The best way to de-fuzz your winter knits

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By Alterations Needed

A few years ago, I picked up a few honeycomb sweaters from J.Crew. Then I proceeded to shrink them. All was fine and dandy until a few more washings later when these crazy things began to shed...bad. I blame that stupid angora. Pulling these things over my head begins a day long battle of wiping little fuzzies off my face, out of my eyes, and out of my mouth; not to mention what they do to anything worn layered over or underneath. Click through the slideshow to learn more about two solutions and see which one is better below!

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Defuzzing Sweaters
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The best way to de-fuzz your winter knits

Click through the slideshow to learn more about the best way to de-fuzz your sweaters

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Sweater Stone
Amazon, ~$8

A sweater stone is basically a chunk of porous pumice stone (volcanic rock) that catches and pulls loose fibers from your knits. It’s chunky and a bit unwieldy, so I wouldn’t recommend it for very delicate or very loose knits. However, it’s these very properties that made it good for this heavy duty job I had in mind.

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How to use

I found the sweater stone effective with quick, short, downward strokes, while holding the sweater taught with my other hand. Little balls of fuzz will quickly gather on the stone, which are easy to remove.

(Photo: Alterations Needed)

Sweater Comb
Amazon, ~$7

A sweater comb is a comb of wire mesh that is roughly textured in order to catch loose fibers from knits. The scratchy surface area is smaller than that of the sweater stone, so will take a bit longer to de-fuzz an entire knit. Handling the sweater comb felt more precise, so I’d prefer this when dealing with more delicate knits.

(Photo: Alterations Needed)

How to Use

Just like with the sweater stone, I found the sweater comb effective with quick, short, downward strokes, while holding the sweater taught with my other hand. Little balls of fuzz will clog up the wire mesh, and needs to be cleaned often.

(Photo: Alterations Needed)

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Sweater Stone Findings

Pros:
1)The large size makes a quicker job of de-fuzzing a knit.
2) The porous nature of the stone does a good job catching loose hairs and fuzz.

Cons:
1) Messy! Dust from the stone sheds as it's stroked across a knit, leaving a bunch of tiny black sand-like particles behind.
2) Feels a little heavy duty. I'd be super careful using this on loose or delicate knits.

Sweater Comb Findings

Pros
:
1) The small size makes a more careful and precise job of de-fuzzing a knit.
2) The wire mesh does a good job catching loose hairs and fuzz.

Cons:
1) The small de-fuzzing surface area gets clogged quickly, so it takes longer to cover an entire knit due to having to clean it so often.

Final Results
I found myself preferring the sweater stone for this particular job just due to it's sheer size. The larger surface area made a quicker job of getting through the entire sweater. What I finally ended up doing was going over an area with the sweater stone first, and then going over the same area quickly again with the sweater comb. As for which I prefer...I'd say it depends on the job. Heavy duty de-fuzzing jobs on tight, heavy knits may be better with the sweater stone (as long you don't mind the messy sandy bits it leaves behind). Lighter jobs and delicate knits are probably best off with the sweater comb.

See the full post here.

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