Vatican newspaper denounces 'woeful' Charlie Hebdo cover

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Mistake on Charlie Hebdo Memorial Plaque Unveiled by Holland

The Vatican newspaper has criticized French satirical weekly Charlie Hebdo for depicting God as a Kalashnikov-carrying killer, saying it was "woeful" and disrespectful to true believers of all faiths.

The cover was an anniversary edition, commemorating the attacks a year ago when Islamist militants killed 12 during an assault on the Charlie Hebdo newsroom in Paris. The cartoon on the cover shows an angry God with blood on his hands and a rifle strapped to his back.

"One year later, the assassin is still on the run," the headline says.

The Vatican daily newspaper L'Osservatore Romano accused Charlie Hebdo of looking to "manipulate" faith.

"Behind the deceptive flag of an uncompromising secularism, the French weekly once again forgets what religious leaders of every faith have been urging for ages - to reject violence in the name of religion and that using God to justify hatred is a genuine blasphemy," it wrote in a short commentary.

"Charlie Hebdo's move shows the sad paradox of a world which is increasingly sensitive about being politically correct to the point of being ridiculous ... but does not want to recognize or respect believers' faith in God, regardless of their religion."

FRANCE-ATTACKS-MEDIA-CHARLIE-HEBDO-ANNIVERSARY

Charlie Hebdo, known for its satirical covers lampooning political and religious leaders, lost many of its top editorial staff when Islamist militants broke into an editorial meeting on Jan. 7, 2015, and opened fire.

After that attack, Pope Francis took issue with Charlie Hebdo's anti-religious stance.

"You can't provoke, you can't insult the faith of others, you can't make fun of faith," he told reporters during an Asian tour. The Vatican later issued a statement that said the pope's comments were not intended as a justification for the attacks.

An editorial released before publication of Wednesday's special edition said the magazine would continue despite religious extremists who wanted to muzzle it.

"They won't be the ones to see Charlie die - Charlie will see them kick the bucket," it said.

RELATED: See photos from the anniversary of the Charlie Hebdo attacks

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Vatican newspaper denounces 'woeful' Charlie Hebdo cover
A man removes the covering on a plaque earlier unveiled by French President Francois Hollande outside satirical newspaper Charlie Hebdo former office, Tuesday, Jan. 5, 2016 in Paris. Hollande is honoring 17 victims killed in Islamic extremist attacks on satirical newspaper Charlie Hebdo, a kosher market and police a year ago this week, unveiling plaques around Paris marking violence that ushered in a tumultuous year. The plaque was hastily covered up after authorities discovered a spelling error in the name of slain cartoonist Georges Wolinski, the black covering was later removed, and a new plaque is being prepared after the embarrassing incident. (AP Photo/Christophe Ena)
A plaque unveiled by President Francois Hollande pays tribute to the victims of last year's January attacks outside the kosher supermarket, Tuesday, Jan. 5 2016 in Paris. Hollande has honored 17 victims killed in Islamic extremist attacks on satirical newspaper Charlie Hebdo, a kosher market and police a year ago this week, unveiling plaques around Paris marking violence that ushered in a tumultuous year. Plaque reads: In memory of te Jan.9 , 2015 antisemitic attack in the kosher superlmarket. Names. They died victims of terrorism. (AP Photo/Christophe Ena)
A man enters the kosher supermarket as flowers laid by French President Francois Hollande are seen outside, in Paris, Tuesday, Jan. 5 2016. Hollande has honored 17 victims killed in Islamic extremist attacks on satirical newspaper Charlie Hebdo, a kosher market and police a year ago this week, unveiling plaques around Paris marking violence that ushered in a tumultuous year.(AP Photo/Christophe Ena)
People stand next to spray painted on the sidewalk reading: "Je suis Ahmed," or "I am Ahmed," in the red, white and blue of the French flag near a plaque commemorating late police officer Ahmed Merabet in Paris, Tuesday Jan. 5, 2016. Hollande is honoring 17 victims killed in Islamic extremist attacks on satirical newspaper Charlie Hebdo, a kosher market and police a year ago this week, unveiling plaques around Paris marking violence that ushered in a tumultuous year. Police officer Merabet was killed as he tried to chase down the fleeing gunmen. (AP Photo/Christophe Ena)
People watch and take photos of a spray painted portrait of late police officer Ahmed Merabet and reading "Je suis Ahmed," or "I am Ahmed," in Paris, Tuesday Jan. 5, 2016. Hollande is honoring 17 victims killed in Islamic extremist attacks on satirical newspaper Charlie Hebdo, a kosher market and police a year ago this week, unveiling plaques around Paris marking violence that ushered in a tumultuous year. Police officer Merabet was killed as he tried to chase down the fleeing gunmen. Police officer Merabet was killed as he tried to chase down the fleeing gunmen. (AP Photo/Christophe Ena)
A plaque honoring policeman Ahmed Merabet is pictured in Paris, Tuesday Jan. 5, 2016. French President Francois Hollande is honoring 17 victims killed in Islamic extremist attacks on satirical newspaper Charlie Hebdo, a kosher market and police a year ago this week, unveiling plaques around Paris marking violence that ushered in a tumultuous year. Plaque reads: In the memory of police officer Ahmed Merabet, killed on Jan.7 2015, victim of terrorism and killed in service. (AP Photo/Christophe Ena)
Policemen walk past spray painted on the sidewalk reading: "Je suis Ahmed," or "I am Ahmed," in the red, white and blue of the French flag near a plaque commemorating late police officer Ahmed Merabet in Paris, Tuesday Jan. 5, 2016. Hollande is honoring 17 victims killed in Islamic extremist attacks on satirical newspaper Charlie Hebdo, a kosher market and police a year ago this week, unveiling plaques around Paris marking violence that ushered in a tumultuous year. Police officer Merabet was killed as he tried to chase down the fleeing gunmen. (AP Photo/Christophe Ena)
Policemen stand next to spray painted on the sidewalk reading: "Je suis Ahmed," or "I am Ahmed," in the red, white and blue of the French flag near a plaque commemorating late police officer Ahmed Merabet in Paris, Tuesday Jan. 5, 2016. Hollande is honoring 17 victims killed in Islamic extremist attacks on satirical newspaper Charlie Hebdo, a kosher market and police a year ago this week, unveiling plaques around Paris marking violence that ushered in a tumultuous year. Police officer Merabet was killed as he tried to chase down the fleeing gunmen. (AP Photo/Christophe Ena)
A French soldier patrols after French President Francois Hollande attended a ceremony to pay tribute to the victims of last year's January attacks outside the kosher supermarket in Paris, Tuesday, Jan. 5 2016. Hollande has honored 17 victims killed in Islamic extremist attacks on satirical newspaper Charlie Hebdo, a kosher market and police a year ago this week, unveiling plaques around Paris marking violence that ushered in a tumultuous year. (Ian Langsdon, Pool Photo via AP)
French President Francois Hollande kisses late police officer Ahmed Merabet's mother during commemorations in Paris, Tuesday Jan. 5, 2016. Francois Hollande is honoring 17 victims killed in Islamic extremist attacks on satirical newspaper Charlie Hebdo, a kosher market and police a year ago this week, unveiling plaques around Paris marking violence that ushered in a tumultuous year. Hollande paid homage to the police officer killed as he tried to chase down the fleeing gunmen. (Benoit Tessier, Pool Photo via AP)
A painting with the message 'I am Ahmed' is seen in a street on January 5, 2016 after a ceremony to unveil a commemorative plaque at the site where policeman Ahmed Merabet was killed during the last year's January attack in Paris. A total of 17 people were killed in the three days of attacks dubbed 'France's 9/11', marking the start of a string of jihadist strikes in the country that culminated in November's massacre in Paris. / AFP / JOEL SAGET (Photo credit should read JOEL SAGET/AFP/Getty Images)
The mother of Ahmed Merabet (L), the policeman who was killed during the last year's January attack, leaves on January 5, 2016 in Paris after a ceremony to unveil a commemorative plaque at the site where her son was shot. A total of 17 people were killed in the three days of attacks dubbed 'France's 9/11', marking the start of a string of jihadist strikes in the country that culminated in November's massacre in Paris. / AFP / POOL / BENOIT TESSIER (Photo credit should read BENOIT TESSIER/AFP/Getty Images)
A picture taken on January 5, 2016 in Paris shows an art piece made of a painting by French cartoonist Philippe Honore (known as Honore) and mosaic picturing French cartoonist Charb on of the the victims killed in the attack of the satirical newspaper Charlie Hebdo in January 7, 2015. A total of 17 people were killed in the three days of attacks dubbed 'France's 9/11', marking the start of a string of jihadist strikes in the country that culminated in November's massacre in Paris. / AFP / JOEL SAGET / RESTRICTED TO EDITORIAL USE - MANDATORY MENTION OF THE ARTIST UPON PUBLICATION - TO ILLUSTRATE THE EVENT AS SPECIFIED IN THE CAPTION (Photo credit should read JOEL SAGET/AFP/Getty Images)
A picture taken on January 5, 2016 in Paris shows an art piece made of a painting by French cartoonist Philippe Honore (known as Honore) and mosaic picturing French cartoonist Honore on of the the victims killed in the attack of the satirical newspaper Charlie Hebdo in January 7, 2015. A total of 17 people were killed in the three days of attacks dubbed 'France's 9/11', marking the start of a string of jihadist strikes in the country that culminated in November's massacre in Paris. / AFP / JOEL SAGET / RESTRICTED TO EDITORIAL USE - MANDATORY MENTION OF THE ARTIST UPON PUBLICATION - TO ILLUSTRATE THE EVENT AS SPECIFIED IN THE CAPTION (Photo credit should read JOEL SAGET/AFP/Getty Images)
A picture taken on January 5, 2016 in Paris shows an art piece made of a painting by French cartoonist Philippe Honore (known as Honore) and mosaic picturing French cartoonist Tignous on of the the victims killed in the attack of the satirical newspaper Charlie Hebdo in January 7, 2015. A total of 17 people were killed in the three days of attacks dubbed 'France's 9/11', marking the start of a string of jihadist strikes in the country that culminated in November's massacre in Paris. / AFP / JOEL SAGET / RESTRICTED TO EDITORIAL USE - MANDATORY MENTION OF THE ARTIST UPON PUBLICATION - TO ILLUSTRATE THE EVENT AS SPECIFIED IN THE CAPTION (Photo credit should read JOEL SAGET/AFP/Getty Images)
A picture taken on January 5, 2016 on Paris shows an art piece made of a painting by French cartoonist Philippe Honore (known as Honore) and mosaic picturing French cartoonist Cabu on of the the victims killed on the attack of the satirical newspaper Charlie Hebdo on January 7, 2015. A total of 17 people were killed in the three days of attacks dubbed 'France's 9/11', marking the start of a string of jihadist strikes in the country that culminated in November's massacre in Paris. / AFP / JOEL SAGET / RESTRICTED TO EDITORIAL USE - MANDATORY MENTION OF THE ARTIST UPON PUBLICATION - TO ILLUSTRATE THE EVENT AS SPECIFIED IN THE CAPTION (Photo credit should read JOEL SAGET/AFP/Getty Images)
A picture taken on January 5, 2016 in Paris shows an art piece made of a painting by French cartoonist Philippe Honore (known as Honore) and mosaic picturing French cartoonist Wolinski on of the the victims killed in the attack of the satirical newspaper Charlie Hebdo in January 7, 2015. A total of 17 people were killed in the three days of attacks dubbed 'France's 9/11', marking the start of a string of jihadist strikes in the country that culminated in November's massacre in Paris. / AFP / JOEL SAGET / RESTRICTED TO EDITORIAL USE - MANDATORY MENTION OF THE ARTIST UPON PUBLICATION - TO ILLUSTRATE THE EVENT AS SPECIFIED IN THE CAPTION (Photo credit should read JOEL SAGET/AFP/Getty Images)
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