Twin study provides new insight into the genetic risk of cancer

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Twin Study Provides New Insight Into the Genetic Risk of Cancer


A monumental study on cancer rates in twins was released this week, with the research spanning over 60 years. And it's providing new insight into the genetic risk of cancer.

The study found identical twins were 14 percent more likely to develop cancer if their twin was diagnosed with cancer. And same-sex fraternal twins were 5 percent more likely to develop cancer if their twin had cancer, compared to the general population.

SEE ALSO: Heavy sugar consumption increases risk of breast, lung cancer

The study was published in The Journal of the American Medical Association and looked at thousands of twins in Nordic countries between 1943 and 2010.

One researcher told LiveScience the results are more broadly significant because genetics could account for 30 to 60 percent of the variability in cancers like breast cancer, uterine cancer, prostate cancer and testicular cancer.

RELATED: Click through to see commons foods suspected of causing cancer:

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Common foods suspected of causing cancer
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Twin study provides new insight into the genetic risk of cancer

Microwave popcorn

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Soda

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Non-organic fruit

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Processed meats

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Alcohol

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Farmed salmon

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Refined sugars

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Canned tomatoes 

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Potato chips

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Hydrogenated oils

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Artificial sweeteners

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Foods that are highly salted, pickled, or smoked

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Red meat

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Highly processed white flours

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"Diet" or "Low Fat" anything

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Genetically modified organisms (GMO's)

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