Experts warn that the US is underestimating a greater jihadist threat than ISIS

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Al Qaeda Branch in Syria Hits Rebels, Pushes Propaganda

A joint report between two Washington, DC-based think tanks concludes that the US is dangerously underestimating a jihadist group that could prove to be even more of a threat to the long-term security of the country than ISIS.

The Institute for the Study of War and the American Enterprise Institute released their report last week. It was the result of a multi-week planning group of experts, some of whom were involved in constructing the 2007 surge of US troops in Iraq.

The report stated that the Syrian Al-Qaeda affiliate, Jabhat al-Nusra, "poses one of the most significant long-term threats" of any jihadist group.

"This Al Qaeda affiliate has established an expansive network of partnerships with local opposition groups that have grown either dependent on or fiercely loyal to the organization," the report said. "Its defeat and destruction must be one of the highest priorities of any strategy to defend the United States and Europe from Al Qaeda attacks."

While the current US strategy in the Middle East is heavily focused on ISIS (also known as the Islamic State, ISIL, or Daesh), Jabhat al-Nusra (also known as the Nusra Front) is spreading its influence through groups that oppose the regime of Syrian President Bashar al-Assad.

Fighters with whom the US partners in Syria have previously been told that they must focus on combating ISIS and refrain from attack Assad's troops. But ISW and AEI pointed out that deposing Assad, a brutal leader who has been accused of massacring his own citizens, is the top priority for many rebels.

In that case, they'll align with the most well-equipped and well-funded groups that give them the freedom to fight both ISIS and Assad. In many areas, that group is Jabhat al-Nusra.

"Jabhat al-Nusra has weakened the moderate opposition and penetrated other Sunni opposition groups in Syria so thoroughly that it is poised to benefit the most from the destruction of ISIS and the fall or transition of the Assad regime," the report said.

"The likeliest outcome of the current strategy in Syria, if it succeeds, is the de facto establishment and ultimate declaration of a Jabhat al-Nusra emirate in Syria that has the backing of a wide range of non-al-Qaeda fighting forces and population groups," it continued.

ISW and AEI predicted that Jabhat al-Nusra could then become a key affiliate for the global Al-Qaeda terror network that focuses on attacking the West.

So far, it appears that Jabhat al-Nusra has been mostly focused on fighting inside of Syria. But that could be a part of a strategy to avoid scrutiny from Western officials.

More on the group:

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Experts warn that the US is underestimating a greater jihadist threat than ISIS
FILE- In this picture take on Friday, March. 1, 2013, anti-Syrian President Bashar Assad protesters hold the Jabhat al-Nusra flag, as they shout slogans during a demonstration, at Kafranbel town, in Idlib province, northern Syria. he head of the al-Qaida-linked group fighting to topple Syrian President Bashar Assad was once a teacher of classical Arabic who joined the insurgency after he moved to Iraq, regional intelligence officials say. State media reported the Jabhat al-Nusra, or Nusra Front leader, was killed last week, but rebels deny that, saying it was propaganda. His whereabouts are kept so secretive that no one seems to be able to say with certainty whether he is alive or dead or where he is based. But his resume, as outlined by the officials, shows him rising through al-Qaidaâs ranks in Iraq before moving to Syria shortly after the uprising against Assad began in March 2011. (AP Photo/Hussein Malla, File)
FILE - In this Saturday, March 17, 2012 file photo, Syrian security officers gather in front the damaged building of the aviation intelligence department, which was attacked by one of two explosions in Damascus, Syria. A new al-Qaida-style group claimed Wednesday, March 21, 2012 that it carried out the double suicide bombing that killed dozens. Foreign Islamic militants fighting Syria's regime pose a dilemma for the country's rebels, and nothing typifies the problem more than Jabhat al-Nusra, a shadowy group of veterans of jihad in Iraq, Libya and elsewhere. Some rebels worry the group is too radical, using al-Qaida-style tactics of suicide bombings. (AP Photo/Bassem Tellawi, File)
ALEPPO, SY - FEBRUARY 13: Yahea Ateq, a fighter in the Islamist Jabhat al-Nusra faction, was a stone mason before joining the civil war and returned to the fight just days after suffering three bullet wounds that stopped just short of his heart. (Paul Watson/Toronto Star via Getty Images)
A wall in the Syrian city of Raqqa reads: 'Stay away, this property belongs to Muslims. (Signed) Jabhat al Nusra.' Jabhat al Nusra, a group calling for the establishment of an Islamic state in Syria, has recently clashed with rebel groups that espouse a more moderate interpretation of Islam. (David Enders/MCT via Getty Images)
Jabhat al Nusra, a radical Islamist group linked to Al Qaida, controls the gas production plant and other key components in the economy of Ash Shaddadi, eastern Syria, rendering -- it in the eyes of the United States and its Mideast allies -- a potentially a self-sustaining self-declared terror entity. (Andree Kaiser/MCT via Getty Images)
Jabhat al Nusra, a radical Islamist group linked to Al Qaida, controls the gas production plant and other key components in the economy of Ash Shaddadi, eastern Syria, rendering -- it in the eyes of the United States and its Mideast allies -- a potentially a self-sustaining self-declared terror entity. (Andree Kaiser/MCT via Getty Images)
Syrian Kurds mourn over a picture of a relative as his body is transported from a hospital before the burial on August 27, 2013 of three Kurdish militia fighters from the Committees for the Protection of the Kurdish People (YPG) who were reportedly killed in an attack on their checkpoint by militants from the radical Islamist group Jabhat Al-Nusra in the Kurdish town of Derik, known in Arabic as al-Malikiyah, in Syria's northeastern Hasakeh governorate, on the border with Turkey and Iraq. A new wave of Syrians began pouring into northern Iraq in mid-August, seeking refuge from fighting between Kurdish forces and Islamist rebels, as well as from an economy in tatters. Syria's Kurds, who number over two million and are concentrated in the north and northeast of the country. AFP PHOTO/BENJAMIN HILLER (Photo credit should read BENJAMIN HILLER/AFP/Getty Images)
Jabhat al Nusra, a radical Islamist group linked to Al Qaida, controls the gas production plant and other key components in the economy of Ash Shaddadi, eastern Syria, rendering -- it in the eyes of the United States and its Mideast allies -- a potentially a self-sustaining self-declared terror entity. (Andree Kaiser/MCT via Getty Images)
Jabhat al Nusra, a radical Islamist group linked to Al Qaida, controls the gas production plant and other key components in the economy of Ash Shaddadi, eastern Syria, rendering -- it in the eyes of the United States and its Mideast allies -- a potentially a self-sustaining self-declared terror entity. (Andree Kaiser/MCT via Getty Images)
Jabhat al Nusra, a radical Islamist group linked to Al Qaida, controls the gas production plant and other key components in the economy of Ash Shaddadi, eastern Syria, rendering -- it in the eyes of the United States and its Mideast allies -- a potentially a self-sustaining self-declared terror entity. (Andree Kaiser/MCT via Getty Images)
FILE - In this Friday, Jan. 11, 2013 file citizen journalism image provided by Edlib News Network, ENN, which has been authenticated based on its contents and other AP reporting, rebels from al-Qaida-affiliated Jabhat al-Nusra, also known as the Nusra Front, wave their brigade flag, as they step on the top of a Syrian air force helicopter at Taftanaz air base that was captured by the rebels in Idlib province, northern Syria. The Nusra Front, Syria's al-Qaida affiliate, is consolidating power in territory stretching from the Turkish border to central and southern Syria, crushing moderate opponents and forcibly converting minorities using tactics akin to its ultraconservative rival, the Islamic State group. (AP Photo/Edlib News Network ENN, File)
FILE - In this Friday, Jan. 11, 2013 file photo, citizen journalism image provided by an anti-Bashar Assad activist group Edlib News Network (ENN), which has been authenticated based on its contents and other AP reporting, rebels from al-Qaida-affiliated Jabhat al-Nusra, also known as the Nusra Front, sit on a truck full of ammunition at Taftanaz air base, that was captured by the rebels in Idlib province, northern Syria. The Nusra Front, Syria's al-Qaida affiliate, is consolidating power in territory stretching from the Turkish border to central and southern Syria, crushing moderate opponents and forcibly converting minorities using tactics akin to its ultraconservative rival, the Islamic State group. (AP Photo/Edlib News Network ENN, File)
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"The fact that the US is focused so exclusively on ISIS means that we are ignoring a threat that is as great," Kimberly Kagan, the founder and president of ISW and one of the authors of the report, told Business Insider.

Jabhat al-Nusra is playing a "long-game," Kagan said.

"ISIS is in fact overt about its presence and Nusra is covert about its presence. Nusra's covert presence means the US hasn't focused enough on its presence," she said.

She added: "Al-Qaeda's senior leaders have had a deliberate strategy of where they host cells that are planning deliberate attacks against the West at any given moment. Because the US has deliberately targeted Al Qaeda on the basis of whether or not there are attack cells focused on the West, Al Qaeda has tried to minimize the footprint of these cells in areas where it actually wishes to see long-term success. Syria is the top priority for Al Qaeda."

Other experts, however, have characterized the potential threat from Jabhat al-Nusra in less dire terms.

Fred Hof, a senior fellow at the Atlantic Council and former special adviser for transition in Syria under then-Secretary of State Hillary Clinton, agreed that Nusra's resources have attracted many anti-Assad rebels to the group's ranks. But he contended that these fighters aren't very interested in broader operations.

"Absent a specific focus on fighting the Assad regime I think it will be difficult for the Nusra Front to exist in any meaningful way in Syria, thereby making it difficult for the group to use Syria as a launching pad for global operations," Hof told Business Insider.

Hof also pointed out that the US could potentially lure these Nusra recruits back to moderate opposition groups if the moderate groups had resources comparable to Nusra's.

Still, Kagan warns that groups like Nusra the intent to attack the West in the future "whether they're actioning that intent right now or not."

"US policymakers are underestimating Jabhat al-Nusra because Jabhat al-Nusra wishes to be underestimated," Kagan said. "... We are so focused on ISIS that we are not looking at the second threat."

And defeating ISIS could unintentionally strengthen Nusra.

Both ISIS and Nusra are Sunni terrorist groups. ISIS has presented itself as a group that can protect Sunnis against the Assad regime, which is aligned with Shiites. Once ISIS is gone, Nusra could step in and assume that role.

"Defeating ISIS inside of Syria is likely to increase the capability and strength of Jabhat al-Nusra," Kagan said. "It's waiting in the wings for ISIS' demise in order to establish itself more firmly in key terrain and to present itself as the only reliable ally for the Sunni population."

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