Martin Shkreli might have been scammed out of $15 million for Kanye's new album

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Shkreli Claims He Was Scammed, But Don't Cry For Pharma Bro Just Yet

In keeping with his persona as a hip hop aficionado and public villain, Martin Shkreli recently sought to keep Kanye West's new "Life of Pablo" record from fans by buying it directly from the label for $15 million, but if his recent tweets are to be believed, he got scammed out of the money.

On Sunday, Shkreli tweeted that he came into contact with someone named "Daquan" and sent him a payment of $15 million via bitcoin to no result. The rest of his tweets were full of profanities and frantic ideas to get his money back.

Ultimately, he concluded that he would contact Satoshi, the creator of bitcoin, to get his money back.

See photos of Shkreli's infamous congressional hearing:

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Martin Shkreli's outrageous faces during congressional hearing, Turing Pharmaceutical
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Martin Shkreli might have been scammed out of $15 million for Kanye's new album
Martin Shkreli, former chief executive officer of Turing Pharmaceuticals LLC, reacts during a House Committee on Oversight and Government Reform hearing on prescription drug prices in Washington, D.C., U.S., on Thursday, Feb. 4, 2016. Shkreli, who is no longer with Turing and faces federal fraud charges unrelated to the drugmaker, declined to make any comments to the committee. 'On the advice of counsel, I invoke my Fifth Amendment,' Shkreli said. Photographer: Pete Marovich/Bloomberg via Getty Images
Entrepreneur and pharmaceutical executive Martin Shkreli listens during a hearing of the House Oversight and Government Reform Committee on Capitol Hill February 4, 2016 in Washington, DC. Martin Shkreli, the controversial former pharmaceuticals boss and hedge fund manager indicted on securities fraud charges, has been subpoenaed to appear at a hearing of a House of Representatives committee on oversight and government reform looking at the prescription drug market. / AFP / Brendan Smialowski (Photo credit should read BRENDAN SMIALOWSKI/AFP/Getty Images)
Entrepreneur and pharmaceutical executive Martin Shkreli waits for a car to pick him up after invoking his Fifth Amendment rights during a hearing of the House Oversight and Government Reform Committee on Capitol Hill February 4, 2016 in Washington, DC. Martin Shkreli, the controversial former pharmaceuticals boss and hedge fund manager indicted on securities fraud charges, has been subpoenaed to appear at a hearing of a House of Representatives committee on oversight and government reform looking at the prescription drug market. / AFP / Brendan Smialowski (Photo credit should read BRENDAN SMIALOWSKI/AFP/Getty Images)
Entrepreneur and pharmaceutical executive Martin Shkreli (L) leaves with his lawyer Benjamin Brafman after invoking his 5th Amendment rights during a hearing of the House Oversight and Government Reform Committee on Capitol Hill February 4, 2016 in Washington, DC. Martin Shkreli, the controversial former pharmaceuticals boss and hedge fund manager indicted on securities fraud charges, has been subpoenaed to appear at a hearing of a House of Representatives committee on oversight and government reform looking at the prescription drug market. / AFP / Brendan Smialowski (Photo credit should read BRENDAN SMIALOWSKI/AFP/Getty Images)
UNITED STATES - FEBRUARY 04: Martin Shkreli, center, former CEO of Turing Pharmaceuticals, leaves a House Oversight and Government Reform Committee in Rayburn Building on 'methods and reasoning behind recent drug price increases,' after invoking his Fifth Amendment right against self-incrimination, February 04, 2016. Turing had raised the price of Daraprim, a drug used by AIDS and cancer patients, from $13.50 to $750 a pill. (Photo By Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)
WASHINGTON, DC - FEBRUARY 04: Martin Shkreli, former CEO of Turing Pharmaceuticals LLC., is sworn in during a House Oversight and Government Reform Committee hearing on Capitol Hill, February 4, 2016 in Washington, DC. Shkreli invoked his 5th Amendment right not to testify to the committee that is examining the prescription drug market. (Photo by Mark Wilson/Getty Images)
Martin Shkreli, former chief executive officer of Turing Pharmaceuticals LLC, is sworn in during a House Committee on Oversight and Government Reform hearing on prescription drug prices in Washington, D.C., U.S., on Thursday, Feb. 4, 2016. Shkreli, who is no longer with Turing and faces federal fraud charges unrelated to the drugmaker, declined to make any comments to the committee. 'On the advice of counsel, I invoke my Fifth Amendment,' Shkreli said. Photographer: Pete Marovich/Bloomberg via Getty Images
Martin Shkreli, former chief executive officer of Turing Pharmaceuticals LLC, reacts during a House Committee on Oversight and Government Reform hearing on prescription drug prices in Washington, D.C., U.S., on Thursday, Feb. 4, 2016. Shkreli, who is no longer with Turing and faces federal fraud charges unrelated to the drugmaker, declined to make any comments to the committee. 'On the advice of counsel, I invoke my Fifth Amendment,' Shkreli said. Photographer: Pete Marovich/Bloomberg via Getty Images
(L-R)Howard Schiller, interim CEO of Valeant Pharmaceuticals International, Inc., Nancy Retzlaff, chief commercial officer for Turing Pharmaceuticals LLC, and Martin Shkreli, former CEO of Turing Pharmaceuticals LLC, wait for a hearing of the House Oversight and Government Reform Committee on Capitol Hill February 4, 2016 in Washington, DC. Martin Shkreli, the controversial former pharmaceuticals boss and hedge fund manager indicted on securities fraud charges, has been subpoenaed to appear at a hearing of a House of Representatives committee on oversight and government reform looking at the prescription drug market. / AFP / Brendan Smialowski (Photo credit should read BRENDAN SMIALOWSKI/AFP/Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC - FEBRUARY 04: Martin Shkreli, former CEO of Turing Pharmaceuticals LLC., smiles while flanked by Nancy Retzlaff, chief commercial officer for Turing Pharmaceuticals LLC., during a House Oversight and Government Reform Committee hearing on Capitol Hill, February 4, 2016 in Washington, DC. Shkreli invoked his 5th Amendment right not to testify to the committee that is examining the prescription drug market. (Photo by Mark Wilson/Getty Images)
Pharmaceutical chief Martin Shkreli listens on Capitol Hill in Washington, Thursday, Feb. 4, 2016, during the House Committee on Oversight and Reform Committee hearing on his former company's decision to raise the price of a lifesaving medicine. Shkreli refused to testify before U.S. lawmakers who excoriated him over severe hikes for a drug sold by a company that he acquired. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh)
Martin Shkreli, former chief executive officer of Turing Pharmaceuticals LLC, smiles during a House Committee on Oversight and Government Reform hearing on prescription drug prices in Washington, D.C., U.S., on Thursday, Feb. 4, 2016. Shkreli, who is no longer with Turing and faces federal fraud charges unrelated to the drugmaker, declined to make any comments to the committee. 'On the advice of counsel, I invoke my Fifth Amendment,' Shkreli said. Photographer: Pete Marovich/Bloomberg via Getty Images
Martin Shkreli, former chief executive officer of Turing Pharmaceuticals LLC, smiles during a House Committee on Oversight and Government Reform hearing on prescription drug prices in Washington, D.C., U.S., on Thursday, Feb. 4, 2016. Shkreli, who is no longer with Turing and faces federal fraud charges unrelated to the drugmaker, declined to make any comments to the committee. 'On the advice of counsel, I invoke my Fifth Amendment,' Shkreli said. Photographer: Pete Marovich/Bloomberg via Getty Images
Martin Shkreli, former chief executive officer of Turing Pharmaceuticals LLC, left, listens as his attorney Benjamin Brafman speaks the media after a House Committee on Oversight and Government Reform hearing on prescription drug prices in Washington, D.C., U.S., on Thursday, Feb. 4, 2016. Shkreli, who is no longer with Turing and faces federal fraud charges unrelated to the drugmaker, declined to make any comments to the committee. 'On the advice of counsel, I invoke my Fifth Amendment,' Shkreli said. Photographer: Pete Marovich/Bloomberg via Getty Images
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Though Shkreli remained confident he could get his money back, a $15 million dollar hit like this would throw salt on other financial wounds he's incurred lately, like the loss of $40 million on his E-Trade account, or the heavy legal fees he will owe to his high-profile attorney.

Here's the tweet where he announced he bought the album:

Followed not long after by this outburst:

And the follow up tweets:

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