Florida woman fears bees will force her out of her home

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Florida Woman Fears Bees Will Force Her Out of Her Home

A swarm of bees taking over your house is probably one of the most terrifying things imaginable -- and Kathy Shampo told WPTV that's what's happening to her Florida home.

"I just need somebody to come get them, kill them, whatever. Just please rid them. They've got to go," Shampo said.

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Shampo, who's allergic to bees, says she first noticed the problem six months ago, and a closer look revealed thousands of the insects could be under her home. She says she called several beekeepers, the city and the property owner, but she can't afford the cost of removal.

"If they make their way through the floor ... I can't afford to move. I won't have a place to live, and I'll be homeless. I'm too old to be homeless," Shampo says.

Shampo says she kills the bees when she can, but a beekeeper told WPTV that the situation will likely only get worse until the entire nest is removed.

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Florida woman fears bees will force her out of her home
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close up of honey bees flying
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HOMESTEAD, FL - MAY 19: A honeybee is seen at the J & P Apiary and Gentzel's Bees, Honey and Pollination Company on May 19, 2015 in Homestead, Florida. U.S. President Barack Obama's administration announced May 19, that the government would provide money for more bee habitat as well as research into ways to protect bees from disease and pesticides to reduce the honeybee colony losses that have reached alarming rates. (Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images)
A bee collects pollen in a sunflower field, Monday, Sept. 1, 2014, near Lawrence, Kan. The 40 acre field planted annually by the Grinter family draws bees and lovers of sunflowers alike during the weeklong late summer blossoming of the flowers. (AP Photo/Charlie Riedel)

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