Mark Cuban: Here's why millennials love Bernie Sanders

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Could billionaire entrepreneur and Shark Tank host Mark Cuban be considering a run for president?

You'd think from the tone of a blog post he published Monday, entitled "Some Thoughts on the Presidential Race and Socio-capitalism," that it has at least crossed his mind. In the post, the outspoken Texas native ripped into candidates from both parties for what he perceives as a lack of leadership, poor understanding of technology, and an inability to craft a sound fiscal plan.

Read through these Mark Cuban business quotes to spark your motivation:

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Mark Cuban: Here's why millennials love Bernie Sanders

#1: "I still work hard to know my business. I'm continuously looking for ways to improve all my companies, and I'm always selling. Always."

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#2: "When you've got 10,000 people trying to do the same thing, why would you want to be number 10,001?"

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#3: "Because if you're prepared and you know what it takes, it's not a risk. You just have to figure out how to get there. There is always a way to get there."

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#4: "Go out there and get rich. Get so obnoxiously rich that when that tax bill comes, your first thought will be to choke on how big a check you have to write."

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#5: "​In the past, people used to tell me to shut up a bit. But what I believe is to put out your opinion and let everyone else react. If I'm wrong, I'm wrong."

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#6: "I've learned that it doesn't matter how many times you failed. You only have to be right once. I tried to sell powdered milk. I was an idiot lots of times, and I learned from them all."

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#7: "Work like there is someone working 24 hours a day to take it all away from you."

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#8: "Forget about finding your passion. Instead, focus on finding big problems."

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#9: "It's not about money or connections -- it's the willingness to outwork and outlearn everyone when it comes to your business. And if it fails, you learn from what happened and do a better job next time."

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#10: "What I've learned is that if you really want to be successful at something, you'll find that you put the time in. You won't just ask somebody if it's a good idea, you'll go figure out if it's a good idea."

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Cuban's post is well-timed, with the New Hampshire primaries getting underway Tuesday and polls showing many of the candidates running neck-and-neck. The rhetoric in the run-up to the primaries has at times turned ugly in debates and town halls, where asserting progressive or conservative bona fides and voicing extremist views have often usurped tackling issues voters care most about.

Writes Cuban about both Democrats and Republicans:

Bitching about everyone else is not leadership. It may play to the base, but it certainly doesn't reflect an ability to lead. This years (sic) candidates seem to want to prove to everyone that they conform to "party principles" rather than offering strategies and solutions and rallying consensus behind it. In fact, they argue with each other about who conforms to party standards more. IMHO, this is just crazy.

Just as galling to Cuban is the candidates' lack of understanding of the importance of technology, both as it affects business and society as a whole:

How can you hope to strategize and create solutions to issues we face without having more than a basic understanding of technology?... None [of the candidates] has given us any reason to believe they could make a decision on the technology used by a tiny business let alone the country.

Cuban says the candidates' lack of knowledge extends to their economic and tax plans, which include on the Democratic side increasing the progressive tax or installing a special tax on billionaires. On the Republican side it entails rewriting the tax code in favor of a simplified flat tax code that would significantly reduce revenues to the federal government.

There has never been an investor in the history of investors that has believed a 10 year projection in a business plan. Yet for some reason we allow candidates to deliver tax , healthcare and other financial plans over a 10 year period.

Like Democratic candidates Bernie Sanders and Hillary Clinton, Cuban acknowledges the problems inherent in the growing gap between the rich and poor, and the way the middle class is struggling:

Tax cuts won't do it. Redistribution of wealth might help in the short term, but won't solve the problem. The first step is to understand just what the budgets of underwater American families are and to look for ways to provide ways to cut those costs. Hopefully the free market can find answers.

As a solution, he cites millennials, who most frequently include an element of social entrepreneurship in their business plans. And he links their ideas and enthusiasm about using business to solve social problems to their support of Sanders' campaign:

How can it be a surprise that Millennials are excited about Bernie Sanders? Millennials EXPECT capitalism to reflect a socialist element. I don't think Bernie knew this going in. Either way, any candidate that expects to get millennial votes needs to understand that your father's capitalism is not ... how they understand the world. Soci0-Capitalism (sic) is who they are and what this country will be. Whether you like it or not.

See photos of millennials supporting Sanders:

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NTP: Bernie Sanders attracts millennials
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Mark Cuban: Here's why millennials love Bernie Sanders
IOWA CITY, IOWA-JANUARY 30: Students are ecstatic with Bernie Sanders as he arrives to a big rally at the University of Iowa. (Photo by Lucian Perkins /for The Washington Post via Getty Images)
IOWA CITY, IOWA-JANUARY 30: Bernie Sanders, a Democratic candidate for President of the U.S., attracts a huge crowd a rally at the University of Iowa. (Photo by Lucian Perkins /for The Washington Post via Getty Images)
Senator Bernie Sanders, an independent from Vermont and 2016 Democratic presidential candidate, center, and his wife Jane Sanders, center right, stand on stage as the song 'This Land is Your Land' is played during a campaign rally at the University of Iowa Field House in Iowa City, Iowa, U.S., on Saturday, Jan. 30, 2016. Hillary Clinton is holding onto a slim lead over Sanders in Iowa as Democrats prepare for Mondays caucuses, though an outpouring of young voters and those who say the system is rigged could enable Sanders to pull off an upset, according to a new poll. Photographer: Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images
DES MOINES, IA - JANUARY 29: Mark Foster of the band Foster the People performs at a concert in support of Democratic presidential candidate Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-VT) on January 29, 2016 in Des Moines, Iowa. The Democratic and Republican Iowa Caucuses, the first step in nominating a presidential candidate from each party, will take place on February 1. (Photo by Brendan Hoffman/Getty Images)
Attendees hold up campaign signs as Senator Bernie Sanders, an independent from Vermont and 2016 Democratic presidential candidate, speaks during a campaign rally at the University of Iowa Field House in Iowa City, Iowa, U.S., on Saturday, Jan. 30, 2016. Hillary Clinton is holding onto a slim lead over Sanders in Iowa as Democrats prepare for Mondays caucuses, though an outpouring of young voters and those who say the system is rigged could enable Sanders to pull off an upset, according to a new poll. Photographer: Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images
Senator Bernie Sanders, an independent from Vermont and 2016 Democratic presidential candidate, speaks during a campaign rally at the University of Iowa Field House in Iowa City, Iowa, U.S., on Saturday, Jan. 30, 2016. Hillary Clinton is holding onto a slim lead over Sanders in Iowa as Democrats prepare for Mondays caucuses, though an outpouring of young voters and those who say the system is rigged could enable Sanders to pull off an upset, according to a new poll. Photographer: Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images
An attendee holds an illuminated campaign sign for Senator Bernie Sanders, an independent from Vermont and 2016 Democratic presidential candidate, during a campaign rally at the University of Iowa Field House in Iowa City, Iowa, U.S., on Saturday, Jan. 30, 2016. Hillary Clinton is holding onto a slim lead over Sanders in Iowa as Democrats prepare for Mondays caucuses, though an outpouring of young voters and those who say the system is rigged could enable Sanders to pull off an upset, according to a new poll. Photographer: Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images
IOWA CITY, IOWA-JANUARY 30: Bernie Sanders, a Democratic candidate for President of the U.S., attracts a huge crowd a rally at the University of Iowa. (Photo by Lucian Perkins /for The Washington Post via Getty Images)
DES MOINES, IA - JANUARY 29: Andy Fleming and Dave Moore perform at a concert in support of Democratic presidential candidate Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-VT) on January 29, 2016 in Des Moines, Iowa. The Democratic and Republican Iowa Caucuses, the first step in nominating a presidential candidate from each party, will take place on February 1. (Photo by Brendan Hoffman/Getty Images)
DES MOINES, IA - JANUARY 29: Audience members attend a concert in support of Democratic presidential candidate Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-VT) on January 29, 2016 in Des Moines, Iowa. The Democratic and Republican Iowa Caucuses, the first step in nominating a presidential candidate from each party, will take place on February 1. (Photo by Brendan Hoffman/Getty Images)
DES MOINES, IA - JANUARY 29: Singers Jill Sobule, Kay Hanley, and Michelle Lewis (L-R) concert in support of Democratic presidential candidate Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-VT) on January 29, 2016 in Des Moines, Iowa. The Democratic and Republican Iowa Caucuses, the first step in nominating a presidential candidate from each party, will take place on February 1. (Photo by Brendan Hoffman/Getty Images)
Senator Bernie Sanders, an independent from Vermont and 2016 Democratic presidential candidate, waves as he arrives to speak during a campaign rally at the University of Iowa Field House in Iowa City, Iowa, U.S., on Saturday, Jan. 30, 2016. Hillary Clinton is holding onto a slim lead over Sanders in Iowa as Democrats prepare for Mondays caucuses, though an outpouring of young voters and those who say the system is rigged could enable Sanders to pull off an upset, according to a new poll. Photographer: Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images
IOWA CITY, IOWA-JANUARY 30: Bernie Sanders, a Democratic candidate for President of the U.S., attracts a huge crowd a rally at the University of Iowa. (Photo by Lucian Perkins /for The Washington Post via Getty Images)
Democratic presidential candidate Sen. Bernie Sanders, I-Vt., left, and Vampire Weekend lead singer Ezra Koenig wave during a campaign rally at the University of Iowa, Saturday, Jan. 30, 2016, in Iowa City, Iowa. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)
Democratic presidential candidate Bernie Sanders (C) stands with rock band Vampire Weekend's lead singer Ezra Koenig (R) after speaking at the University of Iowa in Iowa City, Iowa, January 30, 2016, ahead of the Iowa Caucus. / AFP / Jim WATSON (Photo credit should read JIM WATSON/AFP/Getty Images)
Lead singer of Vampire Weekend Ezra Koenig performs during a campaign rally for Democratic presidential candidate Sen. Bernie Sanders, I-Vt., at the University of Iowa, on Saturday, Jan. 30, 2016, in Iowa City, Iowa. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)
Attendees cheer as Senator Bernie Sanders, an independent from Vermont and 2016 Democratic presidential candidate, not pictured, leaves the stage during a campaign rally at the University of Iowa Field House in Iowa City, Iowa, U.S., on Saturday, Jan. 30, 2016. Hillary Clinton is holding onto a slim lead over Sanders in Iowa as Democrats prepare for Mondays caucuses, though an outpouring of young voters and those who say the system is rigged could enable Sanders to pull off an upset, according to a new poll. Photographer: Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images
Attendees dance to a David Bowie song after a Senator Bernie Sanders, an independent from Vermont and 2016 Democratic presidential candidate, campaign rally at the University of Iowa Field House in Iowa City, Iowa, U.S., on Saturday, Jan. 30, 2016. Hillary Clinton is holding onto a slim lead over Sanders in Iowa as Democrats prepare for Mondays caucuses, though an outpouring of young voters and those who say the system is rigged could enable Sanders to pull off an upset, according to a new poll. Photographer: Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images
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Finally, Cuban called upon the presidential hopefuls to step out of their party cocoons to connect with voters in more thoughtful ways.

"There are new ideas in this world that matter, Cuban writes. " It would be nice to get one from a Presidential candidate."

Cuban declined to be interviewed for this story, or to answer questions about a potential presidential run. If he does throw his hat in the ring, he'd join another billionaire entrepreneur, Donald Trump. A third member of that elite club, former New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg, has indicated he might run, also citing the various weaknesses of the current slate of candidates.

RELATED: 10 things you didn't know about Bernie Sanders

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10 things you don't know about Bernie Sanders
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Mark Cuban: Here's why millennials love Bernie Sanders

1. He's a socialist, and he doesn't deny it. When he ran for office in 1990 he responded to an ad trying to link him to Fidel Castro by saying,  "I am a socialist and everyone knows that."
 

(AP Photo/Toby Talbot, File)

2. He used to moonlight as a comedy actor, appearing in the 1999 film "My X-Girlfriends Wedding Reception."

(Photo by Win McNamee/Getty Images)

3. He is the longest-serving Independent member of Congress ever.

 (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)

4. He made headlines in in 2010 when he tried to block a deal that included a tax cut extension for the wealthy with a filibuster-like stand. The stunt trended on Twitter with the hashtag #filibernie and later crashed the Senate video server.

Photographer: Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images

5. He is not religious. While all past presidents have been openly religious and Christian, Sanders says he identifies as Jewish but doesn't practice. 

 (Photo by Win McNamee/Getty Images)

6. Despite being given an"F" rating by the NRA, Sanders has often voted in their favor. Once he voted to pass a bill that would prevent people from suing manufacturers, dealers and distributors when their products were misused.

(AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)

7. He grew up in a working class family in Brooklyn, and his father was a Polish immigrant.

 (Photo by Win McNamee/Getty Images)

8. He released an album called 'We Shall Overcome' in which he reads speeches about peace and justice with a choir singing in the background. It's available on iTunes. 

(Photo By Bill Clark/Roll Call/Getty Images)

9. He is a big believer in Scandinavian political thinking and has said that the U.S. should adopt some of their principles, including the idea that health care should be a right, and higher education should be free.

 (Photo By Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

10. Barack Obama campaigned for him when he ran for Senate in 2006.
(photo credit: AP)
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