Some people are saying a laptop can be seen in ancient Greek artifact

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Some People Are Saying A Laptop Can Be Seen In Ancient Greek Artifact
Is a laptop depicted in a carved-out gravestone from ancient Greece?

Some have raised the possibility that it is, indeed, a computer from the future.

The artifact in question is a 2,100-year-old funerary piece at the J. Paul Getty Museum which shows a woman looking at a flat object held open by her servant.

One line of thinking referenced by conspiracy theorists is that, during ancient times, gods bestowed advanced tools on to special members of society.

However, experts, not surprisingly, disagree with a supernatural assessment. One bioarchaeologist on Forbes.com has argued that the object could simply be a jewelry box or wax tablet, and the holes on the side aren't USB ports as claimed but perhaps indicators of components that are now missing.

The museum itself has stated that the item is a shallow chest.

Related: Graffiti artists tackle Greece's financial crisis:
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Graffiti artists tackle Greece's financial crisis
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Some people are saying a laptop can be seen in ancient Greek artifact
In this photo taken on Monday, June 22, 2015 a woman walks next a mural about the Greek financial crisis in Athens. Graffiti in Athens used to be all about football, politics or teenage crushes. Now, most of the serious work is inspired by the country’s financial and social woes. (AP Photo/Petros Giannakouris)
In this photo made on Saturday, June 20, 2015, a man walks past a graffiti work by Greek street artist Bleeps in Athens. Over the past five years of Greece’s economic depression, more and more paintings comment on the country’s financial and social woes. (AP Photo/Petros Giannakouris)
In this photo taken on Saturday, June 20, 2015, a man walks past a mural of a banknote resembling a US dollar bill by street artist N_Grams in Athens. Over the past five years of Greece’s economic depression, more and more paintings comment on the country’s financial and social woes. (AP Photo/Petros Giannakouris)
In this photo made on Saturday, June 20, 2015, a woman walks past two murals, on the right made by street artist EX!T and on the left, by N_Grams in Athens. Graffiti in Athens used to be all about football, politics or teenage crushes. Now, most of the serious work is inspired by the country’s financial and social woes. (AP Photo/Petros Giannakouris)
In this photo made on Thursday, June 18, 2015 a man walks behind a stencil depicting German Chancellor Angela Merkel as a Disney character in Athens. Over the past five years of Greece’s economic depression, more and more paintings comment on the country’s financial and social woes. (AP Photo/Petros Giannakouris)
In this photo made on Saturday, June 20, 2015, a man walks past graffiti titled "0 Euro" by street Artist Achilles in Athens. (AP Photo/Petros Giannakouris)
In this photo taken on Thursday, June 18, 2015 a man walks past a 2014 graffiti artwork titled "5€" by street artist Wild Drawing in Athens. Flanked by the shuttered windows of an abandoned old house, a haggard face supported in its hands looks out of a wall. On the crepitating stucco below, a battered 5-euro banknote is painted. (AP Photo/Petros Giannakouris)
In this photo taken on Thursday, June 18, 2015 a work called "I Need Job, Not Speech" by artist Wild Drawing. The mural refers to Greece's shockingly high unemployment rate, which despite a small decrease remains higher than 25 percent. (AP Photo/Petros Giannakouris)
In this photo taken on Thursday, June 18, 2015 a stencil work by an artist who uses the name Wild Drawing shows a fake road sign with a little car in the blue and white Greek colours tumbling off a crumbling euro currency sign into the water. It’s called “Keep Away.” Over the past five years of Greece’s economic depression, more and more paintings comment on the country’s financial and social woes. (AP Photo/Petros Giannakouris)
In this photo made on Wednesday, June 17, 2015 a woman walks past a graffiti artwork titled "Athena vs Europa, Resist vs Submit" by French street artist Goin at the Athens School of Fine Arts. Over the past five years of Greece’s economic depression, more and more paintings comment on the country’s financial and social woes. (AP Photo/Petros Giannakouris)
In this photo made on Wednesday, June 17, 2015 a woman walks past a graffiti by street artist Cacao Rocks in Athens. The idea for the work is three years old, the artist said, but added: “I have changed, I don’t take drugs any more or go to parties, but Europe just won’t grow up.” (AP Photo/Petros Giannakouris)
In this photo taken on Wednesday, June 17, 2015, a woman walks past a graffiti artwork titled "Death of Euros" made by French street artist Goin at the Athens School of Fine Arts. Over the past five years of Greece’s economic depression, more and more paintings comment on the country’s financial and social woes. (AP Photo/Petros Giannakouris)
A pedestrian passes graffiti, depicting a protester squeezing a Euro, in Athens Monday, June 22, 2015. European officials were cautious about the prospects of reaching a comprehensive deal on Monday to keep Greece from defaulting and falling out of the currency union, despite optimism in financial markets. (AP Photo/Thanassis Stavrakis)
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