Indonesian police arrest 12 after Jakarta attack

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In the Footsteps of Jakarta Attackers


JAKARTA, Indonesia (AP) — Indonesian police said Saturday they have arrested 12 people suspected of links to the Jakarta bombings.

The audacious attacks by suicide bombers and gunmen on Thursday in central Jakarta killed seven people, including two civilians. It was the first major assault by militants in Indonesia since 2009 and police said the attackers were tied to the Islamic State group.

National police chief Gen. Badrodin Haiti told reporters that arrests were made in west and east Java and in Kalimantan.

PHOTOS: Jakarta tries to get back to normal after attacks

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Indonesian police arrest 12 after Jakarta attack
Workers clean up outside the Starbucks cafe where an attack occurred on Thursday, in Jakarta, Indonesia, Friday, Jan. 15, 2016. Indonesians were shaken but refusing to be cowed a day after a deadly attack in a busy district of central Jakarta that has been claimed by the Islamic State group. (AP Photo/Tatan Syuflana)
An armed policeman stands in front of a Burger King restaurant near the Starbucks cafe where Thursday's attack occurred in Jakarta, Indonesia, on Friday, Jan. 15, 2016. A day after attackers detonated bombs and engaged in gunbattles with police in the central part of Indonesias capital, Jakarta tried to get itself back on track.(AP Photo/Tatan Syuflana)
Officials survey the damage inside the Starbucks cafe where Thursday's attack occurred in Jakarta, Indonesia, on Friday, Jan. 15, 2016. A day after attackers detonated bombs and engaged in gunbattles with police in the central part of IndonesiaÂs capital, Jakarta tried to get itself back on track. (AP Photo/Tatan Syuflana)
Wreaths of condolence for attack victims, one with the words "Let's Not Fight Each Other", are brought to the area outside the Starbucks cafe where Thursday's attack occurred in Jakarta, Indonesia, on Friday, Jan. 15, 2016. A day after attackers detonated bombs and engaged in gunbattles with police in the central part of Indonesias capital, Jakarta tried to get itself back on track. (AP Photo/Tatan Syuflana)
A motorized three-wheeled taxi carrying Muslim students drives past the Starbucks cafe where Thursday's attack occurred in Jakarta, Indonesia, on Friday, Jan. 15, 2016. A day after attackers detonated bombs and engaged in gunbattles with police in the central part of IndonesiaÂs capital, Jakarta tried to get itself back on track. (AP Photo/Dita Alangkara)
Indonesian men uses their mobile phones to take pictures outside the Starbucks cafe where Thursday's attack occurred in Jakarta, Indonesia, on Friday, Jan. 15, 2016. A day after attackers detonated bombs and engaged in gunbattles with police in the central part of Indonesias capital, Jakarta tried to get itself back on track. (AP Photo/Dita Alangkara)
Curious onlookers gather outside the Starbucks cafe where Thursday's attack occurred in Jakarta, Indonesia, on Friday, Jan. 15, 2016. A day after attackers detonated bombs and engaged in gunbattles with police in the central part of Indonesias capital, Jakarta tried to get itself back on track. (AP Photo/Dita Alangkara)
Security guards check the bags of pedestrians outside of a McDonald's restaurant across the street from the Starbucks cafe where Thursday's attack occurred in Jakarta, Indonesia, Friday, Jan. 15, 2016. A day after attackers detonated bombs and engaged in gunbattles with police in the central part of IndonesiaÂs capital, Jakarta tried to get itself back on track. (AP Photo/Tatan Syuflana)
A man poses for a photo outside the Starbucks cafe where Thursday's attack occurred in Jakarta, Indonesia, on Friday, Jan. 15, 2016. A day after attackers detonated bombs and engaged in gunbattles with police in the central part of Indonesias capital, Jakarta tried to get itself back on track. (AP Photo/Dita Alangkara)
A man takes a selfie outside the Starbucks cafe where Thursday's attack occurred in Jakarta, Indonesia, on Friday, Jan. 15, 2016. A day after attackers detonated bombs and engaged in gunbattles with police in the central part of Indonesias capital, Jakarta tried to get itself back on track. (AP Photo/Dita Alangkara)
A man stands on a traffic median with a poster of John Lennon across the street from Sarinah shopping mall near the Starbucks cafe where Thursday's attack occurred in Jakarta, Indonesia, Friday, Jan. 15, 2016. A day after attackers detonated bombs and engaged in gunbattles with police in the central part of Indonesias capital, Jakarta tried to get itself back on track. (AP Photo/Tatan Syuflana)
A man reads a newspaper with a front page story about Thursday's attacks at the Starbucks cafe in Jakarta, Indonesia, Friday, Jan. 15, 2016. A day after attackers detonated bombs and engaged in gunbattles with police in the central part of Indonesias capital, Jakarta tried to get itself back on track. (AP Photo/Tatan Syuflana)
Muslims perform Friday prayers at a mosque in Jakarta, Indonesia, Friday, Jan. 15, 2016. A day after attackers detonated bombs and engaged in gunbattles with police in the central part of IndonesiaÂs capital, Jakarta tried to get itself back on track. (AP Photo/Achmad Ibrahim)
Muslims perform Friday prayers at a mosque in Jakarta, Indonesia, Friday, Jan. 15, 2016. A day after attackers detonated bombs and engaged in gunbattles with police in the central part of Indonesias capital, Jakarta tried to get itself back on track. (AP Photo/Achmad Ibrahim)
A woman walks past a banner on a pedestrian bridge with the words "We are Not Afraid" following Thursday's attacks at the Starbucks cafe in Jakarta, Indonesia, Friday, Jan. 15, 2016. A day after attackers detonated bombs and engaged in gunbattles with police in the central part of Indonesias capital, Jakarta tried to get itself back on track. (AP Photo/Dita Alangkara)
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Elaborating on an earlier claim that the militants received funding via an Indonesian fighting with the IS in Syria, he said police have determined money was transferred to Indonesia via Western Union.

Separately, authorities say they have blocked more than a dozen websites expressing support for Thursday's attack as they try to counter radical Islamic ideology online.

Communications Ministry spokesman Ismail Cawidu urged Indonesians to report militant websites and social media accounts.

In recent years, Indonesian counterterrorism forces successfully stamped out the extremist group Jemaah Islamiyah that was responsible for several attacks, including the 2002 bombings of bars in Bali which killed 202 people, as well as two hotel bombings in Jakarta in 2009 that killed seven people.

Terrorism experts say IS supporters in Indonesia are drawn from the remnants of Jemaah Islamiyah and other groups but are also trying to recruit new members.

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