The 4 campaign issues that don't divide America

Before you go, we thought you'd like these...
Before you go close icon
Sanders to Focus on Economy, Campaign Finance in 2016

Republicans and Democrats agree that four main issues are of utmost importance in the 2016 presidential race -- even if they don't necessarily agree on how to address them.

SEE ALSO: How The Iowa Caucuses Work: A 6-Step Breakdown

Voters in both parties view candidates' positions on terrorism, the economy, healthcare and jobs as extremely important in influencing who they'll choose for president, according to a Gallup poll released on Monday.

Terrorism and national security as a single issue ranked as above average in importance for voters ahead of the February 1 Iowa Caucus, with 92 percent of Republicans and 82 percent of Democrats calling them extremely or very important in the campaigns, the poll found.

With that sentiment prominent in the backdrop, GOP frontrunner Donald Trump has sought to position himself as someone who will be tough in fighting ISIS. He also called for a ban on Muslims entering the United States "until we can figure out what's going on," and has said that refugees from Syria are "probably ISIS." His primary rival in the polls, Democratic frontrunner Hillary Clinton, has emphasized her experience as Secretary of State in convincing voters she is most qualified to defeat the terror group. Her plan involves "a more effective coalition air campaign, with more allied planes, more strikes and a broader target set," she said in November.

The economy is also critical for voters, ranking above average in importance to 92 Republicans and 85 Democrats, followed by jobs and employment. For 75 percent of Republicans and 83 percent of Democrats, healthcare and the Affordable Care Act were also labeled extremely important.

Beyond those key issues, though, Gallup found that Democrats and Republicans are pretty much divided over everything else. Democrats were more likely to say they care more about education and distribution of wealth, while Republicans were more likely to count the federal budget deficit, foreign affairs, size of the government, immigration and taxes as more important in the election.

Surprisingly, gun policy wasn't up there for either political party, even though it has become a central issue of the presidential campaign in the aftermath of several mass shootings.

The post The Four Campaign Issues That Don't Divide America appeared first on Vocativ.

Take a look around Iowa ahead of the caucuses:

23 PHOTOS
A look around Iowa ahead of the caucus
See Gallery
The 4 campaign issues that don't divide America
DES MOINES, IA - FEBRUARY 01: Supporters of Republican presidential candidate Rand Paul campaign for their candidate on a busy street corner during morning rush hour on February 1, 2016 in Des Moines, Iowa. The U.S. presidential election kicks off today with voters taking part in the Iowa Caucus. (Photo by Win McNamee/Getty Images)
DES MOINES, IA - JANUARY 31: The head of an Uncle Sam eagle sits on a bar stool at the Marriott hotel bar on January 31, 2016 in Des Moines, Iowa. The presidential selection officially kicks February 1 with the Iowa caucuses. (Photo by Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)
COUNCIL BLUFFS, IA - JANUARY 31: (EDITORS NOTE: Image was created with a smartphone.) Campaign buttons sit for sale on January 31, 2016 in Council Bluffs, Iowa. Candidates who are seeking the nominations from the Republican and Democratic Party are touring the state campaigning for votes before the Iowa caucus that takes place on February 1. (Photo by Christopher Furlong/Getty Images)
DES MOINES, IA - JANUARY 30: Cows are seen in a pasture on January 30, 2016 outside of Des Moines, Iowa. Candidates who are seeking the nominations from the Republican and Democratic Party are touring the state campaigning for votes before the Iowa caucus that takes place on February 1. (Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images)
DES MOINES, IA - JANUARY 30: An American flag is seen painted on a barn on January 30, 2016 outside of Des Moines, Iowa. Candidates who are seeking the nominations from the Republican and Democratic Party are touring the state campaigning for votes before the Iowa caucus that takes place on February 1. (Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images)
SIOUX CITY, IA - JANUARY 30: An old Chevrolet car sits outside an old factory on January 30, 2016 in Sioux City, Iowa. Candidates who are seeking the nominations from the Republican and Democratic Party are touring the state campaigning for votes before the Iowa caucus that takes place on February 1. (Photo by Christopher Furlong/Getty Images)
FENTON, IA - JANUARY 29: The sun sets behind wind turbines which the state uses to create nearly 30 percent of all electricity generated on January 29, 2016 in Fenton, Iowa. Candidates who are seeking the nominations from the Republican and Democratic Party are touring the state campaigning for votes before the Iowa caucus that takes place on February 1. (Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images)
FENTON, IA - JANUARY 29: A car is seen in the wall of a shed on January 29, 2016 in Fenton, Iowa. Candidates who are seeking the nominations from the Republican and Democratic Party are touring the state campaigning for votes before the Iowa caucus that takes place on February 1. (Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images)
MONONA COUNTY, IA - JANUARY 29: A classic Chevrolet pick-up truck sits a barn adorned by Americana memorabilia on January 29, 2016 in Carrol County, Iowa. Candidates who are seeking the nominations from the Republican and Democratic Party are touring the state campaigning for votes before the Iowa caucus that takes place on February 1. (Photo by Christopher Furlong/Getty Images)
FENTON, IA - JANUARY 29: A pro-life sign is posted in a field on January 29, 2016 in Fenton, Iowa. Candidates who are seeking the nominations from the Republican and Democratic Party are touring the state campaigning for votes before the Iowa caucus that takes place on February 1. (Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images)
CARROLL COUNTY, IA - JANUARY 29: A pro-life campaign poster sits in the vast grand plains of Iowa on January 29, 2016 in Carrol County, Iowa. Candidates who are seeking the nominations from the Republican and Democratic Party are touring the state campaigning for votes before the Iowa caucus that takes place on February 1. (Photo by Christopher Furlong/Getty Images)
MONONA COUNTY, IA - JANUARY 29: A poster supporting Republican presidential candidate Ted Cruz sits next to a Nativity scene outside the home of a supporter on January 29, 2016 in Carrol County, Iowa. Candidates who are seeking the nominations from the Republican and Democratic Party are touring the state campaigning for votes before the Iowa caucus that takes place on February 1. (Photo by Christopher Furlong/Getty Images)
DES MOINES, IA - JANUARY 28: Campaign signs regarding ethanol are seen January 28, 2016 in Des Moines, Iowa. Candidates who are seeking the nominations from the Republican and Democratic Party are all over the state looking for votes before the Iowa caucus that takes place on February 1. (Photo by Alex Wong/Getty Images)
DES MOINES, IA - JANUARY 28: A campaign billboard of Republican presidential candidate Jeb Bush is seen January 28, 2016 in Des Moines, Iowa. Candidates who are seeking the nominations from the Republican and Democratic Party are all over the state looking for votes before the Iowa caucus that takes place on February 1. (Photo by Alex Wong/Getty Images)
DES MOINES, IA - JANUARY 28: A giant poster of Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump stands in the backyard of a supporter in West Des Moines on January 28, 2016 in Des Moines, Iowa. Politicians are criss crossing the state looking for votes before the Iowa caucus takes place next week. (Photo by Christopher Furlong/Getty Images)
DES MOINES, IA - JANUARY 27: A sign sits outside the Des Moines headquarters of Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump in West Des Moines on January 27, 2016 in Des Moines, Iowa. Politicians are crisscrossing the state looking for votes before the Iowa caucus takes place next week. (Photo by Christopher Furlong/Getty Images)
CRESTON, IA - JANUARY 22: A man stands outside the headquarters for Democratic presidential candidate Bernie Sanders on January 22, 2016 in Creston, Iowa. Sanders, who is seeking the nomination from the Democratic Party is on the presidential campaign trail across Iowa ahead of the Iowa Caucus taking place February 1. (Photo by Joshua Lott/Getty Images)
URBANDALE, IOWA - JANUARY 22: Marsha Schoolcraft from Helotes, Texas, Mary Elizabeth Jackson from Tyler, Texas, and David Carter from Temple, Texas (L-R), all volunteers, phone bank at the campaign headquarters of Ted Cruz on January 22, 2016 in Urbandale, IA. The Democratic and Republican Iowa Caucuses, the first step in nominating a presidential candidate from each party, will take place on February 1. (Photo by Brendan Hoffman/Getty Images)
DES MOINES, IOWA - JANUARY 22: Pictures of Hillary Clinton adorn the wall in her campaign headquarters on January 22, 2016 in Des Moines, IA. The Democratic and Republican Iowa Caucuses, the first step in nominating a presidential candidate from each party, will take place on February 1. (Photo by Brendan Hoffman/Getty Images)
DES MOINES, IOWA - JANUARY 22: Stella Tsantekidou, 21, volunteers at the campaign headquarters of Bernie Sanders on January 22, 2016 in Des Moines, IA. The Democratic and Republican Iowa Caucuses, the first step in nominating a presidential candidate from each party, will take place on February 1. (Photo by Brendan Hoffman/Getty Images)
JOHNSTON, IOWA - JANUARY 22: A memorial dedicated to military veterans outside the public library on January 22, 2016 in Johnston, Iowa. The Democratic and Republican Iowa Caucuses, the first step in nominating a presidential candidate from each party, will take place on February 1. (Photo by Brendan Hoffman/Getty Images)
DES MOINES, IA - NOVEMBER 16: A political billboard features Republican presidential candidates (L-R) Sen. Marco Rubio (R-FL), Jeb Bush and Sen. Ted Cruz (R-TX) and paid for by Nextgen Climate Action Committee is seen November 16, 2015 in Des Moines, Iowa. Iowa will hold its caucus on February 1, 2016, the first in the primary season. (Photo by Alex Wong/Getty Images)
of
SEE ALL
BACK TO SLIDE
SHOW CAPTION +
HIDE CAPTION

Read Full Story

Sign up for Breaking News by AOL to get the latest breaking news alerts and updates delivered straight to your inbox.

Subscribe to our other newsletters

Emails may offer personalized content or ads. Learn more. You may unsubscribe any time.

From Our Partners