You're cutting your pizza wrong

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You're Cutting Your Pizza Wrong


BY: Troy Frisby

While it's probably not recommended by the USDA, for many of us, pizza is basically it's own food group.

But it turns out that, try as we might, humans haven't been totally fair when it comes to cutting equal slices.

Two mathematicians from the University of Liverpool looked into how people can split a pizza into precisely equal pieces.

Apparently, you need to have the steady hand of a surgeon to get it right. Because in order to cut evenly, people must create curved slices to form a monohedral disc.

The researchers admitted that they're unsure whether there's any value to their work beyond dicing up a nice pie.

Aside from that, the pizza research itself isn't foolproof. For one, it doesn't solve all major issues, because some of the slices will then be heavy on crust, while others will be lacking.

There's more than one pattern, but some of them get pretty intricate, considering the time and patience it would take.

Perhaps most importantly, this study ignores the cheese factor. Because as many people have learned the hard way, the only substance more volatile than uranium is melted pizza cheese.

Related: America's pizza styles
10 PHOTOS
America's pizza styles
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You're cutting your pizza wrong

New York Thin Crust

(AP Photo/Kathy Willens)

Neapolitan

(Photo via Shutterstock)

California Style

(Photo by Lawrence K. Ho/Los Angeles Times via Getty Images)

Chicago Deep Dish

(Photo by Daniel Acker/Bloomberg via Getty Images)

Detroit Style

(Photo by Cyrus McCrimmon/The Denver Post via Getty Images)

New England Greek

(Photo via Getty Images)

Colorado Style

(Photo By Brian Brainerd/The Denver Post via Getty Images)

Tomato Pie

(Photo by Roberto Machado Noa/LightRocket via Getty Images)

Chicago Thin Crust

(AP Photo/Paul Beaty)

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