Tax season do's and don'ts

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How to Avoid Last-Minute Tax Errors

Before you know it, Tax Day will be here again. If you've made a couple of mistakes on your tax forms in previous years or you've had to file for an extension on more than one occasion, this is the perfect time to right those wrongs. We'll tell you exactly what you need to remember to do (and what you'll need to avoid doing) before the April 15th tax filing deadline.

Check out our federal income tax calculator.

Do: Double Check Your Math

Before you file your taxes, it's a good idea to review your forms and make sure all the numbers add up. The world won't come to an end if you miscalculate or enter incorrect information. But you will have to make time to submit an amended tax return.

If you're someone with a tight schedule and a lot of obligations on your plate, you'll want to do your taxes right the first time around. If you're unsure about something, you can always reach out to a tax professional or use our income tax calculator to get a sense of what your tax burden will be.

Don't: Use Last Year's Numbers

There's a reason why you're required to file taxes every year. Things change. Since the previous tax season, you could have gotten married, had a child or taken on a side gig. Bottom line: You don't want to just use the numbers that you wrote in on your 2013 or 2014 tax return. Doing so could delay your tax refund.

RELATED: Important tax dates to know

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Tax season do's and don'ts

January 15, 2016: Those who are self-employed or have fourth-quarter income that requires payment for quarterly estimated taxes must have them postmarked by this date

(Photo via Tetra Images/Getty Images)

April 18, 2016: Individual tax returns are due for the 2015 tax year

(Photo via Alamy)

April 18, 2016: Requests for an extension on filling out your taxes must be filed by this date

(Photo by Chris Fertnig via Getty Images)

April 18, 2016: Those who are self-employed or have first-quarter income that requires payment for quarterly estimated taxes must have them postmarked by this date

(Photo via Alamy)

April 18, 2016: This date is also the deadline to make a contribution to an IRA account for 2015

(Photo by Garry L., Shutterstock)

June 15, 2016: Those who are self-employed or have second-quarter income that requires payment for quarterly estimated taxes must have them postmarked by this date

(Photo via Shutterstock)

September 15, 2016: Those who are self-employed or have second-quarter income that requires payment for quarterly estimated taxes must have them postmarked by this date

(Photo via Shutterstock)

October 17, 2016: 2015 tax returns that received an extension are due by this date

(Photo by Juan Camilo Bernal via Getty Images)

October 17, 2016: Today is the last chance to recharacterize a traditional IRA that was converted to a Roth IRA during 2015

(Photo via Getty Images)

January 15, 2017: Those who are self-employed or have fourth-quarter income that requires payment for quarterly estimated taxes must have them postmarked by this date

(Photo by Pascal Broze via Getty Images)

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Do: Stay Organized

Your home might be a mess right now, but tax season is a great reason to get organized. You'll need to report certain details in order to fill out your forms and the process can be quite labor-intensive, particularly if you're self-employed or you're a business owner.

To keep your blood pressure from skyrocketing, it's best to have a system in place to keep track of old tax returns, other tax documents, receipts and records of income. That way, they're accessible when you need them.

SEE MORE: Married couples should file taxes separately if...

Don't: Wait Until the Last Minute

April 15th is the filing deadline, so you don't want to start working on your tax return on, say, April 10th. You might be the kind of person who works well under pressure. By procrastinating, however, you're more likely to make mistakes and forget something important, like your tax credits.

Related Article: How to File a Tax Extension

Do: Choose the Right Filing Status

According to the IRS, filing status errors are one of the most common mistakes that taxpayers make. It's a minor detail, but it can have big consequences if your tax bill is higher or lower than it's supposed to be. If you don't know which category you fall into, you can consult a tax preparer or use the interactive tax assistant on the IRS website.

Don't: Forget About Extra Sources of Income

Uncle Sam wants an accurate picture of how much money you have coming in. At this point, handing in your W-2 form is probably second nature. Aside from that, you'll need to be ready to report all of the earnings that aren't coming from your day job, such as your capital gains or other miscellaneous income.

Do: Consider Filing Online

There are several benefits that go along with filing your income tax return online. Filing online can save you both time and effort since tax preparation software can run all of the numbers for you. E-filing is also cheaper, more convenient and much safer than sending your tax return through snail mail. You'll also get your tax refund sooner if you file online.

Try out our property tax calculator.

Don't: Forget About Deductions

Tax deductions lower the amount of your income that's subject to taxation. So why wouldn't you try to round up as many deductions as possible? Once you have a clear sense of what you can deduct at tax time, you can create a plan that reduces your overall tax liability.

Bottom Line

Unless you don't mind paying penalties and interest on top of your unpaid tax bill, you'll want to file your returns on time every year. By keeping these dos and don'ts in the back of your mind, you can help your tax season go more smoothly.

The post Tax Season Dos and Don'ts appeared first on SmartAsset Blog.

RELATED: Ways to avoid a tax audit

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How to avoid a tax audit
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Tax season do's and don'ts

Double check your figures to assure there are no mistakes

(Photo via Shutterstock)

Be sure to be 100% honest, and report your numbers realistically

(Photo via Alamy)

Those in the highest and lowest income brackets are most often targets of fraud, and thus, audits

(Photo by Gary Conner via Getty Images)

Don't draw too much attention with unusual or unrealistic deductions

(Photo by Rita Maas via Getty Images)

Filing returns electronically drastically reduces errors

(Photo via Alamy)

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