Expert predicts Loretta Lynch will be Obama's pick to replace Scalia

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Expert Says Loretta Lynch Is Likely Obama's Pick to Replace Scalia

U.S. Attorney General Loretta Lynch might be the president's choice to replace Antonin Scalia on the Supreme Court.

She's the president's top pick according to Tom Goldstein of the highly respected SCOTUSblog, which covers all things relating to the Supreme Court. Goldstein predicts Obama wants a black nominee for the court and writes, "The fact that Lynch was vetted so recently for attorney general also makes it practical for the president to nominate her in relatively short order."

SEE MORE: What Justice Scalia's death means for these major SCOTUS cases

If she is the president's choice to replace Scalia, Lynch would likely be a hotly-contested pick in the Republican-controlled U.S. Senate. When she was confirmed to serve in her current role in the Obama administration, she faced criticism for her support of the president's move to block the deportations of roughly five million illegal immigrants.

The Senate took months to confirm her, in part because of a battle over abortion language in another piece of legislation that Democrats refused to relent on.

SEE ALSO: Powerful tweets reacting to the death of Justice Scalia that portray his complex legacy

As a high-ranking member of the Obama administration, she's been subject to additional conservative criticism, including her comments backing the president on recent gun control executive actions.

A handful of other names have been swirling about in the wake of Scalia's untimely passing, including Sri Srinivasan and Sen. Amy Klobuchar.

See some of the other rumored candidates below:
Potential replacements for Justice Scalia, SCOTUS
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Expert predicts Loretta Lynch will be Obama's pick to replace Scalia

Sri Srinivasan, Federal appeals court judge

(United States Department of Justice)

Judge Merrick Garland, U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit.

(AP Photo/Charles Dharapak, File)

District Judge Ketanji Brown Jackson

(Photo via the United States District Court for the District of Columbia)

Loretta Lynch, the current U.S. Attorney General. 

(Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images)

Paul Watford, currently a U.S. circuit judge for the Ninth Circuit.

(Photo by Bill Clark/Getty Images)

Patricia Ann Millett, on the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit, pictured here with Obama when she was nominated to that court.

(AP Photo/Manuel Balce Ceneta, File)

Sen. Amy Klobuchar, a Democrat from Minnesota.

(AP Photo/Susan Walsh)

California Attorney General Kamala Harris

(AP Photo/Ringo H.W. Chiu)

Jacquline Nguyen, the first Vietnamese American woman named to the state court in California.

(Photo by Ken Hively/Los Angeles Times via Getty Images)

Nevada Gov. Brian Sandoval withdrew his name after the Obama administration expressed interest in late February.

(AP Photo/Cathleen Allison, File)


Judge Jacqueline Nguyen is another name to watch. Born in Vietnam, she made history as the first Asian-American woman to sit on a federal appeals court.

California Attorney General Kamala Harris has also had her name floated — despite the fact that she's currently running to succeed outgoing Sen. Barbara Boxer.

Senate Republicans have already said they don't want President Obama to even have a say in choosing the next Supreme Court justice, insisting instead they'd rather that wait until a new president takes office next year.

More on this story:
Ruth Bader Ginsburg released a moving tribute to her 'best buddy,' Antonin Scalia
Justice Scalia's body found 'like he was taking a nap'
US Supreme Court Justice Scalia died of heart attack: Report
Critics react to Antonin Scalia's death with onslaught of insults
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