Law enforcement prevent fatal heroin, opiate overdoses with one drug

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Narcan Heroin Overdose Revival Video: Woman Comes Back to Life Thanks to Drug

Last year, a New Jersey woman called 911 to report that a passenger in her vehicle was unresponsive and not breathing. Shortly after the woman began performing CPR on the victim, law enforcement responded to the scene and determined the victim was under the influence of heroin.

After the officers administered Naloxone Hydrochloride (Narcan) the victim began breathing in seconds, marking another life saved by Narcan, Florham Park Eagle reports.

SEE MORE: Alarming state of drug abuse in the United States

Narcan is an aerosol version of Naloxone, an opioid antagonist that can be used to counter the effects of an opiate overdose by displacing opioids from the receptors in the brain that control the central nervous system and respiratory system.

Opiate abuse in the U.S. has increased significantly over the past decade. According to a report by the Drug Enforcement Administration, deaths caused by heroin overdoses increased by 172 percent between 2010 and 2013. With the number of overdoes on the rise in America, the drug Narcan has become lifesaving for communities hit hardest by this fatal epidemic.

​See more on Narcan:

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Heroin Beyond Narcan
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Law enforcement prevent fatal heroin, opiate overdoses with one drug
In this Thursday, Oct. 29, 2015 photograph, Billie Fisher stands in an industrial area of Camden, N.J., as she talks about being given the drug naloxone a couple years ago, to reverse a heroin overdose. Fisher said after being given the drug, she was in an emergency room in painful withdrawal. Naloxone works most of the time, but national statistics aren't kept on what happens to people who are revived. Some overdose again soon afterward. Some get treatment and get clean, but limited insurance, high costs and a shortage of spots at treatment centers can be hurdles. (AP Photo/Mel Evans)
In this Thursday, Oct. 29, 2015 photograph, a jug of used needles to exchange for new is seen near, Jim "Woods" Ellis in an industrial area of Camden, N.J., as Ellis describes using the drug, naloxone, often known by the brand name Nacran, to reverse an addict's heroin overdose. Naloxone works most of the time, but national statistics arenât kept on what happens to people who are revived. Some overdose again soon afterward. Some get treatment and get clean, but limited insurance, high costs and a shortage of spots at treatment centers can be hurdles. (AP Photo/Mel Evans)
In this Thursday, Oct. 29, 2015 photograph, Jim "Woods" Ellis stands in an industrial area of Camden,N.J., as he describes using the drug, naloxone, often known by the brand name Nacran, to reverse an addict's heroin overdose. Naloxone works most of the time, but national statistics arenât kept on what happens to people who are revived. Some overdose again soon afterward. Some get treatment and get clean, but limited insurance, high costs and a shortage of spots at treatment centers can be hurdles. (AP Photo/Mel Evans)
In this Thursday, Oct. 29, 2015 photograph, Billie Fisher stands in an industrial area of Camden, N.J., as she talks about being given the drug naloxone a couple years ago, to reverse a heroin overdose. Fisher said after being given the drug, she was in an emergency room in painful withdrawal. Naloxone works most of the time, but national statistics arenât kept on what happens to people who are revived. Some overdose again soon afterward. Some get treatment and get clean, but limited insurance, high costs and a shortage of spots at treatment centers can be hurdles. (AP Photo/Mel Evans)
In this Thursday, Oct. 29, 2015 photograph, Billie Fisher stands in an industrial area of Camden, N.J., as she talks about being given the drug naloxone a couple years ago, to reverse a heroin overdose. Fisher said after being given the drug, she was in an emergency room in painful withdrawal. Naloxone works most of the time, but national statistics arenât kept on what happens to people who are revived. Some overdose again soon afterward. Some get treatment and get clean, but limited insurance, high costs and a shortage of spots at treatment centers can be hurdles. (AP Photo/Mel Evans)
FILE- In this Wednesday, Feb. 19, 2014 file photograph, a small bottle of the opiate overdose treatment drug, naloxone, also known by its brand name Narcan, is displayed at the South Jersey AIDS Alliance in Atlantic City, N.J. Naloxone works by blocking the brain receptors that opiates latch onto and helping the body "remember" to take in air. the treatment drug works most of the time, but national statistics arenât kept on what happens to people who are revived. Some overdose again soon afterward. Some get treatment and get clean, but limited insurance, high costs and a shortage of spots at treatment centers can be hurdles. (AP Photo/Mel Evans,file)
In this Thursday, Oct. 29, 2015 photograph, with a jug of used needles to exchange for new nearby, Jim "Woods" Ellis stands in an industrial area of Camden,N.J., as he describes using the drug, naloxone, often known by the brand name Nacran, to reverse an addict's heroin overdose. Naloxone works most of the time, but national statistics arenât kept on what happens to people who are revived. Some overdose again soon afterward. Some get treatment and get clean, but limited insurance, high costs and a shortage of spots at treatment centers can be hurdles. (AP Photo/Mel Evans)
In this Thursday, Oct. 29, 2015 photograph, Billie Fisher stands in an industrial area of Camden, N.J., as she talks about being given the drug naloxone a couple years ago, to reverse a heroin overdose. Fisher said after being given the drug, she was in an emergency room in painful withdrawal. Naloxone works most of the time, but national statistics arenât kept on what happens to people who are revived. Some overdose again soon afterward. Some get treatment and get clean, but limited insurance, high costs and a shortage of spots at treatment centers can be hurdles. (AP Photo/Mel Evans)
In this Thursday, Oct. 29, 2015 photograph, Jim "Woods" Ellis lights the stub of a cigarette as he stands in an industrial area of Camden, N.J. Woods describes using the drug, naloxone, often known by the brand name Nacran, to reverse an addict's heroin overdose. Naloxone works most of the time, but national statistics arenât kept on what happens to people who are revived. Some overdose again soon afterward. Some get treatment and get clean, but limited insurance, high costs and a shortage of spots at treatment centers can be hurdles. (AP Photo/Mel Evans)
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In Indianapolis, Republican Sen. Jim Merritt says the number of lives saved by Indianapolis Emergency Medical Services with Narcan has risen from 629 in 2013 to more than 1,150 in 2015.

The New Hampshire Department of Health and Human Services recently purchased 4,500 Narcan kits to be distributed in the state's public health networks. "Naloxone or Narcan is not a silver bullet, but it saves lives," Laconia Deputy Fire Chief Sean Reilly said during the distribution meeting.

Morris County officials in New Jersey recently announced that during 2015, law enforcement agencies in the county saved 42 people from succumbing to a fatal opiate overdose through the administration of Narcan.

In 2015 the FDA approved the first nasal spray version of Naloxone Hydrochloride. Narcan nasal spray can be purchased in most counties with a prescription, but many are taking steps to make the drug available over the counter.

Although Narcan has saved multiple lives in the past year, critics claim that wider access to Narcan would promote drug use by giving users a sense of security. Despite these claims officials across the country are calling for the drug to be more accessible.

Related: Heroin is a formidable foe in southern Ohio county:

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NTP: Heroin proves a formidable foe in suburban Ohio county
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Law enforcement prevent fatal heroin, opiate overdoses with one drug
In this Thursday, Sept. 17, 2015, photo, used heroin syringes are stored in a water bottle as Steve Monnin cleans a wooded area in Combs Park, in Hamilton, Ohio. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has called heroin use a national epidemic and it is hitting hard in southern Ohio. The CDC says heroin-related deaths nationally nearly quadrupled in a decade; and in Ohio's Butler County, they have nearly quadrupled in just the past three years. (AP Photo/John Minchillo)
In this Wednesday, Sept. 2, 2015, photo, Dorothy McIntosh Shuemake, mother of Alison Shuemake who died of a suspected heroin overdose, cries as she clutches her daughter's toy stuffed rabbit during an interview at her home, in Middletown, Ohio. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has called heroin use a national epidemic and it is hitting hard in southern Ohio. The CDC says heroin-related deaths nationally nearly quadrupled in a decade; and in Ohio's Butler County, they have nearly quadrupled in just the past three years. (AP Photo/John Minchillo)
In this Thursday, Sept. 17, 2015, photo, used heroin syringes and cooking spoons are found hidden at the base of trees as Steve Monnin cleans a wooded area of Combs Park in Hamilton, Ohio. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has called a heroin use a national epidemic and it is hitting hard in southern Ohio. (AP Photo/John Minchillo)
In this Thursday, Sept. 17, 2015, photo, Steve Monnin searches through the thick brush of a wooded area frequented by heroin users as he cleans Combs Park in Hamilton, Ohio. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has called heroin use a national epidemic and it is hitting hard in southern Ohio. (AP Photo/John Minchillo)
In this Friday, Sept. 18, 2015, photo, Melissa Smith-Procter is interviewed in the kitchen area of her workplace at Sojourner Recovery Services in Hamilton, Ohio. Smith-Procter said sheâs had two ex-boyfriends, several other friends and two women she was in treatment with die from heroin. She recently celebrated 20 months of sobriety after more than two decades of abusing drugs and alcohol. (AP Photo/John Minchillo)
In this Wednesday, Sept. 2, 2015, photo, Dorothy McIntosh Shuemake and Fred Shuemake, parents of Alison Shuemake who died of a suspected heroin overdose, browse a picture collage of their daughter at their home, in Middletown, Ohio. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has called heroin use a national epidemic and it is hitting hard in southern Ohio. (AP Photo/John Minchillo)
In this Wednesday, Sept. 2, 2015, photo, Dorothy McIntosh Shuemake, mother of Alison Shuemake who died of a suspected heroin overdose, looks at pictures of her daughter during an interview at her home, in Middletown, Ohio. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has called heroin use a national epidemic and it is hitting hard in southern Ohio. (AP Photo/John Minchillo)
In this Friday, Sept. 18, 2015, photo, Melissa Smith-Procter wipes tears from her eyes as she speaks about the trust her employers show her as she was interviewed in the kitchen area of her workplace at Sojourner Recovery Services in Hamilton, Ohio. Smith-Procter said sheâs had two ex-boyfriends, several other friends and two women she was in treatment with die from heroin. She recently celebrated 20 months of sobriety after more than two decades of abusing drugs and alcohol. (AP Photo/John Minchillo)
In this Wednesday, Aug. 26, 2015, photo, Butler County Coroner Dr. Lisa Mannix is interviewed at her office in West Chester Township, Ohio. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has called heroin use a national epidemic and it is hitting hard in southern Ohio. Mannix recently investigated three overdose deaths within a few hours. She says getting results is âa big, big ship to turn around.â (AP Photo/Dan Sewell)
In this Friday, Sept. 18, 2015, photo, Melissa Smith-Procter is interviewed in the kitchen area of her workplace at Sojourner Recovery Services in Hamilton, Ohio. Smith-Procter said sheâs had two ex-boyfriends, several other friends and two women she was in treatment with die from heroin. She recently celebrated 20 months of sobriety after more than two decades of abusing drugs and alcohol. (AP Photo/John Minchillo)
In this Thursday, Sept. 17, 2015, photo, Steve Monnin, 57, places a heroin syringe in a water bottle as he cleans Combs Park in Hamilton, Ohio. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has called heroin use a national epidemic and it is hitting hard in southern Ohio. The CDC says heroin-related deaths nationally nearly quadrupled in a decade; and in Butler County, they have nearly quadrupled in just the past three years. (AP Photo/John Minchillo)
In this Thursday, Sept. 17, 2015, photo, a loaded heroin syringe is found in the underbrush of a wooded area in Combs Park in Hamilton, Ohio. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has called heroin use a national epidemic and it is hitting hard in southern Ohio. (AP Photo/John Minchillo)
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