1-year-old child dies from apparent heroin overdose

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One-Year-Old Dies of Apparent Heroin Overdose in Utah

PROVO, Utah — Police are investigating the death of 1-year-old girl who died from an apparent heroin overdose.

On Dec. 2, paramedics responded to a 911 call at 509 W. 1800 North in Provo where the child, Penny Cormani was found purple or blue in the lips and not responding.

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The child's mother, Cassandra Leydsman Richards, reported feeding Penny and doing laundry as her daughter played in the front room, according to an unsealed warrant from the Fourth District Court.

Richards put Penny down for a nap around 11 a.m. with a bottle of about 3 oz of vitamin D milk.

According to the warrant, when Richards went to check on Penny at noon, the child was purple or blue in the lips and not responding.

"Cassandra took Penny downstairs and attempted CPR," the warrant states. "Casasandra called 911. Provo paramedics responded and transported Penny to the UVRMC where Penny was later declared deceased."

An autopsy was performed at the medical examiner's office.

"Tests returned from the Autopsy that indicated that Penny had a lethal amount of Heroin and that Codeine was also present," the warrant states.

The day before Penny's death, David and Sina Belgard, allowed Richards and Penny's father, Casey Cormani, to stay in their Provo home.

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After Penny's death, the Belagards consented to a search of their home.

According to the warrant, authorities found numerous items of drug paraphernalia including burnt foil with residue and straws with burnt ends and residue.

"Burnt foil with residue and burnt straws were found inside of the room that Cassandra and Casey stayed in both on the ground and among Cassandra's personal belongings," the warrant states.

Burnt straws were also found in the living area downstairs on the carpet and on the coffee table.

According to the warrant, David Belgard told authorities he had seen Richards and Cormani using the straws to inhale their prescriptions.

"Cassandra and Casey both deny any illicit drug use and state that they consume their medications orally as prescribed," the warrant states. "Both Casey and Cassandra reported that the paraphernalia belonged to either David or Sina."

A criminal history check showed David Belgard has been arrested and/or convicted on charges including driving under the influence, possession of drug paraphernalia, possession of heroin, amphetamine and marijuana, false information to police and resisting arrest.

No one has been arrested in connection with Penny's death at this time.

Related: Take a closer look at the heroin problem in Gloucester, Massachusetts:

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Heroin addict amnesty in Gloucester, Mass.
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1-year-old child dies from apparent heroin overdose
In this July 10, 2015, photo, a woman speaks to The Associated Press inside the police station in Gloucester, Mass. The woman voluntarily came to the police for help kicking her heroin addiction. Gloucester is taking a novel approach to the war on drugs, making the police station a first stop for addicts on the road to recovery. Addicts can turn in their drugs to police, no questions asked, and officers, volunteers and trained clinicians help connect them with detox and treatment services. (AP Photo/Elise Amendola)
In this Sept. 18, 2015, photo, Kylee Moriarty, left, and her mother, Jackie Law, sit together outside the halfway house in Boston where Moriarty resided. This was their first meeting in person in more than a year. Moriarty is among more than 200 addicts taking advantage of a unique program offered by police in Gloucester, in which heroin addicts are fast-tracked into treatment rather than arrested. (AP Photo/Philip Marcelo)
FILE - In this July 10, 2015 file photo, volunteer Ruth Cote, facing, hugs Kylee Moriarty, who had voluntarily come to the police for help kicking her heroin addiction, inside the police station in Gloucester, Mass. Gloucester Police said nearly 40 departments in nine states have launched initiatives similar to their ANGEL program, which helps connect addicts to treatment if they come to the police station and commit to getting clean. Addicts can even turn in their drugs and drug-using paraphernalia unquestioned. (AP Photo/Elise Amendola, File)
FILE - In this Sept. 18, 2015, file photo, Kylee Moriarty, left, and her mother Jackie Law sit together outside a halfway house in Boston where Moriarty resided. Moriarty is among several hundred addicts taking advantage of a unique program offered by police in Gloucester, in which heroin addicts are fast-tracked into treatment rather than arrested. She resolved to kick her heroin addiction in July. After some initial progress, Kylee relapsed and landed in the hospital. She missed Thanksgiving and Christmas as she goes through her second attempt at treatment. (AP Photo/Philip Marcelo, File)
In this July 10, 2015, photo, a woman speaks to The Associated Press inside the police station in Gloucester, Mass. The woman voluntarily came to the police for help kicking her heroin addiction. Gloucester is taking a novel approach to the war on drugs, making the police station a first stop for addicts on the road to recovery. Addicts can turn in their drugs to police, no questions asked, and officers, volunteers and trained clinicians help connect them with detox and treatment services. (AP Photo/Elise Amendola)
In this July 10, 2015, photo, a woman walks from the police station in Gloucester, Mass., for her ride to an area detox facility. The woman voluntarily came to the police for help kicking her heroin addiction. Gloucester is taking a novel approach to the war on drugs, making the police station a first stop for addicts on the road to recovery. Addicts can turn in their drugs to police, no questions asked, and officers, volunteers and trained clinicians help connect them with detox and treatment services. (AP Photo/Elise Amendola)
In this July 10, 2015, photo, Gloucester Police Chief Leonard Campanello speaks to The Associated Press in Gloucester, Mass. Gloucester is taking a novel approach to the war on drugs, making the police station a first stop for addicts on the road to recovery. Addicts can turn in their drugs to police, no questions asked, and officers, volunteers and trained clinicians help connect them with detox and treatment services. (AP Photo/Elise Amendola)
In this July 10, 2015, photo, a woman squeezes her coffee stirrer as she speaks to The Associated Press in Gloucester, Mass. The woman voluntarily came to the police for help kicking her heroin addiction. Gloucester is taking a novel approach to the war on drugs, making the police station a first stop for addicts on the road to recovery. Addicts can turn in their drugs to police, no questions asked, and officers, volunteers and trained clinicians help connect them with detox and treatment services. (AP Photo/Elise Amendola)
Police Chief Leonard Campanello confers with Joan Whitney, director of the Healthy Gloucester Collaborative, at his office in Gloucester, Mass., Monday, June 1, 2015. Gloucester Police are launching a new program this week, promising heroin addicts they won't be arrested if they bring their drugs to the police station. Chief Campanello says instead, addicts will be given help. (AP Photo/Elise Amendola)
Police Chief Leonard Campanello poses at his office in Gloucester, Mass., Monday, June 1, 2015. Gloucester Police are launching a new program this week, promising heroin addicts they won't be arrested if they bring their drugs to the police station. Chief Campanello says instead, addicts will be given help. (AP Photo/Elise Amendola)
GLOUCESTER, MA - SEPTEMBER 3: Marty Ginivan, an 'angel' volunteering with the police department in Gloucester, Mass., helps move drug addicts into recovery as part of its Angel Program. The program gives addicts the chance to turn in all the drugs they have on themselves in exchange for amnesty for any crimes as long as they agree to go into treatment. Ginivan is photographed Thursday, September 3, 2015, at the Gloucester Police Department. (Photo by Gabe Souza/Portland Press Herald via Getty Images)
GLOUCESTER, MASS - AUGUST 31 - Gloucester Massachusetts on August 31, 2015. A man walks on Main Street and Hancock street downtown. The Gloucester police force has been running an experiment that appears unprecedented anywhere in America. Its architect is a former undercover drug cop Chief Leonard Campanello. Any opiate addict who wanted to get clean would be invited to show up at headquarters. The Gloucester PD would work the phones to get them into treatment - 'not in hours or days, but on the spot.' A volunteer 'angel' would offer them companionship. Even if they brought drugs with them, they would not be charged. Carlos Osorio/Toronto Star (Carlos Osorio/Toronto Star via Getty Images)
GLOUCESTER, MASS - AUGUST 31 - The Western Harbor in Gloucester Massachusetts served as a backdrop for a candle light vigil for people who had died of an overdose on August 31, 2015. The bags had messages written on them from friends and family members. They were held down with sand and a single glow stick was dropped inside. The rally was held on National Overdose Awareness Day. The Gloucester police force has been running an experiment that appears unprecedented anywhere in America. Its architect is a former undercover drug cop Chief Leonard Campanello. Any opiate addict who wanted to get clean would be invited to show up at headquarters. The Gloucester PD would work the phones to get them into treatment - 'not in hours or days, but on the spot.' A volunteer 'angel' would offer them companionship. Even if they brought drugs with them, they would not be charged. Carlos Osorio/Toronto Star (Carlos Osorio/Toronto Star via Getty Images)
GLOUCESTER, MASS - AUGUST 31 -Collette D'Amico is hugged by Maureen Cavanagh before the start of the vigil in Gloucester Massachusetts. Collette's son Derek died of an overdose. He was 23. The vigil was for people who had died of an overdose. The bags had messages written on them from friends and family members. They were held down with sand and a single glow stick was dropped inside. The rally was held on National Overdose Awareness Day. The Gloucester police force has been running an experiment that appears unprecedented anywhere in America. Its architect is a former undercover drug cop Chief Leonard Campanello. Any opiate addict who wanted to get clean would be invited to show up at headquarters. The Gloucester PD would work the phones to get them into treatment - 'not in hours or days, but on the spot.' A volunteer 'angel' would offer them companionship. Even if they brought drugs with them, they would not be charged. Carlos Osorio/Toronto Star (Carlos Osorio/Toronto Star via Getty Images)
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