Rhino visits conservancy after being released back into the wild

Before you go, we thought you'd like these...
Before you go close icon
Rhino Visits Conservancy After Being Released Back Into the Wild



A black rhino occasionally checks in on the people who rescued him.

Elvis was born on the Lewa Wildlife Conservancy in Kenya. Unfortunately, his mother was blind, so in an effort to ensure his survival, the people of Lewa decided to raise him themselves.

Because of poachers killing them for their horns, Rhinos are critically endangered and it's very important to keep as many of them alive as possible so they don't go extinct.

After four years of being raised by humans, Elvis was finally able to take care of himself and was reintroduced into the wild. The conservancy even de-horned him to keep him safe from poachers.



Elvis is thriving out there on his own, but he's not forgetting his roots - every once in a while, he visits the humans who helped him get back on his big rhino feet. He'll have a drink, take a stroll and even pop his head in to see what's cooking in the kitchen.

Kinda like when the seniors who graduated come back to visit high school after their first semester at college... only INFINITELY cooler.

See more photos from the Lewa Wildlife Conservancy:

19 PHOTOS
Lewa Wildlife Conservancy in Kenya, rhinos
See Gallery
Rhino visits conservancy after being released back into the wild
TO GO WITH AFP STORY Environment-species-rhinos-trafficking-Kenya-China,FEATURE BY HERVE BAR(FILES) This file picture taken on December 10, 2010 shows two male rhinoceros lock horns playfully while pasturing in the savanah at the Lewa Wildlife Conservancy. The bloody carcass is still lying in a dip between two hillocks. Melita, a black rhino aged 22, was killed by poachers on December 2 in Lewa private wildlife reserve. AFP PHOTO / ROBERTO SCHMIDT (Photo credit should read ROBERTO SCHMIDT/AFP/Getty Images)
This picture taken on May 21, 2015 shows elephants walking on a path at the Lewa Wildlife Conservancy at the foot of Mount Kenya, approximately 300 km north of the capital Nairobi. An estimated 470,000 wild elephants remain in Africa, according to a count by the NGO Elephants Without Borders, down from several million a century ago. AFP PHOTO / TONY KARUMBA (Photo credit should read TONY KARUMBA/AFP/Getty Images)
This picture taken on May 21, 2015 shows an elephant at the Lewa Wildlife Conservancy at the foot of Mount Kenya, approximately 300 km north of the capital Nairobi. An estimated 470,000 wild elephants remain in Africa, according to a count by the NGO Elephants Without Borders, down from several million a century ago. AFP PHOTO / TONY KARUMBA (Photo credit should read TONY KARUMBA/AFP/Getty Images)
TO GO WITH AFP STORY BY TRISTAN MCCONNELL A Black rhinocerous with a tranquiliser dart is cut-off by a capture-team vehicle from ambling into a water-pan as it succumbs to the effects of a sedative at the Lewa wildlife conservancy in Laikipia county, some 258 km north of the capital, Nairobi, on May 20, 2015. The adult male had been earmarked for translocation to form part of the gene pool that will spearhead the repopulation of a Samburu community-run coservancy Sera, further north. The critically endangered eastern black rhino (Diceros bicornis michaeli) is endemic to Kenya, where approximately 85% of the worlds remaining wild population of this sub-species remains and like many other conservancies in the area, Seras history is tainted with heavy poaching, tribal conflict, cattle rustling and road banditry. Sera Community Conservancy is now one of 26 conservancies within the Nothern Rangelands Trust chosen as the site for Kenyas first community-owned black rhino sanctuary. AFP PHOTO / TONY KARUMBA (Photo credit should read TONY KARUMBA/AFP/Getty Images)
A Kenya Wildlife Services (KWS) vet approaches a wild male black rhino named Sambu after it was tranquilized in Lewa conservancy on August 28, 2013. 11 of Lewa's total 73 endangered black rhinos are being moved to neighbouring Borana conservancy to afford them more space. Borana currently has no rhino population and is hoping to help increase their numbers. The horn of each rhino is cut and a tracking device is fitted to monitor its movements and to help combat poaching. Lewa has suffered severe poaching in the past. Illegally poached rhino horn is sold for large sums as an ingredient in some traditional Chinese medicine. AFP PHOTO/Carl de Souza (Photo credit should read CARL DE SOUZA/AFP/Getty Images)
Giraffe in sunset light at Lewa Conservancy, Kenya, Africa (Photo by Visions of America/UIG via Getty Images)
This picture taken on May 21, 2015 shows elephants at the Lewa Wildlife Conservancy at the foot of Mount Kenya, approximately 300 km north of the capital Nairobi. An estimated 470,000 wild elephants remain in Africa, according to a count by the NGO Elephants Without Borders, down from several million a century ago. AFP PHOTO / TONY KARUMBA (Photo credit should read TONY KARUMBA/AFP/Getty Images)
A captured wild male black rhino named Sero at Lewa Wildlife looks out from its crate at Lewa conservancy on August 26, 2013. Eleven of Lewa's total 73 endangered black rhinos are being relocated to neighboring Borana conservancy to afford them more space. Borana currently has no rhino population and is hoping to help increase their numbers. The horn of each relocated rhino is cut and a tracking device is fitted to monitor its movements and to help combat poaching. Lewa has suffered severe poaching in the past. Illegally poached rhino horn is sold for large sums as an ingredient in some traditional Chinese medicine. AFP PHOTO/Carl de Souza (Photo credit should read CARL DE SOUZA/AFP/Getty Images)
A Rhinoceros pastures in the savanah at the Lewa Wildlife Conservancy on December 10, 2010. Two rhinos were killed by poachers at the conservancy during 2010 and two in the last two months. Conservancy officials are alarmed by a sharp increase in the poaching activity which they say is fueled by a high demand for Rhino horns in Asia and especially China. Poachers can sell the horns to the first intermediary for about 8,000 USD per kilo as the two horns of an adult Rhino weight more or less 10 kilos. Spanning 62,000 acres, Lewa is home to more than 10 percent of KenyaÂs black rhino population and over 14 percent of KenyaÂs white rhino population. AFP PHOTO / ROBERTO SCHMIDT (Photo credit should read ROBERTO SCHMIDT/AFP/Getty Images)
This picture taken on May 21, 2015 shows an elephant taking a mud-bath at the Lewa Wildlife Conservancy at the foot of Mount Kenya, approximately 300 km north of the capital Nairobi. An estimated 470,000 wild elephants remain in Africa, according to a count by the NGO Elephants Without Borders, down from several million a century ago. AFP PHOTO / TONY KARUMBA (Photo credit should read TONY KARUMBA/AFP/Getty Images)
Vervit Monkey sitting in tree outside of Lewa Wildlife Conservancy, North Kenya, Africa (Photo by Visions of America/UIG via Getty Images)
(FILES) -- File photo taken in June 2003 shows staff members of the LEWA Wild Life Conservancy (a Kenyan based institution committed to the conservation of the wildlife and its environment) and of KWS (Kenyan Wildlife Services) hooding a reticulated giraffe to transfer it to another location for re-population purposes. A feature film by French director Frederic Lepage will retrace the renaissance of the Kenyan Meru park destroyed during the 70's by poachers. AFP PHOTO/NICOLAS GRANIER (Photo credit should read STRINGER/AFP/Getty Images)
TO GO WITH AFP STORY BY TRISTAN MCCONNELL A Black rhinocerous with a tranquiliser dart is cut-off by a capture-team vehicle from ambling into a water-pan as it succumbs to the effects of a sedative at the Lewa wildlife conservancy in Laikipia county, some 258 km north of the capital, Nairobi, on May 20, 2015. The adult male had been earmarked for translocation to form part of the gene pool that will spearhead the repopulation of a Samburu community-run coservancy Sera, further north. The critically endangered eastern black rhino (Diceros bicornis michaeli) is endemic to Kenya, where approximately 85% of the worlds remaining wild population of this sub-species remains and like many other conservancies in the area, Seras history is tainted with heavy poaching, tribal conflict, cattle rustling and road banditry. Sera Community Conservancy is now one of 26 conservancies within the Nothern Rangelands Trust chosen as the site for Kenyas first community-owned black rhino sanctuary. AFP PHOTO / TONY KARUMBA (Photo credit should read TONY KARUMBA/AFP/Getty Images)
Kenya Wildlife Services (KWS) rangers, vets and Lewa try to move a tranquilized wild female black rhino named Tupac at Lewa Wildlife conservancy on August 27, 2013. 11 of Lewa's total 73 endangered black rhinos are being moved to neighbouring Borana conservancy to afford them more space. Borana currently has no rhino population and is hoping to help increase their numbers. The horn of each rhino is cut and a tracking device is fitted to monitor its movements and to help combat poaching. Lewa has suffered severe poaching in the past. Illegally poached rhino horn is sold for large sums as an ingredient in some traditional Chinese medicine. AFP PHOTO/Carl de Souza (Photo credit should read CARL DE SOUZA/AFP/Getty Images)
TO GO WITH AFP STORY BY TRISTAN MCCONNELL A member of a rhino-translocation team at Lewa wildlife conservancy holds-on to the sawed-off tip of a rhino horn as others process a sedated Black rhinocerous for general health condition in the background at the Lewa wildlife conservancy in Laikipia county, some 258 km north of the capital, Nairobi, on May 20, 2015. The horn of the adult male was reduced before being fitted with a radio transmittion device at the Lewa wildlife conservancy in Laikipia county before being translocation to form part of the gene pool that will spearhead the repopulation of a Samburu community-run coservancy Sera, further north. The critically endangered eastern black rhino (Diceros bicornis michaeli) is endemic to Kenya, where approximately 85% of the worlds remaining wild population of this sub-species remains and like many other conservancies in the area, Seras history is tainted with heavy poaching, tribal conflict, cattle rustling and road banditry. Sera Community Conservancy is now one of 26 conservancies within the Nothern Rangelands Trust chosen as the site for Kenyas first community-owned black rhino sanctuary. AFP PHOTO / TONY KARUMBA (Photo credit should read TONY KARUMBA/AFP/Getty Images)
Masai in red robe and Camels and Acacia tree at Lewa Conservancy, Kenya, Africa (Photo by Visions of America/UIG via Getty Images)
A Cheetah sits in deep green grass and looks into the camera at Lewa Wildlife Conservancy, North Kenya, Africa (Photo by Visions of America/UIG via Getty Images)
TO GO WITH AFP STORY BY TRISTAN MCCONNELL A Black rhinocerous with a tranquiliser dart ambles as it succumbs to the effects of a sedative at the Lewa wildlife conservancy in Laikipia county, some 258 km north of the capital, Nairobi, on May 20, 2015. The adult male had been earmarked for translocation to form part of the gene pool that will spearhead the repopulation of a Samburu community-run coservancy Sera, further north. The critically endangered eastern black rhino (Diceros bicornis michaeli) is endemic to Kenya, where approximately 85% of the worlds remaining wild population of this sub-species remains and like many other conservancies in the area, Seras history is tainted with heavy poaching, tribal conflict, cattle rustling and road banditry. Sera Community Conservancy is now one of 26 conservancies within the Nothern Rangelands Trust chosen as the site for Kenyas first community-owned black rhino sanctuary. AFP PHOTO / TONY KARUMBA (Photo credit should read TONY KARUMBA/AFP/Getty Images)
of
SEE ALL
BACK TO SLIDE
SHOW CAPTION +
HIDE CAPTION


More from AOL.com:
Woman forgives car prowler in emotional Facebook message titled, 'What you don't know'
Mechanic pulls kitty from wheel after car starts 'meowing'
Watch: Pokemon celebrates 20 years with Super Bowl ad

Read Full Story

Sign up for Breaking News by AOL to get the latest breaking news alerts and updates delivered straight to your inbox.

Subscribe to our other newsletters

Emails may offer personalized content or ads. Learn more. You may unsubscribe any time.

From Our Partners