Jason Johnson, director of the Seattle Human Services Department.

Social workers believe The Jungle is so dangerous, addiction and homeless outreach services won't even go inside.

Nearly 50 people from city, county and state agencies toured the camp twice since a drug-deal gone bad ended with five people being shot in January. Two of the shooting victims died.

Assessors found more than 200 tents in the 150-acre area. Adding to the concerns, much of the human waste flows untreated into the Duwamish River.

"There's also a bad environment that's flowing over into the neighborhood," said Steve Charles, who lives in nearby Beacon Hill.

Charles worries about safety in his neighborhood and believes the unregulated homeless camp should be shut down.

"The fact that it's unregulated, unsanitary," he said, "That makes me lean towards dissolving it."

Seattle Police admit there is crime inside The Jungle -- rape, assault, and drugs run rampant. Assessors also found piles of stolen property, including computers, briefcases, luggage and bicycles.

On Wednesday, a fire erupted at another unsanctioned homeless camp in Interbay. Seattle Fire Chief Harold Scoggins worries if a similar fire happens inside The Jungle, it could spread to the brush and nearby neighborhoods.

"We have seen more than 250 fires in the last five years in this area," said Scoggins.

The Washington State Department of Transportation, which owns a majority of the land that The Jungle sits on, also found superficial damage to bridge structures under the freeway.

Finding a way to fulfill Gov. Jay Inslee's plan to repair 33 expansion joints will be tough if the camp is allowed to stay open.

"We try to work on top of the structure and implement a temporary repair if it happens at night or during the peak hours," said Dave McCormick with WSDOT.

Neighbors understand the issue of homelessness is complex, but some say allowing so many people to live in dangerous conditions is inhumane.

"You just can't have that many people," said Charles. "That's too many."

Officials admit a fix for the problem won't come quickly. The assessment team, lead by the Seattle Fire Department, will come up with a plan for what happens next.

Seattle Says 400 Live Amid Filth, Crime in 'The Jungle'
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