Maine Governor: Drug dealers often 'impregnate a young white girl'

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Maine Governor's Remarks About Out-Of-State Drug Traffickers

Maine's controversial Republican governor, Paul LePage, said that out-of-state drug traffickers with names like "D-Money" often "impregnate a young white girl" while visiting the area to sell heroin.

"These are guys with the name D-Money, Smoothie, Shifty ... these types of guys ... they come from Connecticut and New York, they come up here, they sell their heroin, they go back home," LePage said, according to the Portland Press Herald."Incidentally, half the time they impregnate a young, white girl before they leave, which is a real sad thing because then we have another issue we have to deal with down the road."

SEE MORE: 1-year-old child dies from apparent heroin overdose

Peter Steele, the governor's spokesman, said in a statement that LePage was "not making comments about race."

See photos of the governor:

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Maine Governor Paul LePage
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Maine Governor: Drug dealers often 'impregnate a young white girl'
Maine Gov. Paul LePage speaks before introducing Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump at campaign stop, Thursday, March 3, 2016, in Portland, Maine.(AP Photo/Robert F. Bukaty)
MEXICO, ME - MARCH 22: Gov. Paul LePage holds a town hall-style meeting in Mexico, Maine. (Photo by Ben McCanna/Portland Press Herald via Getty Images)
Republican U.S. presidential candidate Donald Trump shakes hands with Maine Governor Paul LePage (R) after LePage introduced him at a campaign rally in Portland, Maine March 3, 2016. REUTERS/Joel Page
PORTLAND, ME - DECEMBER 8: Gov. Paul LePage signals that he is done with answering questions during a 'town hall' session at the Abromson Center at the University of Southern Maine on Tuesday, December 8, 2015. (Photo by Derek Davis/Portland Press Herald via Getty Images)
PORTLAND, ME - DECEMBER 8: Gov. Paul LePage brings his town hall tour to Portland, speaking at the Abromson Center at the University of Southern Maine on Tuesday, December 8, 2015. (Photo by Derek Davis/Portland Press Herald via Getty Images)
PORTLAND, ME - DECEMBER 8: Gov. Paul LePage brings his town hall tour to Portland, speaking at the Abromson Center at the University of Southern Maine on Tuesday, December 8, 2015. (Photo by Derek Davis/Portland Press Herald via Getty Images)
PORTLAND, ME - DECEMBER 8: Gov. Paul LePage brings his town hall tour to Portland, speaking at the Abromson Center at the University of Southern Maine on Tuesday, December 8, 2015. An audience member holds up a sign as Gov. LePage leaves the room. (Photo by Derek Davis/Portland Press Herald via Getty Images)
LEWISTON, ME - OCTOBER 13: Gov. Paul LePage waved goodbye to the audience after holding a town hall style forum at the Regional Technical Center at Lewiston High School Tuesday, October 13, 2015. The Governor addressed issues of education, minimum wage, gun control, and more. (Photo by Gabe Souza/Portland Press Herald via Getty Images)
SACO, ME - SEPTEMBER 19: Governor Paul LePage cuts the ceremonial ribbon during the Riverwalk bridge dedication ceremony in Saco, ME on Saturday, September 19, 2015. (Photo by Whitney Hayward/Portland Press Herald via Getty Images)
PORTLAND - JUNE 3: Governor Paul LePage speaks about a grant from the Maine Department of Corrections to fund the Building Alternatives program at Learning Works. (Photo by Gordon Chibroski/Portland Press Herald via Getty Images)
AUGUSTA, ME - JANUARY 7: At the end of his inauguration speech, Gov. Paul LePage waves to the crowd at the Augusta Civic Center on Wednesday, January 7, 2015. (Photo by Gregory Rec/Portland Press Herald via Getty Images)
AUGUSTA, ME - JANUARY 7: Sen. Pres. Michael Thibodeau administers the oath of office to Gov. Paul LePage while First Lady Ann LePage looks on during his inauguration at the Augusta Civic Center on Wednesday, January 7, 2015. (Photo by Gregory Rec/Portland Press Herald via Getty Images)
AUGUSTA, ME - JANUARY 7: After taking the stage, Gov. Paul LePage acknowledges cheers from the crowd during his inauguration at the Augusta Civic Center on Wednesday, January 7, 2015. (Photo by Gregory Rec/Portland Press Herald via Getty Images)
LEWISTON, ME - NOVEMBER 5: Maine Governor Paul LePage speaks to supporters at the Franco American Heritage Center after being reelected on Wednesday, November 5, 2014. (Photo by Gregory Rec/Portland Press Herald via Getty Images)
AUBURN, ME - OCTOBER 21: Gov. Paul LePage talks with Jim Wellehan of Auburn in the lobby of WMTW television in Auburn, Tuesday, October 21, 2014, following the final of six gubernatorial debates. (Photo by Gabe Souza/Portland Press Herald via Getty Images)
AUGUSTA, ME - OCTOBER 15: Current Maine governor Paul LePage before the Maine State Chamber's Gubernatorial Forum at the Augusta Civic Center in Augusta, ME on Wednesday, October 15, 2014. (Photo by Whitney Hayward/Portland Press Herald via Getty Images)
AUGUSTA, ME - July 15: Maine Governor Paul LePage in his office at the State House in Augusta. (Photo by John Patriquin/Portland Press Herald via Getty Images)
GRAY, ME - JUNE 3: Gov. Paul LePage speaks at a Storey Brothers Excavating site in Gray on Tuesday. Tuesday, June 3, 2014. (Photo by Shawn Patrick Ouellette/Portland Press Herald via Getty Images)
Maine Governor Paul LePage delivers his State of the State Address in the House Chambers at the State House in Augusta on Tuesday February 4, 2014. (Photo by Carl D. Walsh/Portland Press Herald via Getty Images)
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"The governor is not making comments about race. Race is irrelevant," he said. "What is relevant is the cost to state taxpayers for welfare and the emotional costs for these kids who are born as a result of involvement with drug traffickers. His heart goes out to these kids because he had a difficult childhood too. We need to stop the drug traffickers from coming into our state."

LePage is swiftly coming under fire for the remark. Democratic presidential frontrunner Hillary Clinton's campaign issued a lengthy statement Thursday night blasting the governor's "racist rants."

"Governor LePage's comments tonight are not only offensive and hurtful but they try to cover up the very real epidemic of drug abuse facing people in his state and across the country. LePage's racist rants sadly distract from efforts to address one of our nation's most pressing problems," said the campaign's Marlon Marshall.

The Clinton team also sought to link LePage to her Republican rivals for presidency.

"Sadly, Governor LePage's comments aren't too dissimilar from the divisive, misleading and hateful rhetoric we're seeing from Republicans across the country these days," Marshall said.

RELATED: Photos of the heroin epidemic in our country

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NTP: Heroin proves a formidable foe in suburban Ohio county
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Maine Governor: Drug dealers often 'impregnate a young white girl'
In this Thursday, Sept. 17, 2015, photo, used heroin syringes are stored in a water bottle as Steve Monnin cleans a wooded area in Combs Park, in Hamilton, Ohio. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has called heroin use a national epidemic and it is hitting hard in southern Ohio. The CDC says heroin-related deaths nationally nearly quadrupled in a decade; and in Ohio's Butler County, they have nearly quadrupled in just the past three years. (AP Photo/John Minchillo)
In this Wednesday, Sept. 2, 2015, photo, Dorothy McIntosh Shuemake, mother of Alison Shuemake who died of a suspected heroin overdose, cries as she clutches her daughter's toy stuffed rabbit during an interview at her home, in Middletown, Ohio. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has called heroin use a national epidemic and it is hitting hard in southern Ohio. The CDC says heroin-related deaths nationally nearly quadrupled in a decade; and in Ohio's Butler County, they have nearly quadrupled in just the past three years. (AP Photo/John Minchillo)
In this Thursday, Sept. 17, 2015, photo, used heroin syringes and cooking spoons are found hidden at the base of trees as Steve Monnin cleans a wooded area of Combs Park in Hamilton, Ohio. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has called a heroin use a national epidemic and it is hitting hard in southern Ohio. (AP Photo/John Minchillo)
In this Thursday, Sept. 17, 2015, photo, Steve Monnin searches through the thick brush of a wooded area frequented by heroin users as he cleans Combs Park in Hamilton, Ohio. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has called heroin use a national epidemic and it is hitting hard in southern Ohio. (AP Photo/John Minchillo)
In this Friday, Sept. 18, 2015, photo, Melissa Smith-Procter is interviewed in the kitchen area of her workplace at Sojourner Recovery Services in Hamilton, Ohio. Smith-Procter said sheâs had two ex-boyfriends, several other friends and two women she was in treatment with die from heroin. She recently celebrated 20 months of sobriety after more than two decades of abusing drugs and alcohol. (AP Photo/John Minchillo)
In this Wednesday, Sept. 2, 2015, photo, Dorothy McIntosh Shuemake and Fred Shuemake, parents of Alison Shuemake who died of a suspected heroin overdose, browse a picture collage of their daughter at their home, in Middletown, Ohio. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has called heroin use a national epidemic and it is hitting hard in southern Ohio. (AP Photo/John Minchillo)
In this Wednesday, Sept. 2, 2015, photo, Dorothy McIntosh Shuemake, mother of Alison Shuemake who died of a suspected heroin overdose, looks at pictures of her daughter during an interview at her home, in Middletown, Ohio. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has called heroin use a national epidemic and it is hitting hard in southern Ohio. (AP Photo/John Minchillo)
In this Friday, Sept. 18, 2015, photo, Melissa Smith-Procter wipes tears from her eyes as she speaks about the trust her employers show her as she was interviewed in the kitchen area of her workplace at Sojourner Recovery Services in Hamilton, Ohio. Smith-Procter said sheâs had two ex-boyfriends, several other friends and two women she was in treatment with die from heroin. She recently celebrated 20 months of sobriety after more than two decades of abusing drugs and alcohol. (AP Photo/John Minchillo)
In this Wednesday, Aug. 26, 2015, photo, Butler County Coroner Dr. Lisa Mannix is interviewed at her office in West Chester Township, Ohio. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has called heroin use a national epidemic and it is hitting hard in southern Ohio. Mannix recently investigated three overdose deaths within a few hours. She says getting results is âa big, big ship to turn around.â (AP Photo/Dan Sewell)
In this Friday, Sept. 18, 2015, photo, Melissa Smith-Procter is interviewed in the kitchen area of her workplace at Sojourner Recovery Services in Hamilton, Ohio. Smith-Procter said sheâs had two ex-boyfriends, several other friends and two women she was in treatment with die from heroin. She recently celebrated 20 months of sobriety after more than two decades of abusing drugs and alcohol. (AP Photo/John Minchillo)
In this Thursday, Sept. 17, 2015, photo, Steve Monnin, 57, places a heroin syringe in a water bottle as he cleans Combs Park in Hamilton, Ohio. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has called heroin use a national epidemic and it is hitting hard in southern Ohio. The CDC says heroin-related deaths nationally nearly quadrupled in a decade; and in Butler County, they have nearly quadrupled in just the past three years. (AP Photo/John Minchillo)
In this Thursday, Sept. 17, 2015, photo, a loaded heroin syringe is found in the underbrush of a wooded area in Combs Park in Hamilton, Ohio. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has called heroin use a national epidemic and it is hitting hard in southern Ohio. (AP Photo/John Minchillo)
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LePage has endorsed GOP candidate Chris Christie and campaigned with him in early primary state New Hampshire, where Christie has emphasized his plans to address addiction.

LePage is no stranger to controversial comments. He has compared the IRS to the Gestapo and suggested that President Barack Obama "go to hell." He alsodenied reports that he once told a told a crowd that Obama "hates white people."

He's also facing an impeachment threat from some in the state legislature over charges of abuse of power. As of late last year, his approval rating in the state was only at about 32 percent.

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