Things to know about the massive weekend blizzard

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'Life-Threatening Blizzard' Sweeps Across U.S. East Coast

A massive blizzard that blanketed much of the eastern United States set records, paralyzed travel and damaged property. Here's a look at the storm's impact:

WHO GOT IT WORST?

Glengary, West Virginia, can boast it took the storm's biggest blow: 42 inches. Several other spots saw more than three feet, according to the National Weather Service: 40.5 inches in Shepherdstown, West Virginia; 39 inches each in Philomont, Virginia, and Jones Springs, West Virginia; 38 inches in both Gainsboro, Virginia, and Redhouse, Maryland; 37 in Clear Spring, Maryland; and 36.9 in Mechanicsburg, Pennsylvania.

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Among major cities, New York got 26.8 inches in Central Park. The bulk of that — 26.6 inches — fell on Saturday, making that 24-hour period the snowiest on record, according to the NWS. The entire storm was the second-biggest on record for the city, falling just a tenth of an inch short of one from February 2006.

Washington recorded 22.4 inches at the National Zoo. Philadelphia also recorded 22.4 inches — exactly matching the average snowfall for the entire season.

Elsewhere, Baltimore got 16 inches; Richmond, Virginia, got 11.4; and Boston saw 8.2.

The blizzard also packed some serious winds, gusting up to 75 mph at Delaware's Dewey Beach and Virginia's Langley Air Force Base. Three spots in Massachusetts also tallied winds of 70 mph or more.

See photos of the massive blizzard:

53 PHOTOS
#Blizzard2016 slams the east coast, Winter Storm Jonas, snow, weather
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Things to know about the massive weekend blizzard
Snow is cleared along a street in the Upper West Side neighborhood of New York Sunday, Jan. 24, 2016, in the wake of a storm that dumped heavy snow along the East Coast. (AP Photo/Craig Ruttle)
Steven Campbell of Dallas Texas digs out his car as area residents dig out from a massive snowstorm in Richmond, Va., Sunday, Jan. 24, 2016. Campbell said it was the most snow he had seen in his lifetime and was regretful that he parked on a corner that got his car trapped by packed snow. (AP Photo/Steve Helber)
Crews work to remove the snow from I-395 Sunday, Jan. 24, 2016 in Washington. Millions of Americans were preparing to dig themselves out Sunday after a mammoth blizzard with hurricane-force winds and record-setting snowfall brought much of the East Coast to an icy standstill. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon)
Shawn Covelly knocks snow off his awning, Sunday, Jan. 24, 2016, in Towson, Md. Millions of Americans were preparing to dig themselves out Sunday after a mammoth blizzard with hurricane-force winds and record-setting snowfall brought much of the East Coast to an icy standstill. (AP Photo/Steve Ruark)
Johna McVey, of Falmouth, Mass., shovels out her car in front of her home Sunday, Jan. 24, 2015, in Falmouth. A massive winter storm buried much of the U.S. East Coast in a foot or more of snow Saturday. (AP Photo/Steven Senne)
A man makes his way through the snow, Saturday, Jan. 23, 2016 in the Georgetown area of Washington. A blizzard with hurricane-force winds brought much of the East Coast to a standstill Saturday, dumping as much as 3 feet of snow, stranding tens of thousands of travelers and shutting down the nation's capital and its largest city. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon)

A massive winter storm system pummeled the eastern United States in late January 2016, with two low-pressure systems merging into a potent nor’easter that dropped heavy snow from Virginia to New England. By late afternoon on Jan. 23, snowfall totals were approaching records in several states, and hurricane-force winds were battering the coastlines and leading to serious flooding. The storm was expected to continue through the morning of Jan. 24.

The Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) on the Suomi NPP satellite acquired this image of the storm system at 2:15 a.m. EST on Jan. 23. It was composed through the use of the VIIRS “day-night band,” which detects faint light signals such as city lights, moonlight, airglow, and auroras. In the image, the clouds are lit from above by the nearly full Moon and from below by the lights of the heavily populated East Coast. The city lights are blurred in places by cloud cover.

(Photo via NASA)

Harrison Feind of Boulder, Colo., takes a selfie with a snowman in front of the White House in Washington, Saturday, Jan. 23, 2016. A blizzard with hurricane-force winds brought much of the East Coast to a standstill Saturday, dumping as much as 3 feet of snow, stranding tens of thousands of travelers and shutting down the nation's capital and its largest city. (AP Photo/Manuel Balce Ceneta)
A man uses cross country skies as he goes down M Street NW in the snow, Saturday, Jan. 23, 2016 in the Georgetown area of Washington. A blizzard with hurricane-force winds brought much of the East Coast to a standstill Saturday, dumping as much as 3 feet of snow, stranding tens of thousands of travelers and shutting down the nation's capital and its largest city. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon)
Headstones are nearly covered by snow at Arlington National Cemetery, Saturday, Jan. 23, 2016 in Arlington, Va. A blizzard with hurricane-force winds brought much of the East Coast to a standstill Saturday, dumping as much as 3 feet of snow, stranding tens of thousands of travelers and shutting down the nation's capital and its largest city. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon)
NEW YORK, NY - JANUARY 23: A woman walks in strong winds and heavy snow fall in Central Park on January 23, 2016 in New York City. A major Nor'easter is hitting much of the East Coast and parts of the South as forecasts warn of up to two feet of snow in some areas. (Photo by Astrid Riecken/Getty Images)
A woman walks along Broad Street through a snowstorm, Saturday, Jan. 23, 2016, in Philadelphia. (AP Photo/Matt Slocum)
TOPSHOT - A man use a skiing on a snow covered street in Manhattan in New York on January 23, 2016. A deadly blizzard with bone-chilling winds and potentially record-breaking snowfall slammed the eastern US on January 23, as officials urged millions in the storm's path to seek shelter -- warning the worst is yet to come. US news reports said at least eight people had died by late Friday from causes related to the monster snowstorm, which is expected to last until early Sunday. / AFP / KENA BETANCUR (Photo credit should read KENA BETANCUR/AFP/Getty Images)
Bella Fraker, 10, of Atlanta, stands high on a snow pile as she poses for a family photo in New York's Times Square Saturday, Jan. 23, 2016, as a large winter storm rolls up the East Coast. Fraker was in New York for auditions. (AP Photo/Craig Ruttle)
TOPSHOT - A pedestrian walks in the center of a snow-covered residential street in Washington, DC on January 23, 2016. A deadly blizzard with bone-chilling winds and potentially record-breaking snowfall slammed the eastern US on January 23, as officials urged millions in the storm's path to seek shelter -- warning the worst is yet to come. / AFP / MANDEL NGAN (Photo credit should read MANDEL NGAN/AFP/Getty Images)
A woman pulls the hood of her coat over her head as she steps out into the snow in Lower Manhattan, Saturday, Jan. 23, 2016, in New York. Millions of Americans awoke to heavy snow outside their doorsteps as a mammoth winter storm crawled up the East Coast. (AP Photo/Julie Jacobson)
Pedestrians walk in New York, Saturday, Jan. 23, 2016. A massive winter storm buried much of the U.S. East Coast in a foot or more of snow by Saturday, shutting down transit in major cities, stranding drivers on snowbound highways, knocking out power to tens of thousands of people. (AP Photo/Craig Ruttle)
Gary Utley, 27, of Alexandria, snowboards behind a Jeep driven by his friend, as snow falls, in Alexandria, Va., Saturday, Jan. 23, 2016. A blizzard with hurricane-force winds brought much of the East Coast to a standstill Saturday, dumping as much as 3 feet of snow, stranding tens of thousands of travelers and shutting down the nation's capital and its largest city. (AP Photo/Cliff Owen)
Tyler Ridge, left, Evan Oakes, and Stephen Biggs, relax in a snow fort in the median of Monument Avenue in Richmond, Va., Saturday, Jan. 23, 2016. A massive winter storm buried much of the U.S. East Coast in a foot or more of snow by Saturday, shutting down transit in major cities, stranding drivers on snowbound highways, knocking out power to tens of thousands of people. (AP Photo/Steve Helber)
A van drives through a flooded street as ice and snow prevent drainage Saturday, Jan. 23, 2016, in Atlantic City, N.J. Most of the state was facing a blizzard warning from Friday evening until Sunday that called for up to 24 inches of snow, with the deepest accumulations in the central part of the state. (AP Photo/Mel Evans)
A person plows snow off a bridge at a ferry terminal during a snowstorm, Saturday, Jan. 23, 2016, in Jersey City, N.J. Towns across the state are hunkering down during a major snowstorm that hit overnight. (AP Photo/Julio Cortez)
A commuter walks into the Hoboken PATH train station during a snowstorm, Saturday, Jan. 23, 2016, in Hoboken, N.J. Towns across the state are hunkering down during the major snowstorm that hit overnight. (AP Photo/Julio Cortez)

January 22, 2016

Scott Kelly ‏(@StationCDRKelly): Massive #snowstorm blanketing #EastCoast clearly visible from @Space_Station! Stay safe! #blizzard2016 #YearInSpace

A motorist shovels snow to free up a vehicle on the New Jersey Turnpike during a snowstorm, Saturday, Jan. 23, 2016, in Port Reading, N.J. Towns across the state are hunkering down during a major snowstorm that hit overnight. (AP Photo/Julio Cortez)
TOPSHOT - A man lays in a pile of snow in Times Square on January 23, 2016 in New York. A deadly blizzard with bone-chilling winds and potentially record-breaking snowfall slammed the eastern US on January 23, as officials urged millions in the storm's path to seek shelter -- warning the worst is yet to come. US news reports said at least eight people had died by late Friday from causes related to the monster snowstorm, which is expected to last until early Sunday. / AFP / Don EMMERT (Photo credit should read DON EMMERT/AFP/Getty Images)
People walk on a snow-covered intersection during a snowstorm, Saturday, Jan. 23, 2016, in Jersey City, N.J. Towns across the state are hunkering down during a major snowstorm that hit overnight. (AP Photo/Julio Cortez)
CAPE MAY, NEW JERSEY - JANUARY 23: Waves crash on the beach on January 23, 2016 in Cape May, New Jersey. A major snowstorm is upon the East Coast this weekend with some areas expected to receive over a foot of snow. (Photo by Andrew Renneisen/Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC - JANUARY 22: Nuns from the Fraternite Notre-Dame in Chicago, Illinois are covered in newly fallen snow as they walk along Constitution Avenue while snow begins to accumulate January 22, 2016 in Washington, DC. A major snowstorm is forecasted for the East Coast this weekend with some areas expected to receive up to 1-2 feet of snow. (Photo by Win McNamee/Getty Images)
Christian Jimenez, 7, of Towson, Md., walks through snow to get to a convenience store in Towson, Saturday, Jan. 23, 2016. One in seven Americans will get at least half a foot of snow outside their homes when this weekend's big storm has finished delivering blizzards, gale-force winds, whiteout conditions and flooding to much of the eastern United States. (AP Photo/Steve Ruark)
Snow covers cars parked in Washington on January 23, 2016. A deadly blizzard with bone-chilling winds and potentially record-breaking snowfall slammed the eastern US on Saturday, as officials urged millions in the storm's path to seek shelter -- warning the worst is yet to come. US news reports said at least eight people had died by late Friday from causes related to the monster snowstorm, which is expected to last until early Sunday. / AFP / Mladen ANTONOV (Photo credit should read MLADEN ANTONOV/AFP/Getty Images)
Jessica Ourisman, a travel advisor from Baltimore, looks up at the buildings around the New York Stock Exchange while touring lower Manhattan with a group of other advisors during a snow storm, Saturday, Jan. 23, 2016, in New York. (AP Photo/Julie Jacobson)
Heavy snow falls in New York's Upper West Side, Saturday, Jan. 23, 2016, as a large winter storm rolls up the East Coast. (AP Photo/Craig Ruttle)
Dan Rafalin, left, lifts his daughter, Delila Rafalin, 5, while playing in heavy snowfall with their family on Independence Mall, Saturday, Jan. 23, 2016, in Philadelphia. (AP Photo/Matt Slocum)
TOPSHOT - A man pushing a snow plough during a snowstorm January 22, 2016 in New York. / AFP / FRANCOIS XAVIER MARIT (Photo credit should read FRANCOIS XAVIER MARIT/AFP/Getty Images)
A man walks on snow covered Thomas Circle in Washington on January 23, 2016. A deadly blizzard with bone-chilling winds and potentially record-breaking snowfall slammed the eastern US on Saturday, as officials urged millions in the storm's path to seek shelter -- warning the worst is yet to come. US news reports said at least eight people had died by late Friday from causes related to the monster snowstorm, which is expected to last until early Sunday. / AFP / Mladen ANTONOV (Photo credit should read MLADEN ANTONOV/AFP/Getty Images)
A girl shovels snow during a winter storm, Saturday, Jan. 23, 2016, in Philadelphia. (AP Photo/Matt Slocum)
WASHINGTON, DC - JANUARY 22: A snowplow cleans up snow on Pennsylvania Avenue in front of the U.S. Capitol January 22, 2016 in Washington, DC. A winter snowstorm is forecasted for the East Coast this weekend with prediction of up to 30 inches of snow for the DC area. (Photo by Alex Wong/Getty Images)
TOPSHOT - The White House is seen during a snowstorm in Washington January 22, 2016. Thousands of flights were cancelled and supermarket shelves were left bare Friday as millions of Americans hunkered down for a winter storm expected to dump historic amounts of snow in the eastern United States. / AFP / Brendan Smialowski (Photo credit should read BRENDAN SMIALOWSKI/AFP/Getty Images)
A grocery store employee collects shopping carts from a parking lot during a snowstorm, Saturday, Jan. 23, 2016, in Jersey City, N.J. Towns across the state are hunkering down during the major snowstorm that hit overnight. (AP Photo/Julio Cortez)
A boy crashes while sledding down the steps of the Philadelphia Museum of Art during a snowstorm, Saturday, Jan. 23, 2016, in Philadelphia. (AP Photo/Matt Slocum)
Sean Jackson and Gina Del Tatto push their child, Hayes Jackson, in a stroller as heavy snow falls in New York's Upper West Side, Saturday, Jan. 23, 2016, as a large winter storm rolls up the East Coast. (AP Photo/Craig Ruttle)
A man walks by Federal Hall National Memorial during a snow storm, Saturday, Jan. 23, 2016, in New York. Millions of Americans awoke to heavy snow outside their doorsteps as a mammoth winter storm crawled up the East Coast. (AP Photo/Julie Jacobson)
Michelle Navarre Cleary pulls a bag as she walks on K Street in Washington on Saturday, Jan. 23, 2016, as snow continues to fall. With long lead time from forecasters and stern warnings from authorities, tens of millions of residents from northern Georgia to New Jersey shuttered themselves inside to wait out a mammoth storm that made travel treacherous and could dump 2 feet or more of snow in some areas. (AP Photo/Jon Elswick)
A masked man walks on King Street as snow falls in Alexandria, Va., Saturday, Jan. 23, 2016. A blizzard with hurricane-force winds brought much of the East Coast to a standstill Saturday, dumping as much as 3 feet of snow, stranding tens of thousands of travelers and shutting down the nation's capital and its largest city. (AP Photo/Cliff Owen)
A tractor trailer rig drives during a snowstorm along the Atlantic City Expressway, Friday, Jan. 22, 2016, near Atlantic City. Most of the state was facing a blizzard warning from Friday evening until Sunday that called for up to 24 inches of snow, with the deepest accumulations in the central part of the state. (AP Photo/Mel Evans)
TOPSHOT - People cross 15ht Street during a snowstorm in Washington January 22, 2016. Thousands of flights were cancelled and supermarket shelves were left bare Friday as millions of Americans hunkered down for a winter storm expected to dump historic amounts of snow in the eastern United States. / AFP / Brendan Smialowski (Photo credit should read BRENDAN SMIALOWSKI/AFP/Getty Images)
A vehicle crosses a snow-covered road near the Holland Tunnel during a snowstorm, Saturday, Jan. 23, 2016, in Jersey City, N.J. Towns across the state are hunkering down during a major snowstorm that hit overnight. (AP Photo/Julio Cortez)
Coastal flooding from a winter snowstorm inundates houses along W. 7th Avenue, Saturday, Jan. 23, 2016, in North Wildwood, N.J. (AP Photo/Robb Nunzio)
A Homeless covers from the snow in Central park on January 23, 2016 in New York. A deadly blizzard with bone-chilling winds and potentially record-breaking snowfall slammed the eastern US on Saturday, as officials urged millions in the storm's path to seek shelter -- warning the worst is yet to come. US news reports said at least eight people had died by late Friday from causes related to the monster snowstorm, which is expected to last until early Sunday. / AFP / KENA BETANCUR (Photo credit should read KENA BETANCUR/AFP/Getty Images)
A man walks past a restaurant during a snowstorm January 22, 2016 in Washington, DC. Thousands of flights were cancelled and supermarket shelves were left bare Friday as millions of Americans hunkered down for a winter storm expected to dump historic amounts of snow in the eastern United States. / AFP / Brendan Smialowski (Photo credit should read BRENDAN SMIALOWSKI/AFP/Getty Images)
A person walks on a snow-covered path at Pier A Park during a snowstorm, Saturday, Jan. 23, 2016, in Hoboken, N.J. Towns across the state are hunkering down during a major snowstorm that hit overnight. (AP Photo/Julio Cortez)
CHAPEL HILL, NC - JANUARY 22: Vehicles move along Interstate 40 as an overhead sign indicates 'Winter Weather Warning In Effect' during a winter storm on January 22, 2016 in Chapel Hill, North Carolina. A major snowstorm is forecasted for the East Coast this weekend with some areas getting a possible one to two feet of snow. (Photo by Lance King/Getty Images)
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STORM DEATHS

More than two dozen weather-related deaths — from car crashes, shoveling snow and carbon monoxide — were reported by authorities.

Among the dead were a 23-year-old New Jersey woman and her 1-year-old son, who died of carbon monoxide poisoning after snow covered the tailpipe of their car. Passaic police said the woman's 3-year-old daughter was also hospitalized.

A 44-year-old U.S. Capitol Police officer died of a heart attack after shoveling snow in front of his Delaware home on Saturday afternoon.

In Kentucky, a transportation worker died Saturday while plowing snow-covered highways. His plow slid into a ditch.

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THE DAMAGE

The blizzard's heavy snow, powerful winds and churning high tides collapsed roofs and inundated homes.

A Pennsylvania church held a cyber-only service on Sunday after its roof collapsed in the storm. Pastor Lee Wiggins says it will take about six months to repair the $1 million in damages sustained by Calvary Fellowship Church in Downingtown.

A historic theater in Virginia billed as "Home of Virginia's Lil' Ole Opry" was a total loss after its roof collapsed on Friday. The Donk's Theater opened in 1947 as a movie house near the Chesapeake Bay and was resurrected as a country music venue after closing in the 70s.

A Maryland farmer who thought he was protecting his cows from the elements by moving them inside lost part of his herd when the structure's roof gave way. Douglas Fink said he and his wife were getting ready to go inside the barn to feed the cows when the roof buckled.

Along the mid-Atlantic coast, water swept into some communities in New Jersey and Delaware. Restaurants along the Jersey shore were partially submerged by flood waters on Saturday -- one business owner said the water was waist-deep. In Delaware, about a dozen people to be evacuated from the low-lying community of Oak Orchard.

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GETTING AROUND

Airports began returning to normal on Sunday, and airlines intended to resume service at all Eastern airports by Monday. However, 80 flights have been cancelled for then. Travel bans that restricted non-emergency vehicles from streets all across the region were lifted, but mass transit services faced hurdles.

In New York, trains started running out of Grand Central Terminal but service on the Long Island Rail Road — the nation's busiest commuter rail service — was still suspended.

Officials for both LIRR and the Metropolitan Transportation Authority said almost all mass transit services will be running in time for the morning rush hour.

In Washington, partial rail and bus service would resume Monday -- for free -- at 7 a.m., officials said.

In Philadelphia, where subways ran through the storm, transit officials began restoring bus and trolley services but most commuter trains were canceled Sunday. Officials said they expected those trains to be operating with delays on Monday morning.

Amtrak operated some trains through the busy Northeast Corridor on Sunday and said they will continue operating a modified schedule on Monday.

And traffic was moving again on highways that were shut down by the storm -- including those in Kentucky and Pennsylvania where motorists were stranded overnight.

PHOTOS: D.C. celebrates the historic snowstorm with a massive snowball fight

19 PHOTOS
D.C. celebrates historic snowstorm with a massive snowball fight
See Gallery
Things to know about the massive weekend blizzard
A man dressed as Captain America uses his shield to deflect a snowball during the DC Snowball Fight on Dupont Circle in Washington on January 24, 2016. Snowball fights have become a tradition after every major snow storm in the Nation's Capital. A massive blizzard that claimed at least 16 lives in the eastern United States finally appeared to be winding down Sunday, giving snowbound residents the chance to begin digging out. / AFP / Nicholas Kamm (Photo credit should read NICHOLAS KAMM/AFP/Getty Images)
A man reacts after being hit with a snowball during an organized snowball fight at Dupont Circle Sunday, Jan. 24, 2016 in Washington. People throw snow during an organized snowball fight at Dupont Circle Sunday, Jan. 24, 2016 in Washington. Millions of Americans were preparing to dig themselves out Sunday after a mammoth blizzard with hurricane-force winds and record-setting snowfall brought much of the East Coast to an icy standstill. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon)
A man runs away covered in snow during an organized snowball fight at Dupont Circle Sunday, Jan. 24, 2016 in Washington. People throw snow during an organized snowball fight at Dupont Circle Sunday, Jan. 24, 2016 in Washington. Millions of Americans were preparing to dig themselves out Sunday after a mammoth blizzard with hurricane-force winds and record-setting snowfall brought much of the East Coast to an icy standstill. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon)
Young ladies wear animal onesie pajamas during an organized snowball fight at Dupont Circle Sunday, Jan. 24, 2016 in Washington. People throw snow during an organized snowball fight at Dupont Circle Sunday, Jan. 24, 2016 in Washington. Millions of Americans were preparing to dig themselves out Sunday after a mammoth blizzard with hurricane-force winds and record-setting snowfall brought much of the East Coast to an icy standstill. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon)
People participate in a giant snowball fight in Dupont Circle in Washington on January 24, 2016. Snowball fights have become a tradition after every major snow storm in the Nation's Capital. A massive blizzard that claimed at least 16 lives in the eastern United States finally appeared to be winding down Sunday, giving snowbound residents the chance to begin digging out. / AFP / Olivier Douliery (Photo credit should read OLIVIER DOULIERY/AFP/Getty Images)
People using a cardboard box as protection get hit by a snowball during the DC Snowball Fight on Dupont Circle in Washington on January 24, 2016. Snowball fights have become a tradition after every major snow storm in the Nation's Capital. A massive blizzard that claimed at least 16 lives in the eastern United States finally appeared to be winding down Sunday, giving snowbound residents the chance to begin digging out. / AFP / Nicholas Kamm (Photo credit should read NICHOLAS KAMM/AFP/Getty Images)
People take part in the DC Snowball Fight on Dupont Circle in Washington on January 24, 2016. Snowball fights have become a tradition after every major snow storm in the Nation's Capital. A massive blizzard that claimed at least 16 lives in the eastern United States finally appeared to be winding down Sunday, giving snowbound residents the chance to begin digging out. / AFP / Nicholas Kamm (Photo credit should read NICHOLAS KAMM/AFP/Getty Images)
TOPSHOT - People participate in a giant snowball fight in Dupont Circle in Washington on January 24, 2016. Snowball fights have become a tradition after every major snow storm in the Nation's Capital. A massive blizzard that claimed at least 16 lives in the eastern United States finally appeared to be winding down Sunday, giving snowbound residents the chance to begin digging out. / AFP / Olivier Douliery (Photo credit should read OLIVIER DOULIERY/AFP/Getty Images)
A man tosses a snowball while wearing a full helmet and GoPro, during an organized snowball fight at Dupont Circle Sunday, Jan. 24, 2016 in Washington. People throw snow during an organized snowball fight at Dupont Circle Sunday, Jan. 24, 2016 in Washington. Millions of Americans were preparing to dig themselves out Sunday after a mammoth blizzard with hurricane-force winds and record-setting snowfall brought much of the East Coast to an icy standstill. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon)
People participate in a giant snowball fight in Dupont Circle in Washington on January 24, 2016. Snowball fights have become a tradition after every major snow storm in the Nation's Capital. A massive blizzard that claimed at least 16 lives in the eastern United States finally appeared to be winding down Sunday, giving snowbound residents the chance to begin digging out. / AFP / Olivier Douliery (Photo credit should read OLIVIER DOULIERY/AFP/Getty Images)
People participate in a giant snowball fight in Dupont Circle in Washington on January 24, 2016. Snowball fights have become a tradition after every major snow storm in the Nation's Capital. A massive blizzard that claimed at least 16 lives in the eastern United States finally appeared to be winding down Sunday, giving snowbound residents the chance to begin digging out. / AFP / Olivier Douliery (Photo credit should read OLIVIER DOULIERY/AFP/Getty Images)
A person holds an American Flag during a charge during an organized snowball fight at Dupont Circle Sunday, Jan. 24, 2016 in Washington. Millions of Americans were preparing to dig themselves out Sunday after a mammoth blizzard with hurricane-force winds and record-setting snowfall brought much of the East Coast to an icy standstill. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon)
People participate in a giant snowball fight in Dupont Circle in Washington on January 24, 2016. Snowball fights have become a tradition after every major snow storm in the Nation's Capital. A massive blizzard that claimed at least 16 lives in the eastern United States finally appeared to be winding down Sunday, giving snowbound residents the chance to begin digging out. / AFP / Olivier Douliery (Photo credit should read OLIVIER DOULIERY/AFP/Getty Images)
People take part in the DC Snowball Fight on Dupont Circle in Washington on January 24, 2016. Snowball fights have become a tradition after every major snow storm in the Nation's Capital. A massive blizzard that claimed at least 16 lives in the eastern United States finally appeared to be winding down Sunday, giving snowbound residents the chance to begin digging out. / AFP / Nicholas Kamm (Photo credit should read NICHOLAS KAMM/AFP/Getty Images)
People participate in a giant snowball fight in Dupont Circle in Washington on January 24, 2016. Snowball fights have become a tradition after every major snow storm in the Nation's Capital. A massive blizzard that claimed at least 16 lives in the eastern United States finally appeared to be winding down Sunday, giving snowbound residents the chance to begin digging out. / AFP / Olivier Douliery (Photo credit should read OLIVIER DOULIERY/AFP/Getty Images)
People throw snow during an organized snowball fight at Dupont Circle Sunday, Jan. 24, 2016 in Washington. Millions of Americans were preparing to dig themselves out Sunday after a mammoth blizzard with hurricane-force winds and record-setting snowfall brought much of the East Coast to an icy standstill. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon)
A man dressed as a Jedi knight takes part in the DC Snowball Fight in Washington on January 24, 2016. Snowball fights have become a tradition after every major snow storm in the Nation's Capital. A massive blizzard that claimed at least 16 lives in the eastern United States finally appeared to be winding down Sunday, giving snowbound residents the chance to begin digging out. / AFP / Nicholas Kamm (Photo credit should read NICHOLAS KAMM/AFP/Getty Images)
A boy throws a snowball at a man dressed as Captain America during the DC Snowball Fight on Dupont Circle in Washington on January 24, 2016. Snowball fights have become a tradition after every major snow storm in the Nation's Capital. A massive blizzard that claimed at least 16 lives in the eastern United States finally appeared to be winding down Sunday, giving snowbound residents the chance to begin digging out. / AFP / Nicholas Kamm (Photo credit should read NICHOLAS KAMM/AFP/Getty Images)
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SCHOOL'S OUT FOR WINTER

Many schools canceled classes for Monday, despite the fortuitous weekend timing of the storm. District of Columbia Public School officials said schools would close Monday, as did Baltimore City Schools and the School District of Philadelphia.

Other students were not so lucky: New York City's nearly 1 million public school students still have classes Monday, despite the record snowfall.

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