Many parents are increasingly terrified to feed their kids Nutella

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People are attacking Nutella on social media for allegedly containing "harmful" ingredients.

Blog posts such as "Say no to Nutella, it is poisoning you and your children," and "Why you'll want to think twice before feeding your kids Nutella" are being shared by thousands on Facebook.

The posts claim that the artificial ingredient vanillin, which Nutella contains, is a neurotoxin that kills brain cells.

The articles also attack Nutella's use of skim milk powder, soy lethicin (an emulsifier or lubricant), and palm oil.

"Nutella is actually probably one of the most poisonous products that you could buy for yourself," writes one Facebook user.

"I will not be eating Nutella ever again!" writes another.

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Many parents are increasingly terrified to feed their kids Nutella
Nutella spread from Italy, left, and made for the USA, in Canada. (Photo by Robert Gauthier/Los Angeles Times via Getty Images)
A child eats a tartine of Nutella on May 17, 2014 in Alba, northern Italy, during the celebrations of the 50th anniversary of Nutella, the chocolate hazelnut spread made by Ferrero. The first pot of the addictive mix was made in Alba in northwest Italy in April 1964. The anniversary celebrations begin in Alba and events are also being planned in 50 countries, including Canada, Germany, Russia and the United Arab Emirates, ending with a concert in New York on Monday. AFP PHOTO / GIUSEPPE CACACE (Photo credit should read GIUSEPPE CACACE/AFP/Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC May 28: Hazelnut-Chocolate Spread photographed on May 28, 2014 in Washington, DC. (Photo by Deb Lindsey for The Washington Post via Getty Images)
SAN FRANCISCO, CA - AUGUST 18: Jars of Nutella are displayed on a shelf at a market on August 18, 2014 in San Francisco, California. The threat of a Nutella shortage is looming after a March frost in Turkey destroyed nearly 70 percent of the hazelnut crops, the main ingredient in the popular chocolate spread. Turkey is the largest producer of hazelnuts in the world. (Photo by Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)
A man prepares tartines of Nutella on May 17, 2014 in Alba, northern Italy, during the celebrations of the 50th anniversary of Nutella, the chocolate hazelnut spread made by Ferrero. The first pot of the addictive mix was made in Alba in northwest Italy in April 1964. The anniversary celebrations begin in Alba and events are also being planned in 50 countries, including Canada, Germany, Russia and the United Arab Emirates, ending with a concert in New York on Monday. AFP PHOTO / GIUSEPPE CACACE (Photo credit should read GIUSEPPE CACACE/AFP/Getty Images)
TURIN, ITALY - 2015/06/11: From June 11-14, 2015 the Ice Cream Festival returns to the kermesse confectionery toured Italy and Europe until October. Among the various flavors to try there is also one inspired to last Expo of Milan. (Photo by Elena Aquila/Pacific Press/LightRocket via Getty Images)
LAS VEGAS, NV - MAY 09: Cookie butter mousse with salted pretzels and Nutella glaze desserts from Rao's are served at Vegas Uncork'd by Bon Appetit's Grand Tasting event at Caesars Palace on May 9, 2014 in Las Vegas, Nevada. (Photo by Ethan Miller/Getty Images for Vegas Uncork'd by Bon Appetit)
This Sept. 9, 2013 photo shows DIY Nutella marshmallow spread. (AP Photo/Matthew Mead)
TORONTO, ON - August 14: TORONTO, ON - Sweet potato fries with nutella. CNE food is sampled at Canadian National Exhibition's media day Wednesday August 14, 2013. (Tara Walton/Toronto Star via Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC - MAY 26: Chocolate Chunk Cookies made with Nutella in Washington, DC on May 25, 2010. (Photo by Linda Davidson / The Washington Post via Getty Images)
A knife scoops out Fererro SpA's Nutella chocolate-hazelnut spread in Milan, Italy, on Thursday, Nov. 19, 2009. Michele Ferrero sold his first batch of Nutella spread in 1964. Four decades later, Italy's richest man must decide whether his company fast-tracks overseas growth by starting an auction for Cadbury Plc, or sticks to its recipe of homegrown sweets. Photographer: Giuseppe Aresu/Bloomberg via Getty Images
Nutella pots on display in a creperie in Rome, Friday, June 18, 2010. To Italians Nutella is much more than chocolate-hazelnut spread. It's a cultural icon, the subject of memorable movie scenes, books and song lines. So it's no wonder that the mere suggestion that stricter European food labeling rules could harm the beloved product would have Italians up in arms. (AP Photo/Alberto Pellaschiar)
A woman eats a tartine of Nutella on May 17, 2014 in Alba, northern Italy, during the celebrations of the 50th anniversary of Nutella, the chocolate hazelnut spread made by Ferrero. The first pot of the addictive mix was made in Alba in northwest Italy in April 1964. The anniversary celebrations begin in Alba and events are also being planned in 50 countries, including Canada, Germany, Russia and the United Arab Emirates, ending with a concert in New York on Monday. AFP PHOTO / GIUSEPPE CACACE (Photo credit should read GIUSEPPE CACACE/AFP/Getty Images)
The bartender spreads Nutella on a crepe in a creperie in Rome, Friday, June 18, 2010. To Italians Nutella is much more than chocolate-hazelnut spread. It's a cultural icon, the subject of memorable movie scenes, books and song lines. So it's no wonder that the mere suggestion that stricter European food labeling rules could harm the beloved product would have Italians up in arms. (AP Photo/Alberto Pellaschiar)
SAN FRANCISCO, CA - AUGUST 18: Jars of Nutella are displayed on a shelf at a market on August 18, 2014 in San Francisco, California. The threat of a Nutella shortage is looming after a March frost in Turkey destroyed nearly 70 percent of the hazelnut crops, the main ingredient in the popular chocolate spread. Turkey is the largest producer of hazelnuts in the world. (Photo by Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)
Ferrero SpA's Duplo, Fererro Rocher, Nutella and Pocket Coffee chocolate products are arranged for a photograph in Milan, Italy, on Thursday, Nov. 19, 2009. Michele Ferrero sold his first batch of Nutella spread in 1964. Four decades later, Italy's richest man must decide whether his company fast-tracks overseas growth by starting an auction for Cadbury Plc, or sticks to its recipe of homegrown sweets. Photographer: Giuseppe Aresu/Bloomberg via Getty Images
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We reached out to Nutella parent company Ferrero for comment and will update this post when we hear back. Nutella contains seven ingredients: sugar, palm oil, hazelnuts, milk (skim milk powder and whey powder), cocoa, soy lethicin, and vanillin.

Vanillin is safe to consume and there is no evidence it kills brain cells, according to the United Nations' Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development.

"The use of vanillin as a food additive is approved by authorities worldwide," according to an OECD report. "During the present reviewing of the available toxicity data for vanillin, no particular risk has been identified which should give reason to concern or additional toxicity testing in animals."

On its website, Nutella says it contains synthetic vanillin, "which produces an aroma identical to the one naturally present in the vanilla pod" because "the production of vanilla pods is not enough to meet the escalating global demand."

Nutella has come under fire in the past for its use of palm oil, a saturated fat produced from the fruit of oil palm trees.

A French minister declared last year that consumers should not purchase Nutella if they want to help save the environment, saying the production of palm oil is a leading cause of deforestation.

Nutella says it obtains its palm oil comes from sustainable farms — a claim that is supported by the environmental group Greenpeace, according to Time.

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