The unusual items that Donald Trump, Mark Cuban, and 11 other successful people have in their offices

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We all have our idiosyncrasies and bizarre routines that keep us sane. Certain objects and rituals add comfort to our lives — they make us feel at home.

A comfortable work space is an incredibly important factor when it comes to being productive.

Check out how these successful people have made their offices their own with a variety of unusual, yet meaningful, items.

LeBron James likes to keep Bruce Wayne close by.

The NBA legend keeps a replica batman mask in his pristine LRMR Marketing firm office in Akron, Ohio, according to ESPN.

SNL producer Lorne Michaels has a present from Reese Witherspoon in his office.

Vanity Fair reported that the creator and producer of Saturday Night Live keeps a dog-head inkwell that actress Reese Witherspoon gifted him.

The comedian also has a bobblehead of his favorite New York Yankee player, Paul O'Neill.

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American businessman and presidential candidate Donald Trump has one of Shaquille O'Neal's sneakers.

During a tour of his office in Trump Tower above Central Park, Donald Trump showed the Wall Street Journal's Monica Langley one of his prized memorabilia: a shoe that Shaquille O'Neal took off after a game and gave to him. "This is some serious foot," he said of the sizable sneaker.

Creator of 'Mad Men,' Matthew Weiner, keeps a Tibetan prayer horn on his desk.

The creator and executive producer of the drama television show "Mad Men," which ran from 2007 through 2015, keeps a bust of Ludwig van Beethoven and a Tibetan prayer horn on his desk, according to the Vanity Fair series, "My Desk."

Mark Cuban has a 9-year-old homemade poster board from his kids.

The billionaire Shark Tank investor gave People Magazine a tour of his home office in Dallas, Texas. One of the highlights included a handmade "Welcome Home Daddy" sign that he was greeted with upon returning from the hospital after having his hip replaced in 2007.

Also, his desk chair wears a Mavericks No. 1 jersey like a mannequin. The NBA team gifted Cuban the jersey the day he bought the franchise in January 2000.

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The unusual items that Donald Trump, Mark Cuban, and 11 other successful people have in their offices
Dallas Mavericks owner Mark Cuban stands behind the Dallas bench in the opening minutes against the New York Knicks during their NBA game February 24, 2014 at Madison Square Garden in New York. The Mavericks won, 110-108. AFP PHOTO/Stan HONDA (Photo credit should read STAN HONDA/AFP/Getty Images)
PHOENIX, AZ - JANUARY 17: Owner Mark Cuban of the Dallas Mavericks looks on during the NBA game against the Phoenix Suns at US Airways Center on January 17, 2014 in Phoenix, Arizona. The Mavericks defeated the Suns 110-107. NOTE TO USER: User expressly acknowledges and agrees that, by downloading and or using this photograph, User is consenting to the terms and conditions of the Getty Images License Agreement. (Photo by Christian Petersen/Getty Images)
Dallas Mavericks NBA basketball team owner and business man Mark Cuban walks with his legal team to the federal courthouse after a break in his inside trading trial in Dallas, Wednesday, Oct. 16, 2013. Jurors in the federal government's insider-trading lawsuit against the billionaire began deliberating Wednesday in federal district court following a trial that spanned three weeks. (AP Photo/LM Otero)
Mark Cuban, Dallas Mavericks NBA basketball team owner and business man, speaks to the media outside the federal courthouse after a verdict in his inside trading trial in Dallas, Wednesday, Oct. 16, 2013. Jurors said that billionaire Mark Cuban did not commit insider-trading when he sold his shares in an Internet company in 2004 after learning of a development that would dilute the value of his investment. The jury in federal court found that the SEC failed to prove several key elements of its case, including that Cuban traded on nonpublic information. (AP Photo/LM Otero)
Billionaire Dallas Mavericks NBA basketball team owner Mark Cuban, center, walks with his legal team to the federal courthouse after a break in his insider trading trial in Dallas, Wednesday, Oct. 16, 2013. Jurors say billionaire Mark Cuban did not commit insider-trading when he sold his shares in an Internet company in 2004 after learning of a development that would dilute the value of his investment. The jury in federal court found that the SEC failed to prove several key elements of its case, including that Cuban traded on nonpublic information. (AP Photo/LM Otero)
Mark Cuban, billionaire owner of the Dallas Mavericks basketball team, speaks with members of the media as he exits federal court in Dallas, Texas, U.S., on Thursday, Oct. 3, 2013. Cuban said he doesn't recall details of a conversation in which he was allegedly warned that information he received about a company was confidential. Photographer: Mike Fuentes/Bloomberg via Getty Images
Mark Cuban, owner of the Dallas Mavericks basketball team, left, exits federal court in Dallas, Texas, U.S., on Monday, Sept. 30, 2013. Cuban goes to trial over regulators' claims he engaged in insider trading when he sold his stake in a Canadian Internet search company nine years ago. Photographer: Ben Torres/Bloomberg via Getty Images
LOS ANGELES, CA - NOVEMBER 24: TV personality Mark Cuban attends the 2013 American Music Awards Powered by Dodge at Nokia Theatre L.A. Live on November 24, 2013 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Charley Gallay/AMA2013/Getty Images for Dodge)
The Los Angeles Lakers' Kobe Bryant (24) is hugged Dallas Mavericks owner Mark Cuban after the Mavs' 90-82 win at the American Airlines Center in Dallas on Friday, Nov. 13, 2015. (Paul Moseley/Fort Worth Star-Telegram/TNS via Getty Images)
PHILADELPHIA,PA - NOVEMBER 16: Owner of the Dallas Mavericks Mark Cuban looks on against the Philadelphia 76ers at Wells Fargo Center on November 16, 2015 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania NOTE TO USER: User expressly acknowledges and agrees that, by downloading and/or using this Photograph, user is consenting to the terms and conditions of the Getty Images License Agreement. Mandatory Copyright Notice: Copyright 2015 NBAE (Photo by Jesse D. Garrabrant/NBAE via Getty Images)
PHILADELPHIA, PA - NOVEMBER 16: Mark Cuban, owner of the Dallas Mavericks, looks on prior to the game against the Philadelphia 76ers on November 16, 2015 at the Wells Fargo Center in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. NOTE TO USER: User expressly acknowledges and agrees that, by downloading and or using this photograph, User is consenting to the terms and conditions of the Getty Images License Agreement. (Photo by Mitchell Leff/Getty Images)
LOS ANGELES CA - OCTOBER 29: Mark Cuban, owner of the Dallas Mavericks, follows the action from behind the bench during the third quarter of the basketball game against Los Angeles Clippers at Staples Center October 29, 2015, in Los Angeles California. NOTE TO USER: User expressly acknowledges and agrees that, by downloading and or using this photograph, User is consenting to the terms and conditions of the Getty Images License Agreement. (Photo by Kevork Djansezian/Getty Images)
Mark Cuban, Investor, Entrepreneur and Owner, Dallas Mavericks, offers his critique to finalists at the Global Startup Showcase, as one of four judges at 2015 WSJD Live on October 20, 2015 in Laguna Beach, California. WSJ D Live brings together top CEOs, founders, pioneers, investors and luminaries to explore the most exciting tech opportunities emerging around the world. AFP PHOTO / FREDERIC J. BROWN (Photo credit should read FREDERIC J. BROWN/AFP/Getty Images)
Mark Cuban, billionaire owner of the National Basketball Association's (NBA) Dallas Mavericks basketball team, left, and his wife Tiffany Cuban arrive at a state dinner in honor of Chinese President Xi Jinping at the White House in Washington, D.C., U.S., on Friday, Sept. 25, 2015. The U.S. and China announced agreement on broad anti-hacking principles aimed at stopping the theft of corporate trade secrets though President Barack Obama pointedly said he has not ruled out invoking sanctions for violators. Photographer: Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images
Mark Cuban, billionaire owner of the National Basketball Association's (NBA) Dallas Mavericks basketball team, left, and his wife Tiffany Cuban arrive at a state dinner in honor of Chinese President Xi Jinping at the White House in Washington, D.C., U.S., on Friday, Sept. 25, 2015. The U.S. and China announced agreement on broad anti-hacking principles aimed at stopping the theft of corporate trade secrets though President Barack Obama pointedly said he has not ruled out invoking sanctions for violators. Photographer: Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images
SHARK TANK - Lori Greiner, Mark Cuban, Daymond John, Barbara Corcoran, Robert Herjavec and Kevin O'Leary is a 'Shark' on ABC's 'Shark Tank.' (Photo by Bob D'Amico/ABC via Getty Images)
SHARK TANK - Mark Cuban is a 'Shark' on ABC's 'Shark Tank.' (Photo by Bob D'Amico/ABC via Getty Images)
Dallas Mavericks' Mark Cuban in action during an NBA basketball game against the Philadelphia 76ers, Monday, Nov. 16, 2015, in Philadelphia. (AP Photo/Matt Slocum)
Dallas Mavericks owner Mark Cuban reacts to a call during the first half of an NBA basketball game against the Philadelphia 76ers, Monday, Nov. 16, 2015, in Philadelphia. (AP Photo/Matt Slocum)
Dallas Mavericks owner Mark Cuban jokes with Boston Celtics forward Jae Crowder (99) during the first quarter of an NBA basketball game in Boston Wednesday, Nov. 18, 2015. (AP Photo/Charles Krupa)
Dallas Mavericks owner Mark Cuban watches from the bench during the first half of an NBA basketball game against the Los Angeles Clippers, Thursday, Oct. 29, 2015, in Los Angeles. (AP Photo/Jae C. Hong)
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Professor Dan Ariely creates a comfortable environment with different types of chairs.

The Duke professor and author has a Freudian-inspired therapist chair, a swinging chair, and a few low sofas to create an inviting environment for his students.

"I find that sitting on the sofas and talking to people in a close proximity changes the nature of the discussion," Ariely tells Business Insider. "I don't want to come from a position of being judgmental — but collaborative — so talking in this way is incredibly helpful."

Oprah Winfrey is a fan of snail mail, and keeps all the necessary supplies on her desk.

Vanity Fair reported that Oprah keeps a letter opener that was gifted to her, and it's not just for show; she prefers to open mail with the old-fashioned tool.

She also enjoys sending letters as much as receiving, and keeps stationary and a pen close by for hand-written notes.

Burberry CEO Christopher Bailey keeps his desk playful with sweets and toys.

The fashion designer and CEO of Burberry curbs his chocolate cravings by always having his favorite candy, Maltersers, within arms reach.

He also keeps a Lego duck that his niece made for him in his office, as reported by Vanity Fair.

Chegg.com CEO Daniel Rosensweig shows Hobart College pride.

The CEO of chegg.com keeps his alma mater's mascot close by. "All of our conference rooms are college-themed," Rosensweig tells Business Insider, "and my office and conference room are named for my own alma mater, Hobart and William Smith College, and for the school that my daughters attend, Colgate."

While a large image of the Hobart Statesman occupies one wall, another has been replaced with a garage door that can open or close for meetings. "The reason for the garage is to remind our management team of the Silicon Valley startup ethos," he says. "None of us are founders of the company, but we see ourselves as re-founders, and the garage is a constant reminder to be nimble, smart, innovative, and frugal."

Al Gore has a large frog statue on his wall.

The politician's cluttered office is filled with stacks of paper and reading materials.

What stands out though is a large, multi-colored frog hanging on his office wall, according to Time.

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Bestselling author David Allen traded in a standard timer for something more decorative.

The productivity consultant and author of the international best-seller, "Getting Things Done," kept a two-minute sand timer on his desk until recently. "It was useful several years ago to train myself how long two minutes was — that's our recommendation for taking actions immediately that can be done within that time frame," Allen explains.

Now his internal clock alerts him when two minutes is up.

CEO and sports enthusiast Peter Guber crowds his desk with memorabilia.

The CEO of the multimedia Mandalay Entertainment Group, author, co-owner of the NBA's Golden State Warriors and the MLB's Los Angeles Dodgers, opted out of a traditional desk for a round table to house his bobblehead collection and other memorabilia.

Guber told LinkedIn that his office has "a round table with all equal chairs, and a collection of items earned, given, and used over the years in its center. I set it up this way so everyone coming to meet with me feels no control or hierarchy and sees the eye candy that represents our diverse business activities."

Adam Savage, co-host of Discovery Channel's 'MythBusters,' has a replica of the sword from 'Kill Bill.'

On an office tour for his YouTube channel "Tested," Adam Savage, who helped make props for the first and second episodes of "Star Wars," says his office is like a "revolving museum" of various props and memorabilia.

One of those props is an exact replica of the sword from "Kill Bill" that he hired a friend to make for him. The sword-maker found the suppliers for the original sword and contacted them for replica pieces, even down to the blade, which Savage says is the same blade from the same company that made the sword for Beatrix Kiddo, played by Uma Thurman.

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