Poll: Clinton holds 25-point national lead over Sanders

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Democrats Prepare to Square Off in Last Debate Before Iowa Caucuses

Hillary Clinton leads rival Bernie Sanders by 25 points nationally ahead of Sunday's final Democratic debate and the all-important Iowa caucuses, according to the latest results from the new NBC News/Wall Street Journal poll.

The debate will air on NBC at 9:00 pm ET.

Clinton is the first choice of 59 percent of Democratic primary voters, while Sanders gets the support of 34 percent. Martin O'Malley gets 2 percent.

Those numbers don't differ greatly from December, when the poll showed Clinton with a 19-point national advantage over Sanders, 56 percent to 37 percent.

Click through images from the 12/19 Democratic debate:

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12/19/2015: Third Democratic Debate
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Poll: Clinton holds 25-point national lead over Sanders
MANCHESTER, NH - DECEMBER 19: Democratic president candidate Bernie Sanders takes the stage at the democratic debate at Saint Anselm College December 19, 2015 in Manchester, New Hampshire. This is the third Democratic debate featuring Democratic candidates Hillary Clinton, Bernie Sanders and Martin O'Malley. (Photo by Andrew Burton/Getty Images)
Hillary Clinton, former Secretary of State and 2016 Democratic presidential candidate, waves as she arrives to the Democratic presidential candidate debate at Saint Anselm College in Manchester, New Hampshire, U.S., on Saturday, Dec. 19, 2015. A Democratic presidential campaign that has looked tame compared to the one being waged by Republicans appears to be taking a sharp turn for the nasty as the three candidates participate in their third debate. Photographer: Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images
US Democratic Presidential hopefuls (L-R) Bernie Sanders, Hillary Clinton and Martin O'Malley participate in the Democratic Presidential Debate hosted by ABC News at Saint Anselm College in Manchester, New Hampshire, on December 19, 2015. AFP PHOTO / JEWEL SAMAD / AFP / JEWEL SAMAD (Photo credit should read JEWEL SAMAD/AFP/Getty Images)
Bernie Sanders, left, Hillary Clinton, center, and Martin OâMalley, right, participate in a Democratic presidential primary debate Saturday, Dec. 19, 2015, at Saint Anselm College in Manchester, N.H. At the table are debate moderators Martha Raddatz, left, and David Muir, of ABC News. (AP Photo/Jim Cole)
Martin OâMalley, right, speaks alongside Bernie Sanders, left, and Hillary Clinton, center, during a Democratic presidential primary debate Saturday, Dec. 19, 2015, at Saint Anselm College in Manchester, N.H. (AP Photo/Jim Cole)
Bernie Sanders speaks during a Democratic presidential primary debate Saturday, Dec. 19, 2015, at Saint Anselm College in Manchester, N.H. (AP Photo/Jim Cole)
US Democratic Presidential hopefuls (L-R) Bernie Sanders, Hillary Clinton and Martin O'Malley participate in the Democratic Presidential Debate hosted by ABC News at Saint Anselm College in Manchester, New Hampshire, on December 19, 2015. AFP PHOTO / JEWEL SAMAD / AFP / JEWEL SAMAD (Photo credit should read JEWEL SAMAD/AFP/Getty Images)
Bernie Sanders, left, offers an apology to Hillary Clinton during a Democratic presidential primary debate Saturday, Dec. 19, 2015, at Saint Anselm College in Manchester, N.H. (AP Photo/Jim Cole)
Senator Bernie Sanders, an independent from Vermont and 2016 Democratic presidential candidate, arrives to the Democratic presidential candidate debate at Saint Anselm College in Manchester, New Hampshire, U.S., on Saturday, Dec. 19, 2015. A Democratic presidential campaign that has looked tame compared to the one being waged by Republicans appears to be taking a sharp turn for the nasty as the three candidates participate in their third debate. Photographer: Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images
US Democratic Presidential hopefuls (L-R) Bernie Sanders, Hillary Clinton and Martin O'Malley participate in the Democratic Presidential Debate hosted by ABC News at Saint Anselm College in Manchester, New Hampshire, on December 19, 2015. AFP PHOTO / JEWEL SAMAD / AFP / JEWEL SAMAD (Photo credit should read JEWEL SAMAD/AFP/Getty Images)
Senator Bernie Sanders, an independent from Vermont and 2016 Democratic presidential candidate, speaks during the Democratic presidential candidate debate at Saint Anselm College in Manchester, New Hampshire, U.S., on Saturday, Dec. 19, 2015. A Democratic presidential campaign that has looked tame compared to the one being waged by Republicans appears to be taking a sharp turn for the nasty as the three candidates participate in their third debate. Photographer: Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images
Hillary Clinton speaks during a Democratic presidential primary debate Saturday, Dec. 19, 2015, at Saint Anselm College in Manchester, N.H. (AP Photo/Jim Cole)
Hillary Clinton, former Secretary of State and 2016 Democratic presidential candidate, smiles after walking on stage following a break in the Democratic presidential candidate debate at Saint Anselm College in Manchester, New Hampshire, U.S., on Saturday, Dec. 19, 2015. A Democratic presidential campaign that has looked tame compared to the one being waged by Republicans appears to be taking a sharp turn for the nasty as the three candidates participate in their third debate. Photographer: Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images
Senator Bernie Sanders, an independent from Vermont and 2016 Democratic presidential candidate, left, and Hillary Clinton, former Secretary of State and 2016 Democratic presidential candidate, share a laugh during a break in the Democratic presidential candidate debate at Saint Anselm College in Manchester, New Hampshire, U.S., on Saturday, Dec. 19, 2015. A Democratic presidential campaign that has looked tame compared to the one being waged by Republicans appears to be taking a sharp turn for the nasty as the three candidates participate in their third debate. Photographer: Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images
Senator Bernie Sanders, an independent from Vermont and 2016 Democratic presidential candidate, left, and Hillary Clinton, former Secretary of State and 2016 Democratic presidential candidate, share a laugh during a break in the Democratic presidential candidate debate at Saint Anselm College in Manchester, New Hampshire, U.S., on Saturday, Dec. 19, 2015. A Democratic presidential campaign that has looked tame compared to the one being waged by Republicans appears to be taking a sharp turn for the nasty as the three candidates participate in their third debate. Photographer: Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images
MANCHESTER, NH - DECEMBER 19: Democratic president candidate Bernie Sanders waits as Hillary Clinton walks on stage at Saint Anselm College December 19, 2015 in Manchester, New Hampshire. This is the third Democratic debate featuring Democratic candidates Hillary Clinton, Bernie Sanders and Martin O'Malley. (Photo by Andrew Burton/Getty Images)
MANCHESTER, NH - DECEMBER 19: Democratic president candidate Bernie Sanders speaks at the debate at Saint Anselm College December 19, 2015 in Manchester, New Hampshire. This is the third Democratic debate featuring Democratic candidates Hillary Clinton, Bernie Sanders and Martin O'Malley. (Photo by Andrew Burton/Getty Images)
2016 Democratic presidential candidates Senator Bernie Sanders, an independent from Vermont, from left, Hillary Clinton, former Secretary of State, and Martin O'Malley, former governor of Maryland, participate in the Democratic presidential candidate debate at Saint Anselm College in Manchester, New Hampshire, U.S., on Saturday, Dec. 19, 2015. A Democratic presidential campaign that has looked tame compared to the one being waged by Republicans appears to be taking a sharp turn for the nasty as the three candidates participate in their third debate. Photographer: Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images
Martin O'Malley, former governor of Maryland and 2016 Democratic presidential candidate, speaks during the Democratic presidential candidate debate at Saint Anselm College in Manchester, New Hampshire, U.S., on Saturday, Dec. 19, 2015. A Democratic presidential campaign that has looked tame compared to the one being waged by Republicans appears to be taking a sharp turn for the nasty as the three candidates participate in their third debate. Photographer: Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images
Martin O'Malley, former governor of Maryland and 2016 Democratic presidential candidate, right, speaks as Hillary Clinton, former Secretary of State and 2016 Democratic presidential candidate, listens during the Democratic presidential candidate debate at Saint Anselm College in Manchester, New Hampshire, U.S., on Saturday, Dec. 19, 2015. A Democratic presidential campaign that has looked tame compared to the one being waged by Republicans appears to be taking a sharp turn for the nasty as the three candidates participate in their third debate. Photographer: Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images
US Democratic presidential hopeful Hillary Clinton smiles as she walks past fellow candidate Bernie Sanders during a break of the Democratic Presidential Debate hosted by ABC News at the Saint Anselm College in Manchester, New Hampshire, on December 19, 2015. AFP PHOTO/JEWEL SAMAD / AFP / JEWEL SAMAD (Photo credit should read JEWEL SAMAD/AFP/Getty Images)
Hillary Clinton speaks during a Democratic presidential primary debate Saturday, Dec. 19, 2015, at Saint Anselm College in Manchester, N.H. (AP Photo/Jim Cole)
Martin OâMalley speaks during a Democratic presidential primary debate Saturday, Dec. 19, 2015, at Saint Anselm College in Manchester, N.H. (AP Photo/Jim Cole)
Bernie Sanders speaks during a Democratic presidential primary debate Saturday, Dec. 19, 2015, at Saint Anselm College in Manchester, N.H. (AP Photo/Jim Cole)
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Related: How to Watch the NBC News-YouTube Democratic Debate

But Clinton's current 25-point lead contrasts with other recent national polling, including a New York Times/CBS survey, which found Clinton with just a seven-point advantage.

The NBC/WSJ poll screens out Democratic and Republican voters who aren't expected to participate in the presidential primaries and caucuses.

The new poll also finds 79 percent of Democratic primary voters saying that they could see themselves supporting Clinton, versus 18 percent who couldn't (+61) — essentially unchanged from December's 82 percent-to-17 percent score (+65).

Related: Full Coverage of the Presidential Race

By comparison, 66 percent of Democratic primary voters say they could see themselves supporting Sanders, versus 25 percent who couldn't (+41), and O'Malley has a 22 percent-to-51 percent score (-29).

Despite Clinton's lead over Sanders, the Vermont senator bests Clinton among the four-in-10 Democratic voters who prefer a presidential candidate who brings change to current policies,63 percent to 26 percent.

Related: Poll: Sanders Outperforms Clinton in Matchup Against Trump

Yet among the more than half of Democrats who instead want experience and a tested candidate, Clinton beats Sanders, 71 percent to 30 percent.

Overall, 61 percent of all voters want change, while 36 percent prefer experience.

More from NBCNews.com:

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