Chicago releases videos of police shooting of black teen

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Videos Released of Fatal 2013 Chicago Police Shooting

CHICAGO, Jan 14 (Reuters) - A federal judge ruled on Thursday that video footage of a fatal Chicago police shooting of a black teenager in 2013 can be released as protesters renewed criticism of Mayor Rahm Emanuel for the handling of police killings.

Images from neighborhood surveillance cameras showing the killing of Cedrick Chatman, 17, in January 2013 had been sealed under a protective order.

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One 10-second segment of video shows two officers chasing Chatman, who then runs around a corner out of sight. It next shows an officer drawing his gun, followed by an image of Chatman on the ground.

WARNING: The video included below may disturb some viewers

Raw Surveillance Video Shows Shooting of Chicago Teen

U.S. District Judge Robert Gettleman's decision allowing release of the videos comes with Emanuel and the police department already under pressure over a fatal 2014 police shooting of another teenager. The video of that killing was not released until last November.

Gettleman said at a hearing on Thursday morning that releasing the Chatman videos would not interfere with finding impartial jurors for a civil lawsuit by the teenager's family. The city had withdrawn its opposition to the videos' release.

See photos from the unfolding story:

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Chicago releases videos of police shooting of black teen
Mark Smolens, podium left, and Brian Coffman right, attorneys for the family of Cedrick Chatman, who was shot and killed by Chicago police in 2013, speak at a news conference at the federal courthouse Thursday, Jan. 14, 2016, in Chicago. A federal judge on Thursday granted the release of 2013 surveillance video showing a white Chicago police officer fatally shooting Chatman, a 17-year-old black carjacking suspect after the city withdrew its objection to it being made public.  (AP Photo/M. Spencer Green)
Mark Smolens, left, and Brian Coffman right, attorneys for the family of Cedrick Chatman who was shot and killed by Chicago police in 2013, speak at a news conference at the federal courthouse Thursday, Jan. 14, 2016, in Chicago. A federal judge on Thursday granted the release of 2013 surveillance video showing a white Chicago police officer fatally shooting Chatman, a 17-year-old black carjacking suspect after the city withdrew its objection to it being made public.  (AP Photo/M. Spencer Green)
Linda Chatman, 40, talks about her son Cedrick at her apartment on Thursday, Aug. 28, 2014 in Chicago. Cedrick Chatman, 17, was killed by the Chicago police. (Zbigniew Bzdak/Chicago Tribune/TNS via Getty Images)
Mark Smolens, an attorney for the family of Cedrick Chatman who was shot and killed by Chicago police in 2013, speaks at a news conference at the federal courthouse Thursday, Jan. 14, 2016, in Chicago. A federal judge on Thursday granted the release of 2013 surveillance video showing a white Chicago police officer fatally shooting Chatman, a 17-year-old black carjacking suspect after the city withdrew its objection to it being made public.  (AP Photo/M. Spencer Green)
Brian Coffman, attorney for the family of Cedrick Chatman who was shot and killed by Chicago police in 2013, speaks at a news conference at the federal courthouse Thursday, Jan. 14, 2016, in Chicago. A federal judge on Thursday granted the release of 2013 surveillance video showing a white Chicago police officer fatally shooting Chatman, a 17-year-old black carjacking suspect after the city withdrew its objection to it being made public.  (AP Photo/M. Spencer Green)
Mark Smolens, left, Nicole Barkowski, and Brian Coffman right, attorneys for the family of Cedrick Chatman, who was shot and killed by Chicago police in 2013, speak at a news conference at the federal courthouse Thursday, Jan. 14, 2016, in Chicago. A federal judge on Thursday granted the release of 2013 surveillance video showing a white Chicago police officer fatally shooting Chatman, a 17-year-old black carjacking suspect after the city withdrew its objection to it being made public.  (AP Photo/M. Spencer Green)
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Protesters at Thursday's hearing called for Emanuel to take more action to reform the police department. For weeks protesters have been demanding he step down over his handling of the 2014 police killing of Laquan McDonald, 17. Activists also want State's Attorney Anita Alvarez, who blocked release of the McDonald video for a year, to resign.

Black pastors and community leaders said they would boycott Emanuel's annual Martin Luther King prayer breakfast on Friday to protest the city's handling of police shootings.

Lawyers for Chatman's mother, who is suing the city over her son's death, say the videos contradict police statements that Chatman, a carjacking suspect, had pointed a dark object at them.

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An attorney for the police officers said the videos support their story.

Also on Thursday, the Cook County Medical Examiner released autopsy reports in the Dec. 26 police shooting of black college student Quintonio LeGrier, 19, and his neighbor Bettie Jones, 55.

The reports showed LeGrier was shot six times, including once in the chest and twice in the back. Jones, who police say was shot by accident, was hit once in the chest.

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Emanuel fired his police chief in December and is seeking a new superintendent for the 12,000-strong force, which has a history of abuse allegations.

The Justice Department is investigating Chicago police use of lethal force.

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