The National debt climbs above $19 trillion

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The National Debt Climbs Above $19 Trillion

The U.S. is in the red. About $19 trillion in the red, actually.

According to the U.S. Department of the Treasury, the national debt broke records Friday when the total climbed over $19 trillion. But it didn't take too long to get there. The total rose by $1 trillion in about 13 months.

About $13.7 trillion of that debt is held by the public. Internal government borrowing makes up the rest at about $5.3 trillion.

Click through images of Republicans and the White House reaching a deal on the debt extension:

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Republicans, White House reach deal on debt extension
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The National debt climbs above $19 trillion
U.S. House Speaker John Boehner, a Republican from Ohio, arrives to a Republican meeting in the basement of the U.S. Capitol in Washington, D.C., U.S., on Tuesday, Oct. 27, 2015. President Barack Obama and top lawmakers from both parties reached a tentative budget agreement that would avert a U.S. debt default and lower chances of a government shutdown, lessening years of political friction over fiscal policy in Washington. Photographer: Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images
Representative Paul Ryan, a Republican from Wisconsin and chairman of the House Ways and Means Committee, speaks to members of the media as he arrives to a Republican meeting in the basement of the U.S. Capitol in Washington, D.C., U.S., on Tuesday, Oct. 27, 2015. President Barack Obama and top lawmakers from both parties reached a tentative budget agreement that would avert a U.S. debt default and lower chances of a government shutdown, lessening years of political friction over fiscal policy in Washington. Photographer: Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images
WASHINGTON, DC - OCTOBER 27: U.S. Speaker of the House Rep. John Boehner (R-OH) wipes tears during a news briefing after a House Republican Caucus meeting October 27, 2015 at the Capitol in Washington, DC. Congressional leaders had reached to an agreement with the White House to raise domestic and defense spending and lift the debt limit until March 2017. (Photo by Alex Wong/Getty Images)
House Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy, a Republican from California, arrives to a Republican meeting in the basement of the U.S. Capitol in Washington, D.C., U.S., on Tuesday, Oct. 27, 2015. President Barack Obama and top lawmakers from both parties reached a tentative budget agreement that would avert a U.S. debt default and lower chances of a government shutdown, lessening years of political friction over fiscal policy in Washington. Photographer: Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images
Representative Paul Ryan, a Republican from Wisconsin and chairman of the House Ways and Means Committee, speaks to members of the media as he arrives to a Republican meeting in the basement of the U.S. Capitol in Washington, D.C., U.S., on Tuesday, Oct. 27, 2015. President Barack Obama and top lawmakers from both parties reached a tentative budget agreement that would avert a U.S. debt default and lower chances of a government shutdown, lessening years of political friction over fiscal policy in Washington. Photographer: Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images
WASHINGTON, DC - OCTOBER 26: Speaker of the House John Boehner (R-OH) (R) tells reporters that he is 'cleaning out the barn, cleaning out the barn,' as he heads to a GOP conference meeting at the begining of his last week in the House of Representatives October 26, 2015 in Washington, DC. The White House and Boehner may be nearing a two-year budget deal that would avert another government shutdown, increase defense and defense spending by $80 billion and extend the debt limit through to March 2017, clearing it away until after the 2016 elections. (Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC - OCTOBER 26: House Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy (R-CA) (C) heads to the floor for votes following a GOP conference meeting in the U.S. Capitol October 26, 2015 in Washington, DC. The White House and House Republicans may be nearing a two-year budget deal, according to published reports, that would avert a government shudown, increase defense spending by $80 billion and extend the debt limit to March 2017, clearing it away until after the 2016 elections. (Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC - OCTOBER 26: Speaker of the House John Boehner (R-OH) (2nd R) tells reporters that he is 'cleaning out the barn, cleaning out the barn,' as he heads to a GOP conference meeting at the begining of his last week in the House of Representatives October 26, 2015 in Washington, DC. The White House and Boehner may be nearing a two-year budget deal that would avert another government shutdown, increase defense and defense spending by $80 billion and extend the debt limit through to March 2017, clearing it away until after the 2016 elections. (Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC - OCTOBER 26: House Budget Committee Chairman Paul Ryan (R-WI) (C) heads to the floor for a vote following a GOP conference meeting in the U.S. Capitol October 26, 2015 in Washington, DC. The White House and House Republicans may be nearing a two-year budget deal, according to published reports, that would avert a government shudown, increase defense spending by $80 billion and extend the debt limit to March 2017, clearing it away until after the 2016 elections. (Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)
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The federal government is free to borrow as much as it wants as long as it doesn't hit the debt ceiling. Late last year, the debt ceiling was suspended and borrowing spiked.

According to the Washington Examiner, the spike equaled about $339 billion in a single day.

As of now, the debt ceiling remains suspended and borrowing can continue without a limit until March 2017.

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