Shimmering glass mountains lay hidden deep inside Israeli desert

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NTP: Mideast Israel glass mountains
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Shimmering glass mountains lay hidden deep inside Israeli desert
In this Sunday, Jan. 24, 2016 photo, birds fly above broken glass later to be recycled at the Phoenicia Glass Works Ltd. factory in the southern Israeli town of Yeruham. Phoenicia Glass Works Ltd. produces a million bottles and containers a day for beverage giants Coca Cola, Pepsi, and Heineken, as well as Israeli wineries and olive oil companies. Every day, about 300,000 bottles come out of the ovens with defects. (AP Photo/Oded Balilty)
In this Sunday, Jan. 24, 2016 photo, broken glass bottles later to be recycled at the Phoenicia Glass Works Ltd. factory in the southern Israeli town of Yeruham. Tiny shards, millions of them, are piled into rolling hills of green and brown. They are 50 feet high and span the length of a few soccer fields. This is the junkyard at Israelâs only glass container factory, where broken glass awaits a new life. (AP Photo/Oded Balilty)
In this Wednesday, Jan. 27, 2016 photo, a worker breaks defective glass bottles to be recycled at the Phoenicia Glass Works Ltd. factory in the southern Israeli town of Yeruham. Phoenicia Glass Works Ltd. produces a million bottles and containers a day for beverage giants Coca Cola, Pepsi, and Heineken, as well as Israeli wineries and olive oil companies. Every day, about 300,000 bottles come out of the ovens with defects. (AP Photo/Oded Balilty)
In this Wednesday, Jan. 27, 2016 photo, a worker breaks defective glass bottles to be recycled at the Phoenicia Glass Works Ltd. factory in the southern Israeli town of Yeruham. Factory workers grind these rejects into shards and pile them outside. Recycled glass bottles from across the country are sent here and ground up, too. The glass pieces are shoveled into the ovens to be fired into new glass bottles. Sand, the basic ingredient of glass, is hauled in from a nearby desert quarry. (AP Photo/Oded Balilty)
In this Wednesday, Jan. 27, 2016 photo, broken glass bottles are piled up later to be recycled at the Phoenicia Glass Works Ltd. factory in the southern Israeli town of Yeruham. Factory workers grind these rejects into shards and pile them outside. Recycled glass bottles from across the country are sent here and ground up, too. The glass pieces are shoveled into the ovens to be fired into new glass bottles. Sand, the basic ingredient of glass, is hauled in from a nearby desert quarry. (AP Photo/Oded Balilty)
In this Sunday, Jan. 24, 2016 photo, broken glass from bottles are piled up later to be recycled at the Phoenicia Glass Works Ltd. in the southern Israeli town of Yeruham. Tiny shards, millions of them, are piled into rolling hills of green and brown. They are 50 feet high and span the length of a few soccer fields. This is the junkyard at Israelâs only glass container factory, where broken glass awaits a new life. (AP Photo/Oded Balilty)
In this Wednesday, Jan. 27, 2016 photo, a worker collects plastic bottles among piles of broken glass, later to be recycled at the Phoenicia Glass Works Ltd. factory in the southern Israeli town of Yeruham. Phoenicia Glass Works Ltd., Israelâs only glass container factory, produces one million containers a day. Some 300,000 bottles a day come out with defects, and the factory grinds them into shards and piles them in a desert lot to be melted into new bottles. The factory is in the middle of the desert, and works round the clock, every day of the year. (AP Photo/Oded Balilty)
In this Sunday, Jan. 24, 2016 photo, broken glass bottles are piled up to be recycled at the Phoenicia Glass Works Ltd. factory in the southern Israeli town of Yeruham. Deep in the heart of Israelâs desert, shimmering mountains of glass dominate the landscape. Tiny shards, millions of them, are piled into rolling hills of green and brown. They are 50 feet high and span the length of a few soccer fields. (AP Photo/Oded Balilty)
In this Wednesday, Jan. 27, 2016 photo, broken glass bottles are piled up to be recycled at the Phoenicia Glass Works Ltd. factory in the southern Israeli town of Yeruham. Phoenicia Glass Works, Israelâs only glass container factory, produces one million containers a day. Tiny shards, millions of them, are piled into rolling hills of green and brown. They are 50 feet high and span the length of a few soccer fields. This is the junkyard at Israelâs only glass container factory, where broken glass awaits a new life. (AP Photo/Oded Balilty)
In this Wednesday, Jan. 27, 2016 photo, an employee carries a box of defective glass bottles to be recycled at the Phoenicia Glass Works Ltd. factory in the southern Israeli town of Yeruham. Factory workers grind these rejects into shards and pile them outside. Recycled glass bottles from across the country are sent here and ground up, too. The glass pieces are shoveled into the ovens to be fired into new glass bottles. Sand, the basic ingredient of glass, is hauled in from a nearby desert quarry. (AP Photo/Oded Balilty)
In this Tuesday, Jan. 26, 2016 photo, glass bottles move on the production line at the Phoenicia Glass Works Ltd. factory in the southern Israeli town of Yeruham. About 250 employees keep the factory running 24 hours a day, every day of the year. They even work on Yom Kippur, Judaismâs holiest day, when everything else in the country grinds to a halt. They canât turn off the ovens, because the molten glass lava will harden and clog them. (AP Photo/Oded Balilty)
In this Wednesday, Jan. 27, 2016 photo, workers unload defective glass bottles to be recycled at the Phoenicia Glass Works Ltd. factory in the southern Israeli town of Yeruham. Factory workers grind these rejects into shards and pile them outside. Recycled glass bottles from across the country are sent here and ground up, too. The glass pieces are shoveled into the ovens to be fired into new glass bottles. Sand, the basic ingredient of glass, is hauled in from a nearby desert quarry. (AP Photo/Oded Balilty)
In this Wednesday, Jan. 27, 2016 photo, glass bottles move on the production line at the Phoenicia Glass Works Ltd. factory in the southern Israeli town of Yeruham. Factory workers grind these rejects into shards and pile them outside. Recycled glass bottles from across the country are sent here and ground up, too. The glass pieces are shoveled into the ovens to be fired into new glass bottles. Sand, the basic ingredient of glass, is hauled in from a nearby desert quarry. (AP Photo/Oded Balilty)
In this Wednesday, Jan. 27, 2016 photo, an employee checks the quality of glass bottles on the production line at Phoenicia Glass Works Ltd. factory in the southern Israeli town of Yeruham. Phoenicia Glass Works, Israelâs only glass container factory, produces one million containers a day. Some 300,000 bottles a day come out with defects, and the factory grinds them into shards and piles them in a desert lot to be melted into new bottles. The factory is in the middle of the desert, and works round the clock, every day of the year. (AP Photo/Oded Balilty)
In this Tuesday, Jan. 26, 2016 photo, a worker pushes a wheelbarrow with broken glass bottles at the Phoenicia Glass Works Ltd. factory in the southern Israeli town of Yeruham. Factory workers grind these rejects into shards and pile them outside. Recycled glass bottles from across the country are sent here and ground up, too. The glass pieces are shoveled into the ovens to be fired into new glass bottles. Sand, the basic ingredient of glass, is hauled in from a nearby desert quarry. (AP Photo/Oded Balilty)
In this Wednesday, Jan. 27, 2016 photo, glass bottles move on the line of production at the Phoenicia Glass Works Ltd. factory in the southern Israeli town of Yeruham. Phoenicia Glass Works Ltd. produces a million bottles and containers a day for beverage giants Coca Cola, Pepsi, and Heineken, as well as Israeli wineries and olive oil companies. Every day, about 300,000 bottles come out of the ovens with defects. (AP Photo/Oded Balilty)
In this Sunday, Jan. 24, 2016 photo, a worker sweeps sand used to manufacture glass bottles at the Phoenicia Glass Works Ltd. factory in the southern Israeli town of Yeruham. Phoenicia Glass Works Ltd. produces a million bottles and containers a day for beverage giants Coca Cola, Pepsi, and Heineken, as well as Israeli wineries and olive oil companies. Every day, about 300,000 bottles come out of the ovens with defects. (AP Photo/Oded Balilty)
In this Wednesday, Jan. 27, 2016 photo, a worker smokes a cigarette at the Phoenicia Glass Works Ltd. factory in the southern Israeli town of Yeruham. Phoenicia Glass Works Ltd., Israelâs only glass container factory, produces one million containers a day. Some 300,000 bottles a day come out with defects, and the factory grinds them into shards and piles them in a desert lot to be melted into new bottles. The factory is in the middle of the desert, and works round the clock, every day of the year. (AP Photo/Oded Balilty)
In this Tuesday, Jan. 26, 2016 photo, a broken sign lies on the ground at the Phoenicia Glass Works Ltd. factory in the southern Israeli town of Yeruham. Phoenicia Glass Works Ltd. produces a million bottles and containers a day for beverage giants Coca Cola, Pepsi, and Heineken, as well as Israeli wineries and olive oil companies. Every day, about 300,000 bottles come out of the ovens with defects. (AP Photo/Oded Balilty)
In this Tuesday, Jan. 26, 2016 photo, broken glass bottles are piled up later to be recycled at the Phoenicia Glass Works Ltd. factory in the southern Israeli town of Yeruham. Tiny shards, millions of them, are piled into rolling hills of green and brown. They are 50 feet high and span the length of a few soccer fields. This is the junkyard at Israelâs only glass container factory, where broken glass awaits a new life. (AP Photo/Oded Balilty)
In this Wednesday, Jan. 27, 2016 photo, a worker breaks defective glass bottles to be recycled at the Phoenicia Glass Works Ltd. factory in the southern Israeli town of Yeruham. Phoenicia Glass Works Ltd. produces a million bottles and containers a day for beverage giants Coca Cola, Pepsi, and Heineken, as well as Israeli wineries and olive oil companies. Every day, about 300,000 bottles come out of the ovens with defects. (AP Photo/Oded Balilty)
In this Tuesday, Jan. 26, 2016 photo, broken glass bottles are piled up later to be recycled at the Phoenicia Glass Works Ltd. factory in the southern Israeli town of Yeruham. Tiny shards, millions of them, are piled into rolling hills of green and brown. They are 50 feet high and span the length of a few soccer fields. This is the junkyard at Israelâs only glass container factory, where broken glass awaits a new life. (AP Photo/Oded Balilty)
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Deep in the heart of Israel's desert, shimmering mountains of glass dominate the landscape. Tiny shards, millions of them, are piled into rolling hills of green and brown. Some grow to be 50 feet high, spanning the length of a few soccer fields. This is the junkyard at Israel's only glass container factory, where broken glass awaits a new life.

Phoenicia Glass Works produces a million bottles and containers a day for beverage giants Coca Cola, Pepsi, and Heineken, as well as Israeli wineries and olive oil companies. Every day, about 300,000 bottles come out of the ovens with defects, and the factory grinds them into shards and piles them in a desert lot to be melted into new bottles.

About 250 employees keep the factory running 24 hours a day, every day of the year. They even work on Yom Kippur, Judaism's holiest day, when everything else in the country grinds to a halt. They can't turn off the ovens, because the molten glass lava will harden and clog them.

Recycled glass bottles from across the country are sent here and ground up, too, while sand, the basic ingredient of glass, is hauled in from a nearby desert quarry.

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