These 50-foot mountains of glass make the Israeli desert look like another planet

Before you go, we thought you'd like these...

7 PHOTOS
Yeruham glass 'mountains'
See Gallery
These 50-foot mountains of glass make the Israeli desert look like another planet
In this Sunday, Jan. 24, 2016 photo, birds fly above broken glass later to be recycled at the Phoenicia Glass Works Ltd. factory in the southern Israeli town of Yeruham. Phoenicia Glass Works Ltd. produces a million bottles and containers a day for beverage giants Coca Cola, Pepsi, and Heineken, as well as Israeli wineries and olive oil companies. Every day, about 300,000 bottles come out of the ovens with defects. (AP Photo/Oded Balilty)
In this Sunday, Jan. 24, 2016 photo, broken glass bottles are piled up to be recycled at the Phoenicia Glass Works Ltd. factory in the southern Israeli town of Yeruham. Deep in the heart of Israelâs desert, shimmering mountains of glass dominate the landscape. Tiny shards, millions of them, are piled into rolling hills of green and brown. They are 50 feet high and span the length of a few soccer fields. (AP Photo/Oded Balilty)
In this Wednesday, Jan. 27, 2016 photo, a worker collects plastic bottles among piles of broken glass, later to be recycled at the Phoenicia Glass Works Ltd. factory in the southern Israeli town of Yeruham. Phoenicia Glass Works Ltd., Israelâs only glass container factory, produces one million containers a day. Some 300,000 bottles a day come out with defects, and the factory grinds them into shards and piles them in a desert lot to be melted into new bottles. The factory is in the middle of the desert, and works round the clock, every day of the year. (AP Photo/Oded Balilty)
In this Sunday, Jan. 24, 2016 photo, broken glass from bottles are piled up later to be recycled at the Phoenicia Glass Works Ltd. in the southern Israeli town of Yeruham. Tiny shards, millions of them, are piled into rolling hills of green and brown. They are 50 feet high and span the length of a few soccer fields. This is the junkyard at Israelâs only glass container factory, where broken glass awaits a new life. (AP Photo/Oded Balilty)
In this Tuesday, Jan. 26, 2016 photo, broken glass bottles are piled up later to be recycled at the Phoenicia Glass Works Ltd. factory in the southern Israeli town of Yeruham. Tiny shards, millions of them, are piled into rolling hills of green and brown. They are 50 feet high and span the length of a few soccer fields. This is the junkyard at Israelâs only glass container factory, where broken glass awaits a new life. (AP Photo/Oded Balilty)
In this Wednesday, Jan. 27, 2016 photo, broken glass bottles are piled up to be recycled at the Phoenicia Glass Works Ltd. factory in the southern Israeli town of Yeruham. Phoenicia Glass Works, Israelâs only glass container factory, produces one million containers a day. Tiny shards, millions of them, are piled into rolling hills of green and brown. They are 50 feet high and span the length of a few soccer fields. This is the junkyard at Israelâs only glass container factory, where broken glass awaits a new life. (AP Photo/Oded Balilty)
of
SEE ALL
BACK TO SLIDE
SHOW CAPTION +
HIDE CAPTION

In the Israeli town of Yeruham, located in the middle of the barren Negev desert, colorful mountains of glass reach 50 feet into the air. The Phoenicia Glass Works Ltd. factory, which both recycles old glass bottles and makes new ones from sand hauled in from the surrounding area, ends up producing thousands of defective bottles during production.

The imperfect bottles are ground up and tossed onto piles with the rest of the rejects, to be melted down later. Oded Bality, a Pulitzer Prize-winning Israeli photographer with the Associated Press, captured these otherworldly mounds of green, blue and brown shards which stretch the length of several soccer fields.

The Associated Press contributed reporting.

Read Full Story

People are Reading